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Courier reviews the top news stories of 2016 - Ceres Courier

Monday, January 23, 2017

Neel Park just west of Sam Vaughn Elementary School; and encouragement of a "Friends of Ceres Parks" program to help financially support Ceres' parks.On Jan. 7 Ceres got a new city clerk in Diane Nayares-Perez who replaced Lori Frontella who was an interim city clerk. Cindy Heidorn, the last permanent city clerk, served for 12 years until she retired in 2015.A special Ceres Police Department ceremony held Jan. 21 to formally see the promotion of Patrick Crane as lieutenant from sergeant, Greg Yotsuya and Travis Hudson as sergeants and the swearing-in of new officers Miguel Villalobos, Kevin Sakasegawa and Charles Hernandez.Richard McKay, a longtime Ceres resident, retired Sheriff's captain and community servant for over 50 years was honored with the 2015 Citizen of the Year Lifetime Achievement Award at the Jan. 29 Community Service Awards & Installation Dinner. Lonny Davis, owner of Davis Guest Home, active member of the Rotary Club of Ceres and humanitarian through Hope Haven West, was selected to receive the Distinguished Service Award. Lisa Mantarro Moore was named the "Volunteer of the Year." Exit Realty Consultants was named "Business of the Year." Sole Save Shoe Repair was bestowed with the "Downtown Business of the Year" award. Michael Thompson was selected as the "Young Citizen of the Year." The "Service Club of the Year" award went to the Center for Human Services/Ceres Partnership. Superior Fruit Ranch was given the Legacy Award which honors individuals and/or businesses that have contributed through service, support or volunteer efforts, to the Ceres community for more than 40 years. The banquet also saw the installation of new Chamber directors Narinder Bahia, Becki Barton-Nicholes, Geri Lewis, Lea Ann Hoogestraat, Juan Romo, David Gonzales and Benjamin Sivils and treasurer John "J.C." Curtis. The Board of Directors has voted to re-elect Renee Ledbetter as president and Helen Condit as vice president, each to another two-year term.FebruaryOn Feb. 2 seven children ranging in age from 2 to 9 were removed from deplorable living conditions in the 1900 block of Darrah Street that included cockroaches, animal feces, and human filth, while three adults were arrested and booked into the County Jail. The discovery was made when police responded to a 10:02 p.m. call about a man and woman arguing in the street. Upon the officers' arrival, they The children were released to Child Protective Services.MarchTwo young girls, aged 18 months and six years, were removed from their parents in the 2600 blo...

The Cardinal Trying to Save Chicago - The Atlantic

Monday, November 21, 2016

He bears none of the traits of a stereotypical political operator, and yet he has maneuvered quickly to build alliances within his new city: Cook County’s sheriff, Tom Dart, and board president, Toni Preckwinkle, both told me they have a tighter relationship with Cupich than they ever did with the previous cardinal, Francis George, who served Chicago for 17 years. “It’s just a closer personal relationship,” Emanuel said.While George was born in Chicago, Cupich grew up in Omaha, one of nine children in a family of Croatian descent. (That’s the explanation for his “funny name,” as a bishop’s housekeeper once called it—the pronunciation is SOUP-itch.) He attended seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he proved himself “smart” and “a little obnoxious about Nebraska football,” according to his long-time friend John Carr, a former policy adviser to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, or USCCB. After completing graduate studies and serving in a number of parishes and universities, Cupich took his first major post as the bishop of Rapid City, South Dakota, in 1998.It was during this time that he began building his reputation as a Church fixer. In 2002, the American church was just beginning to deal with the fall-out of the clergy sex-abuse scandal uncovered that year by The Boston Globe. Burke, then a justice on the Illinois Appellate Court, was part of the USCCB’s initial working group on the matter, and that’s where she first met Cupich. “We had a very difficult time with the bishops and cardinals, trying to get them to cooperate with our investigation process,” Burke said. Cupich “was a shining light in all of this, because he actually spent a lot of time talking to us and helping us with the whole investigation.”As Cupich’s career unfolded, he frequently worked on difficult administrative issues in the dioceses where he was assigned: When he arrived in Spokane in 2010, for example, he initiated a lawsuit against the firm that had led the diocese through bankruptcy proceedings several years earlier, alleging that it could have saved millions of dollars. But the challenges in Chicago dwarf the issues Cupich encountered in places like Spokane: During the fiscal year before he arrived, Chicago’s archdiocese ran an operating deficit of more than $123 million, meaning it didn’t bring in enough cash to pay for roughly 11 percent of its expenses that year.One of the first things Cupich did when he got to the city was have dinner with Burke, his o...

