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Caledonia Cemetery

6351 Harding Highway East
Caledonia, OH 43314
(419) 845-3923
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Caledonia OH Obituaries and Death Notices

James Clayton Eugene Hovre - La Crosse Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Ettrick; two sons, Timothy (fiancée, Darla Tyznik) Hovre of Marshfield and John Hovre of Ettrick; a son-in-law, Randy (Linda) Holthaus of Bangor; three stepchildren, Kevin and Jason Kittleson both of Caledonia, Minn. and Karmen (Paul) Haugland of Spring Grove, Minn.; nine grandchildren, Megan Hovre, Ross (fiancée, Kayla Leis) Holtaus, Reed Holthaus, Rachel (fiance,`Ryan Allen) Holthaus, Ranae (Tyler) Herman, Jessica (Matt) Hesse, Erik Haugland, Kristin (Shane) O’Brien, Laura Kittleson and John Kittleson; and five great-grandchildren.In addition to his parents and first wife, James was preceded in death by a daughter, Rebecca Holthaus; and a son, James E. Hovre.Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, June 13, in the French Creek Lutheran Church with burial in the church cemetery both in rural Ettrick. Pastor Anna Sorenson will officiate.Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday, June 12, in the French Creek Lutheran Church in rural Ettrick and also one hour prior to the service at the church on Tuesday.The Jack Funeral Home in Blair is assisting the family with arrangements.

AP-USDA-Midwest Regional Eggs - WHIO

Monday, December 05, 2016

Pacific resumed.“From then on it was a bit of everything. Out in the South Pacific I think we hit every island they had: Marianas, Guadalcanal, New Caledonia, and others. I didn’t know there were so many islands out there,” Malan said.America and its allies won World War II. Japan surrendered in August of 1945 and the USS Preble was decommissioned later that year, four years to the day of the Pearl Harbor attack.Malan completed his six years in the Navy and returned home — spending just enough time in his native Illinois to retrieve his seabag before moving to Fairborn. He had a long career with the U.S. Postal Service in Dayton and a 53-year marriage with wife Geneva, who died in 2010 and who he “misses every day.”As Geneva’s health faltered and she had to go to a nursing facility for care prior to her death, Malan moved into an apartment on North Third Street next door to Joslin, 66, who also is a Navy veteran, former machinist mate (serving stateside during the Vietnam era) and a retired Dayton postal worker. The two swapped war stories — including their many years sliding down icy steps and encountering unfriendly dogs and cats while working for the Post Office — over fishing trips, at the shooting range, and while going out to dinner.“He’s not a pretentious type. He’s just a nice, genuine man,” Joslin said of his friend and neighbor. “He lived through a harrowing time. It’s just an honor to be around him.”...

Rangers manager among mourners at funeral of fan killed in bus crash - BT.com

Monday, November 07, 2016

Sanquhar on Thursday where mourners wore Rangers scarves and formed a guard of honour outside the the town's St Bride's Church.Further tributes were paid at the Rangers v Inverness Caledonian Thistle game the following day when a minute's silence was held in his memory and fans displayed a RIP Ryan Baird banner.A total of 37 people, including the driver, were on board the bus when the crash happened at around 1.15pm on October 1 at the Crossroads roundabout near to Bowhouse Prison and 18 people were taken to hospital, three of whom were seriously injured.Following the crash, both Celtic and Rangers issued statements passing on their condolences to Mr Baird's family and senior officials at the Ibrox club later met members of the supporters club and players visited crash victims in hospital.Singer Rod Stewart, a Celtic fan, was among those who donated to a fund set up to help Mr Baird's family, saying: "At sad times like this we are one big football loving family."A Rangers spokesman said on Saturday: "The management and staff have being doing their best to support all of those involved in this accident."It's the least we can do and we are more than happy if it helps in any way at this tragic time."...

The Dresden Press: A controversial relic of Vermont - Barre Montpelier Times Argus

Monday, June 27, 2016

Montpelier to gaze upon this instrument representative of our democracy. In 1922 a special truck was built to transport it to a graphic arts exhibition in Boston. The Caledonian-Record reported that the press was to be accompanied by the director of the exhibition.Through Wells River, the Haverills, Plymouth, Franklin, and on down the line, Concord, Manchester, Nashua, and Lowell, stops will be made to give people an opportunity to view the historic press. The stopover in Manchester has been arranged so that all travelling may be done in daylight and give people a chance to see the oldest press in the country.Perhaps the greatest honor bestowed upon the press came in 1939 when the United States Post Office issued a commemorative stamp in recognition of its tercentennial. It had become one of the most important relics in American history.Not everyone was convinced, however.The historian Samuel Eliot Morison made his doubts known as early as 1935 in his history of The Founding of Harvard College. “It is claimed that an old printing press now in possession of the Vermont Historical Society is the actual one set up by Stephen Day, but the ‘chain of evidence’ has several very weak links. This press is asserted to be the first used in the English colonies. Day’s press must have been too battered by 1700 to be of any use to anyone but a junk dealer.”The Rutland bookseller, Charles Tuttle, rose to its defense in the New England Quarterly (1940). ”John Spargo and Sidney Kimber, without hesitation or apology trace the press from Cambridge to its present home in Montpelier.” Spargo, it should be noted, was president of the Vermont Historical Society from 1927-1939 and Kimber had just published his history of the Stephen Daye press in 1937. Tuttle continued, “Since no one maintains that the press at Montpelier is an anachronous imposter and Uncle Sam has given it – literally, his stamp of approval with a three cent purple issue, the question may be considered settled, with the press properly sanctified as the genuine article.”Twenty years later, Marcus McCorison’s 1959 article in Printing and Graphic Arts officially challenged the prevailing narrative. Studying newspaper accounts from the 19th century, McCorison soon realized that the provenance of the press could only be traced back to 1714. Then he discovered a little known 1792 letter by Isaiah Thomas, the first historian of printing in America. Thomas indicated that the press that had been brought to Vermont and printed the first official state documents was not the legendary Daye press. McCorison concluded his article, “The old press in Montpelier has a fine heritage in any event as the second press in Connecticut and Vermont’s first.”As might be expected, McCorison’s analysis was a great disappointment to many Vermonters who cherished the legacy of the hallowed antique but, as will be demonstrated, the press that has become known as “The Dresden Press” still has a strong claim on Vermont history.McCorison came of age during World War II and, after service in the Navy, attended Ripon College in Wisconsin and later earned two masters degrees, one at UVM and the other in the Library Science program at Columbia. In 1955 he came to Montpelier to become librarian at Kellogg-Hubbard Library and, in a few years time, he was appointed rare books librarian at Dartmouth and eventually librarian of the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts.As his 2013 obituary noted, McCorison’s skills as a noted librarian, bibliographer, and scholar of early American printing were informed by his intense personal interest in American cultural history. Over the course of 32 years at the American Antiquarian Society he served as librarian, director and, finally president. He was named president emeritus of the American Antiquarian Society at his retirement in 1992.While this scholar of printing history consigned the legendary artifact to “second pres...

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James Clayton Eugene Hovre - La Crosse Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Ettrick; two sons, Timothy (fiancée, Darla Tyznik) Hovre of Marshfield and John Hovre of Ettrick; a son-in-law, Randy (Linda) Holthaus of Bangor; three stepchildren, Kevin and Jason Kittleson both of Caledonia, Minn. and Karmen (Paul) Haugland of Spring Grove, Minn.; nine grandchildren, Megan Hovre, Ross (fiancée, Kayla Leis) Holtaus, Reed Holthaus, Rachel (fiance,`Ryan Allen) Holthaus, Ranae (Tyler) Herman, Jessica (Matt) Hesse, Erik Haugland, Kristin (Shane) O’Brien, Laura Kittleson and John Kittleson; and five great-grandchildren.In addition to his parents and first wife, James was preceded in death by a daughter, Rebecca Holthaus; and a son, James E. Hovre.Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, June 13, in the French Creek Lutheran Church with burial in the church cemetery both in rural Ettrick. Pastor Anna Sorenson will officiate.Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday, June 12, in the French Creek Lutheran Church in rural Ettrick and also one hour prior to the service at the church on Tuesday.The Jack Funeral Home in Blair is assisting the family with arrangements.

AP-USDA-Midwest Regional Eggs - WHIO

Monday, December 05, 2016

Pacific resumed.“From then on it was a bit of everything. Out in the South Pacific I think we hit every island they had: Marianas, Guadalcanal, New Caledonia, and others. I didn’t know there were so many islands out there,” Malan said.America and its allies won World War II. Japan surrendered in August of 1945 and the USS Preble was decommissioned later that year, four years to the day of the Pearl Harbor attack.Malan completed his six years in the Navy and returned home — spending just enough time in his native Illinois to retrieve his seabag before moving to Fairborn. He had a long career with the U.S. Postal Service in Dayton and a 53-year marriage with wife Geneva, who died in 2010 and who he “misses every day.”As Geneva’s health faltered and she had to go to a nursing facility for care prior to her death, Malan moved into an apartment on North Third Street next door to Joslin, 66, who also is a Navy veteran, former machinist mate (serving stateside during the Vietnam era) and a retired Dayton postal worker. The two swapped war stories — including their many years sliding down icy steps and encountering unfriendly dogs and cats while working for the Post Office — over fishing trips, at the shooting range, and while going out to dinner.“He’s not a pretentious type. He’s just a nice, genuine man,” Joslin said of his friend and neighbor. “He lived through a harrowing time. It’s just an honor to be around him.”...