Virginian-Pilot editorial: For Suffolk, Johnson, Ward, Milteer and Fawcett - Virginian-Pilot

Monday, October 31, 2016

Johnson has led Suffolk since 2006, including during the restive period that led to a mass ouster of City Council incumbents in 2014. Last year, a new city manager took charge at City Hall.In the two years since that last municipal election, Suffolk’s leadership has settled into a relatively genial stalemate.The election is unlikely to change that.Johnson faces Kerry Holmes, a downtown resident who has also run for City Council (2014) and state Senate (2013). Holmes, who emphasizes smarter growth in a city that has needed that for years, would be a capable public servant if he can find the right role. In this case, his reach may exceed his grasp.The same can be said for Holland’s Brian Bass, who is running on a platform focused on the schools.Neither man, despite passion and intelligence, makes a convincing case for Johnson’s ouster, especially given her growth in the job.Ben Fitzgerald has run an on-again, off-again, perhaps on-again campaign in the Nansemond Borough. Despite incumbent Lue Ward’s meager accomplishments in office, Fitzgerald simply can’t make the case to replace the small-newspaper publisher. That situation points quite specifically to the need for better choices in the city’s rapidly growing northern end.Something entirely different is happening among those campaigning to supplant incumbent Curtis Milteer as the representative from the Whaleyville Borough.Milteer’s time on City Council stretches back to 1980, six years after the city itself was founded. His re-election would make him one of the longest-serving municipal officials in Virginia history.He’s running against three compelling candidates, including James Faulk, chairman of the city’s Economic Development Authority; Vanessa Harris, 61, a funeral home and music production company owner and middle school teacher...

Arts|Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor Dies at 79; Celebrated Gullah Food and Culture - New York Times

Monday, September 26, 2016

Vertamae Smart was born on April 4, 1937, in Fairfax, S.C. Her only sibling, a twin brother, died in infancy. When she was around 10, she moved with her parents to Philadelphia.In her new city, she was ridiculed for the low-country way she spoke, her height (six feet) and her family’s dinner-table choices. She soon realized that “Americans eat cornflakes, Campbell’s soup, mashed potatoes,” Ms. Smart-Grosvenor recalled in an oral history interview for Tulane University in 1992. “We ate rice.”Growing up, she read about and became fascinated by the Beat Generation’s bohemian lives and Josephine Baker’s success in Paris. At 19, inspired and encouraged, Ms. Smart moved to Paris, having saved enough money from her job as a department store shipping clerk to sail there alone.She found her tribe at a modest Left Bank residence nicknamed the Beat Hotel: a group of expatriate writers and artists, including Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. One of them, the New York-born sculptor Robert Grosvenor, became her husband.In a 1986 radio commentary, Ms. Smart-Grosvenor remembered her arrival. “As I walked down the Boulevard Saint-Germain, I thought, ‘I can’t paint, I can’t write, and I can’t sing and dance like La Baker, but something great and wonderful is gonna happen to me.’ The myth of Europe made me believe in the possibilities.”Jessica B. Harris, author of “High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey From Africa to America,” has an explanation for the young Ms. Smart’s success. “Vertamae was a connector,” Ms. Harris said in an interview on Monday. “She made a way out of no way. She created this extraordinary legacy out of whole cloth — with probably not a lot of help.”In a 1981 interview with The New York Times, Ms. Smart-Grosvenor recounted another Parisian experience, her exhausting but ultimately successful search in 1959 for the ingredients for a proper down-home New Year’s meal: black-eyed peas (essential for good luck), yams, ham hocks and something similar to collard greens. “The cornbread was no problem,” she remembered. “Even the French sold cornmeal.”Returning to the United States, where she lived in New York and Washington, she continued to explore her talents, doing improvisational acting in Tompkins Square Park. And she built a circle of notable acquaintances. Friends recalled arriving at dinner parties and finding the likes of James Baldwin, Maya Angelou, Amiri Baraka and Nikki Giovanni among the guests.According to Ms. Dash, the Grosvenors’ first dinner party after returning to New York was for a young Japanese artist whom Ms. Smart-Grosvenor found “very sweet and shy.” That guest was Yoko Ono, years before she met John Lennon.In addition to appearing frequently on the NPR series “All Things Considered,” Ms. Smart-Grosvenor hosted “Seasonings,” a series of NPR cooking specials, and was briefly the host of “The Americas’ Family Kitchen With Vertamae Grosvenor” on public television in the 1990s.In recent years, she had lived in Palm Key, S.C., a private island just one county away from her birthplace. Her survivors include two daughters, Chandra Weinland Brown, whose father is Oscar Weinland, a sculptor and visual artist, and Kali Grosvenor-Henry; and two grandchildren.In a 1988 interview with The Times, for an article that included her recipe for Frogmore stew (a k a, a low-country shrimp boil), she reiterated her lifelong passion for cooking. “Whatever goes into your mouth,” she observed, “should be something that has been thought about.”Then she offered perhaps the ultimate example of its primacy. “You can’t have a proper funeral without food,” she said. “When someone dies, the food, the spread, ...