Rangers manager among mourners at funeral of fan killed in bus crash - BT.com

Monday, November 07, 2016

Sanquhar on Thursday where mourners wore Rangers scarves and formed a guard of honour outside the the town's St Bride's Church.Further tributes were paid at the Rangers v Inverness Caledonian Thistle game the following day when a minute's silence was held in his memory and fans displayed a RIP Ryan Baird banner.A total of 37 people, including the driver, were on board the bus when the crash happened at around 1.15pm on October 1 at the Crossroads roundabout near to Bowhouse Prison and 18 people were taken to hospital, three of whom were seriously injured.Following the crash, both Celtic and Rangers issued statements passing on their condolences to Mr Baird's family and senior officials at the Ibrox club later met members of the supporters club and players visited crash victims in hospital.Singer Rod Stewart, a Celtic fan, was among those who donated to a fund set up to help Mr Baird's family, saying: "At sad times like this we are one big football loving family."A Rangers spokesman said on Saturday: "The management and staff have being doing their best to support all of those involved in this accident."It's the least we can do and we are more than happy if it helps in any way at this tragic time."...

The Dresden Press: A controversial relic of Vermont - Barre Montpelier Times Argus

Monday, June 27, 2016

Montpelier to gaze upon this instrument representative of our democracy. In 1922 a special truck was built to transport it to a graphic arts exhibition in Boston. The Caledonian-Record reported that the press was to be accompanied by the director of the exhibition.Through Wells River, the Haverills, Plymouth, Franklin, and on down the line, Concord, Manchester, Nashua, and Lowell, stops will be made to give people an opportunity to view the historic press. The stopover in Manchester has been arranged so that all travelling may be done in daylight and give people a chance to see the oldest press in the country.Perhaps the greatest honor bestowed upon the press came in 1939 when the United States Post Office issued a commemorative stamp in recognition of its tercentennial. It had become one of the most important relics in American history.Not everyone was convinced, however.The historian Samuel Eliot Morison made his doubts known as early as 1935 in his history of The Founding of Harvard College. “It is claimed that an old printing press now in possession of the Vermont Historical Society is the actual one set up by Stephen Day, but the ‘chain of evidence’ has several very weak links. This press is asserted to be the first used in the English colonies. Day’s press must have been too battered by 1700 to be of any use to anyone but a junk dealer.”The Rutland bookseller, Charles Tuttle, rose to its defense in the New England Quarterly (1940). ”John Spargo and Sidney Kimber, without hesitation or apology trace the press from Cambridge to its present home in Montpelier.” Spargo, it should be noted, was president of the Vermont Historical Society from 1927-1939 and Kimber had just published his history of the Stephen Daye press in 1937. Tuttle continued, “Since no one maintains that the press at Montpelier is an anachronous imposter and Uncle Sam has given it – literally, his stamp of approval with a three cent purple issue, the question may be considered settled, with the press properly sanctified as the genuine article.”Twenty years later, Marcus McCorison’s 1959 article in Printing and Graphic Arts officially challenged the prevailing narrative. Studying newspaper accounts from the 19th century, McCorison soon realized that the provenance of the press could only be traced back to 1714. Then he discovered a little known 1792 letter by Isaiah Thomas, the first historian of printing in America. Thomas indicated that the press that had been brought to Vermont and printed the first official state documents was not the legendary Daye press. McCorison concluded his article, “The old press in Montpelier has a fine heritage in any event as the second press in Connecticut and Vermont’s first.”As might be expected, McCorison’s analysis was a great disappointment to many Vermonters who cherished the legacy of the hallowed antique but, as will be demonstrated, the press that has become known as “The Dresden Press” still has a strong claim on Vermont history.McCorison came of age during World War II and, after service in the Navy, attended Ripon College in Wisconsin and later earned two masters degrees, one at UVM and the other in the Library Science program at Columbia. In 1955 he came to Montpelier to become librarian at Kellogg-Hubbard Library and, in a few years time, he was appointed rare books librarian at Dartmouth and eventually librarian of the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts.As his 2013 obituary noted, McCorison’s skills as a noted librarian, bibliographer, and scholar of early American printing were informed by his intense personal interest in American cultural history. Over the course of 32 years at the American Antiquarian Society he served as librarian, director and, finally president. He was named president emeritus of the American Antiquarian Society at his retirement in 1992.While this scholar of printing history consigned the legendary artifact to “second pres...