Gene Raynor, former city and state elections chief, dies - Baltimore Sun

Monday, September 26, 2016

William Donald Schaefer, but they fought like brothers. They complained about each other all the time."Schaefer had a great deal of respect for his knowledge and acumen," said Mr. Ehrlich. "Gene knew city politics better than anyone I ever met.""Nobody knew the election laws like Gene did," said state Sen. Catherine E. Pugh, the Democratic nominee for mayor. "He was a wonderful guy."Mr. Raynor retired from the state post in 1997.The city's election board named him its chief in early 2006. He returned to his old post and held it for less than a year when he resigned after a partisan squabble following that year's primary election.In that primary, Mr. Schaefer was running for comptroller in what would be his final campaign. Mr. Raynor realized his friend was in trouble. He received early, unofficial counts regarding Mr. Schaefer's performance at three key polling places — Little Italy, Canton and Highlandtown — and called political allies to warn them his old friend's political career had ended.American Joe Miedusiewski, a former Maryland state senator and a Democrat, recalled once asking Mr. Raynor about close elections that resulted in recounts. "He told me, 'Joe, if they don't have it [the votes] they don't get it.'"At the time of his retirement in 2006, The Baltimore Sun said: "Raynor's answering machine at his home in Baltimore's Little Italy neighborhood has long offered a simple greeting: 'Not in. Leave message.' No frills, straight forward, to the point. That's Raynor — Baltimore's elections director and a fixture on the city and state election scene."The story described him as a "short, stocky man whose penchant for casual dress makes him seem more like the head of a bowling league than an elections office.""He was loyal to the people he loved," said former state Sen. John A. Pica Jr., a Democrat. "He had an institutional memory and had great political instincts. I never knew him to pick a loser. He knew people by their ward and precinct."Mr. Raynor had other interests. In the late 1970s he bought the Waterfront Hotel, a bar and restaurant in Fells Point that became a gathering place for his legion of friends. Mr. Raynor often dined there with Mr. Schaefer and the governor's friend, Hilda Mae Snoops.He was also a partner at Dalesio's of Little Italy, but had relinquished his role there in recent years. For a short time he managed The Crease in Towson.At Mr. Raynor's request, funeral services were private.Survivors include a sister, Marie Rodgers, and a niece, Trudine N. Callinan, both of Baltimore.jacques.kelly@baltsun.com...

God and His People - Revelation 21 - Pike County News Watchman

Monday, July 25, 2016

Planet earth and the entire universe will be remade, and the curse of sin will be lifted and sin will be no more.Then the new city called Jerusalem will descend from heaven to earth adorned in beauty. Such beauty John could not describe except to say that it was as beautiful as a bride looks to the groom.Then comes the declaration from the angel … Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God.This is the reality God has been waiting for. Finally, after all the sin and death, God will have for Himself a people, and we will have for ourselves the true God.Jeremiah 32:37–41 (ESV)37 Behold, I will gather them from all the countries to which I drove them in my anger and my wrath and in great indignation. I will bring them back to this place, and I will make them dwell in safety. 38 And they shall be my people, and I will be their God. 39 I will give them one heart and one way, that they may fear me forever, for their own good and the good of their children after them. 40 I will make with them an everlasting covenant, that I will not turn away from doing good to them. And I will put the fear of me in their hearts, that they may not turn from me. 41 I will rejoice in doing them good, and I will plant them in this land in faithfulness, with all my heart and all my soul.Notice with me how in verse 4 God has to use negative language because we have no context to understand heaven at this point apart from things that won’t be there…4 He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”We know these things in this fallen world all too well, don’t we? Never will a tear be shed in the new city. No death because there is no sin. No sickness and pain because there is no decay, because the old order (cursed earth) has died. The last thing to die will be death. Can you imagine a world like that?/p...

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Courier reviews the top news stories of 2016 - Ceres Courier

Monday, January 23, 2017

Neel Park just west of Sam Vaughn Elementary School; and encouragement of a "Friends of Ceres Parks" program to help financially support Ceres' parks.On Jan. 7 Ceres got a new city clerk in Diane Nayares-Perez who replaced Lori Frontella who was an interim city clerk. Cindy Heidorn, the last permanent city clerk, served for 12 years until she retired in 2015.A special Ceres Police Department ceremony held Jan. 21 to formally see the promotion of Patrick Crane as lieutenant from sergeant, Greg Yotsuya and Travis Hudson as sergeants and the swearing-in of new officers Miguel Villalobos, Kevin Sakasegawa and Charles Hernandez.Richard McKay, a longtime Ceres resident, retired Sheriff's captain and community servant for over 50 years was honored with the 2015 Citizen of the Year Lifetime Achievement Award at the Jan. 29 Community Service Awards & Installation Dinner. Lonny Davis, owner of Davis Guest Home, active member of the Rotary Club of Ceres and humanitarian through Hope Haven West, was selected to receive the Distinguished Service Award. Lisa Mantarro Moore was named the "Volunteer of the Year." Exit Realty Consultants was named "Business of the Year." Sole Save Shoe Repair was bestowed with the "Downtown Business of the Year" award. Michael Thompson was selected as the "Young Citizen of the Year." The "Service Club of the Year" award went to the Center for Human Services/Ceres Partnership. Superior Fruit Ranch was given the Legacy Award which honors individuals and/or businesses that have contributed through service, support or volunteer efforts, to the Ceres community for more than 40 years. The banquet also saw the installation of new Chamber directors Narinder Bahia, Becki Barton-Nicholes, Geri Lewis, Lea Ann Hoogestraat, Juan Romo, David Gonzales and Benjamin Sivils and treasurer John "J.C." Curtis. The Board of Directors has voted to re-elect Renee Ledbetter as president and Helen Condit as vice president, each to another two-year term.FebruaryOn Feb. 2 seven children ranging in age from 2 to 9 were removed from deplorable living conditions in the 1900 block of Darrah Street that included cockroaches, animal feces, and human filth, while three adults were arrested and booked into the County Jail. The discovery was made when police responded to a 10:02 p.m. call about a man and woman arguing in the street. Upon the officers' arrival, they The children were released to Child Protective Services.MarchTwo young girls, aged 18 months and six years, were removed from their parents in the 2600 blo...

The Cardinal Trying to Save Chicago - The Atlantic

Monday, November 21, 2016

He bears none of the traits of a stereotypical political operator, and yet he has maneuvered quickly to build alliances within his new city: Cook County’s sheriff, Tom Dart, and board president, Toni Preckwinkle, both told me they have a tighter relationship with Cupich than they ever did with the previous cardinal, Francis George, who served Chicago for 17 years. “It’s just a closer personal relationship,” Emanuel said.While George was born in Chicago, Cupich grew up in Omaha, one of nine children in a family of Croatian descent. (That’s the explanation for his “funny name,” as a bishop’s housekeeper once called it—the pronunciation is SOUP-itch.) He attended seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he proved himself “smart” and “a little obnoxious about Nebraska football,” according to his long-time friend John Carr, a former policy adviser to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, or USCCB. After completing graduate studies and serving in a number of parishes and universities, Cupich took his first major post as the bishop of Rapid City, South Dakota, in 1998.It was during this time that he began building his reputation as a Church fixer. In 2002, the American church was just beginning to deal with the fall-out of the clergy sex-abuse scandal uncovered that year by The Boston Globe. Burke, then a justice on the Illinois Appellate Court, was part of the USCCB’s initial working group on the matter, and that’s where she first met Cupich. “We had a very difficult time with the bishops and cardinals, trying to get them to cooperate with our investigation process,” Burke said. Cupich “was a shining light in all of this, because he actually spent a lot of time talking to us and helping us with the whole investigation.”As Cupich’s career unfolded, he frequently worked on difficult administrative issues in the dioceses where he was assigned: When he arrived in Spokane in 2010, for example, he initiated a lawsuit against the firm that had led the diocese through bankruptcy proceedings several years earlier, alleging that it could have saved millions of dollars. But the challenges in Chicago dwarf the issues Cupich encountered in places like Spokane: During the fiscal year before he arrived, Chicago’s archdiocese ran an operating deficit of more than $123 million, meaning it didn’t bring in enough cash to pay for roughly 11 percent of its expenses that year.One of the first things Cupich did when he got to the city was have dinner with Burke, his o...

Virginian-Pilot editorial: For Suffolk, Johnson, Ward, Milteer and Fawcett - Virginian-Pilot

Monday, October 31, 2016

Johnson has led Suffolk since 2006, including during the restive period that led to a mass ouster of City Council incumbents in 2014. Last year, a new city manager took charge at City Hall.In the two years since that last municipal election, Suffolk’s leadership has settled into a relatively genial stalemate.The election is unlikely to change that.Johnson faces Kerry Holmes, a downtown resident who has also run for City Council (2014) and state Senate (2013). Holmes, who emphasizes smarter growth in a city that has needed that for years, would be a capable public servant if he can find the right role. In this case, his reach may exceed his grasp.The same can be said for Holland’s Brian Bass, who is running on a platform focused on the schools.Neither man, despite passion and intelligence, makes a convincing case for Johnson’s ouster, especially given her growth in the job.Ben Fitzgerald has run an on-again, off-again, perhaps on-again campaign in the Nansemond Borough. Despite incumbent Lue Ward’s meager accomplishments in office, Fitzgerald simply can’t make the case to replace the small-newspaper publisher. That situation points quite specifically to the need for better choices in the city’s rapidly growing northern end.Something entirely different is happening among those campaigning to supplant incumbent Curtis Milteer as the representative from the Whaleyville Borough.Milteer’s time on City Council stretches back to 1980, six years after the city itself was founded. His re-election would make him one of the longest-serving municipal officials in Virginia history.He’s running against three compelling candidates, including James Faulk, chairman of the city’s Economic Development Authority; Vanessa Harris, 61, a funeral home and music production company owner and middle school teacher...

Arts|Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor Dies at 79; Celebrated Gullah Food and Culture - New York Times

Monday, September 26, 2016

Vertamae Smart was born on April 4, 1937, in Fairfax, S.C. Her only sibling, a twin brother, died in infancy. When she was around 10, she moved with her parents to Philadelphia.In her new city, she was ridiculed for the low-country way she spoke, her height (six feet) and her family’s dinner-table choices. She soon realized that “Americans eat cornflakes, Campbell’s soup, mashed potatoes,” Ms. Smart-Grosvenor recalled in an oral history interview for Tulane University in 1992. “We ate rice.”Growing up, she read about and became fascinated by the Beat Generation’s bohemian lives and Josephine Baker’s success in Paris. At 19, inspired and encouraged, Ms. Smart moved to Paris, having saved enough money from her job as a department store shipping clerk to sail there alone.She found her tribe at a modest Left Bank residence nicknamed the Beat Hotel: a group of expatriate writers and artists, including Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. One of them, the New York-born sculptor Robert Grosvenor, became her husband.In a 1986 radio commentary, Ms. Smart-Grosvenor remembered her arrival. “As I walked down the Boulevard Saint-Germain, I thought, ‘I can’t paint, I can’t write, and I can’t sing and dance like La Baker, but something great and wonderful is gonna happen to me.’ The myth of Europe made me believe in the possibilities.”Jessica B. Harris, author of “High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey From Africa to America,” has an explanation for the young Ms. Smart’s success. “Vertamae was a connector,” Ms. Harris said in an interview on Monday. “She made a way out of no way. She created this extraordinary legacy out of whole cloth — with probably not a lot of help.”In a 1981 interview with The New York Times, Ms. Smart-Grosvenor recounted another Parisian experience, her exhausting but ultimately successful search in 1959 for the ingredients for a proper down-home New Year’s meal: black-eyed peas (essential for good luck), yams, ham hocks and something similar to collard greens. “The cornbread was no problem,” she remembered. “Even the French sold cornmeal.”Returning to the United States, where she lived in New York and Washington, she continued to explore her talents, doing improvisational acting in Tompkins Square Park. And she built a circle of notable acquaintances. Friends recalled arriving at dinner parties and finding the likes of James Baldwin, Maya Angelou, Amiri Baraka and Nikki Giovanni among the guests.According to Ms. Dash, the Grosvenors’ first dinner party after returning to New York was for a young Japanese artist whom Ms. Smart-Grosvenor found “very sweet and shy.” That guest was Yoko Ono, years before she met John Lennon.In addition to appearing frequently on the NPR series “All Things Considered,” Ms. Smart-Grosvenor hosted “Seasonings,” a series of NPR cooking specials, and was briefly the host of “The Americas’ Family Kitchen With Vertamae Grosvenor” on public television in the 1990s.In recent years, she had lived in Palm Key, S.C., a private island just one county away from her birthplace. Her survivors include two daughters, Chandra Weinland Brown, whose father is Oscar Weinland, a sculptor and visual artist, and Kali Grosvenor-Henry; and two grandchildren.In a 1988 interview with The Times, for an article that included her recipe for Frogmore stew (a k a, a low-country shrimp boil), she reiterated her lifelong passion for cooking. “Whatever goes into your mouth,” she observed, “should be something that has been thought about.”Then she offered perhaps the ultimate example of its primacy. “You can’t have a proper funeral without food,” she said. “When someone dies, the food, the spread, ...

Gene Raynor, former city and state elections chief, dies - Baltimore Sun

Monday, September 26, 2016

William Donald Schaefer, but they fought like brothers. They complained about each other all the time."Schaefer had a great deal of respect for his knowledge and acumen," said Mr. Ehrlich. "Gene knew city politics better than anyone I ever met.""Nobody knew the election laws like Gene did," said state Sen. Catherine E. Pugh, the Democratic nominee for mayor. "He was a wonderful guy."Mr. Raynor retired from the state post in 1997.The city's election board named him its chief in early 2006. He returned to his old post and held it for less than a year when he resigned after a partisan squabble following that year's primary election.In that primary, Mr. Schaefer was running for comptroller in what would be his final campaign. Mr. Raynor realized his friend was in trouble. He received early, unofficial counts regarding Mr. Schaefer's performance at three key polling places — Little Italy, Canton and Highlandtown — and called political allies to warn them his old friend's political career had ended.American Joe Miedusiewski, a former Maryland state senator and a Democrat, recalled once asking Mr. Raynor about close elections that resulted in recounts. "He told me, 'Joe, if they don't have it [the votes] they don't get it.'"At the time of his retirement in 2006, The Baltimore Sun said: "Raynor's answering machine at his home in Baltimore's Little Italy neighborhood has long offered a simple greeting: 'Not in. Leave message.' No frills, straight forward, to the point. That's Raynor — Baltimore's elections director and a fixture on the city and state election scene."The story described him as a "short, stocky man whose penchant for casual dress makes him seem more like the head of a bowling league than an elections office.""He was loyal to the people he loved," said former state Sen. John A. Pica Jr., a Democrat. "He had an institutional memory and had great political instincts. I never knew him to pick a loser. He knew people by their ward and precinct."Mr. Raynor had other interests. In the late 1970s he bought the Waterfront Hotel, a bar and restaurant in Fells Point that became a gathering place for his legion of friends. Mr. Raynor often dined there with Mr. Schaefer and the governor's friend, Hilda Mae Snoops.He was also a partner at Dalesio's of Little Italy, but had relinquished his role there in recent years. For a short time he managed The Crease in Towson.At Mr. Raynor's request, funeral services were private.Survivors include a sister, Marie Rodgers, and a niece, Trudine N. Callinan, both of Baltimore.jacques.kelly@baltsun.com...

God and His People - Revelation 21 - Pike County News Watchman

Monday, July 25, 2016

Planet earth and the entire universe will be remade, and the curse of sin will be lifted and sin will be no more.Then the new city called Jerusalem will descend from heaven to earth adorned in beauty. Such beauty John could not describe except to say that it was as beautiful as a bride looks to the groom.Then comes the declaration from the angel … Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God.This is the reality God has been waiting for. Finally, after all the sin and death, God will have for Himself a people, and we will have for ourselves the true God.Jeremiah 32:37–41 (ESV)37 Behold, I will gather them from all the countries to which I drove them in my anger and my wrath and in great indignation. I will bring them back to this place, and I will make them dwell in safety. 38 And they shall be my people, and I will be their God. 39 I will give them one heart and one way, that they may fear me forever, for their own good and the good of their children after them. 40 I will make with them an everlasting covenant, that I will not turn away from doing good to them. And I will put the fear of me in their hearts, that they may not turn from me. 41 I will rejoice in doing them good, and I will plant them in this land in faithfulness, with all my heart and all my soul.Notice with me how in verse 4 God has to use negative language because we have no context to understand heaven at this point apart from things that won’t be there…4 He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”We know these things in this fallen world all too well, don’t we? Never will a tear be shed in the new city. No death because there is no sin. No sickness and pain because there is no decay, because the old order (cursed earth) has died. The last thing to die will be death. Can you imagine a world like that?/p...