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Gearhart Mack and Jurczyk Funeral Home

655 North Main
Convoy, OH 45832
(419) 749-4338
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Convoy OH Obituaries and Death Notices

James Earl Longley - The Chattanoogan

Monday, March 06, 2017

School in 1942.  He worked briefly for Atlas Power Company before serving two years un the United States Navy during World War II aboard the USS Blair, crossing the Atlantic Ocean 28 times on convoy duty.After his tour of duty in the Navy he worked at McLean Auto Machine Service, Sharp Auto Machine Shop and Tittle Auto Company, all in Chattanooga before opening his own auto repair business, Longley’s Garage in Collegedale in 1955.In 1964 he began driving a school bus for the Hamilton County School System until retiring in 2004.  He enjoyed and never forgot the children who rode with him.Restoring antique Model T and Model A Fords was a hobby that perfectly fit his interest and line of work.  He loved spending time working on old cars and attending car meets with his antique car buddies.  He was a member of the Chickamauga Regional Antique Automobile Club of America for many years resulting in many close and lasting friendships.  He also loved traveling and site-seeing across the country with family and friends.He was preceded in death by his wife, Charlotte Evelyn McGhee Longley, granddaughter, Allison LeAnn DeFriese, sisters, Gladys Dodson, Eva Kirkland, brother, F.G. Longley and sister-in-law, Dorothy McGee.Survivors include his children, Charlotte Alicia (Kenneth) Wilson of Albertville, Al., Stephen Earl Longley of Cleveland, and Candace LeAnn (John) TeHennepe of Chattanooga, three grandchildren, Greg Glover of Jackson, Wy., Amy Perdue of Franklin, Tn., Amanda DeFriese Harwood (James) of Grandview, Tn., four great-grandchildren, Ella and Seth Glover, Paul and Collis Perdue, sisters, Bettye Jean (David) Knisley, Martha Settle, sister-in-law, Dot Longley, and several nieces an...

For Brockton veteran of Iraq, real enemy was addiction, heroin - Enterprise News

Monday, December 05, 2016

The young Hayes reached the rank of sergeant. Hayes was a member of the First Infantry Division, as part of First Platoon, 134 Armor, his friend from the Army said. The group's mission in Iraq was convoy security, Komonchak said.At one point, the young Hayes was able to get a picture of himself and his buddies sitting on a throne in the palace of Al-Faw, which was built to commemorate Iraq's former dictator president Saddam Hussein.Hayes' father said that his son was a top gunner in the tank crew, using a .50 caliber gun."I can’t imagine the damage that can do, and you have to drive up and look at damage you just did," said Tom Hayes, an Air Force veteran, who spoke with his son over the computer during the war. "I know war is hell. ... What has to be done has to be done. But the services to cope afterwards are just as shoddy as Vietnam. ... They spend a lot of money, and there are a lot of good counselors and some bad, but it’s a lot of in-and-out the door."The Brockton father said that returning from war can be a tough adjustment in many respects, including a less structured lifestyle, the difficulty building a career when non-military peers are so far ahead, and the emotional contrast between war-time soldier and civilian life."I think that’s where pills come in, as people try to compensate for that adrenaline rush to make them feel at ease again," Tom Hayes said.Tom Hayes said that his son recently underwent hernia surgery, and was prescribed Percocet afterward. Komonchak, who also used painkillers but was able to stop the habit, said that his former bunkmate was gleeful to receive a large amount of painkilling pills from an Air Force doctor while he was still in the military."So many doctors give them out so liberally," said Hayes' father.Adding to the problem was a traumatic incident when the young Hayes was working as a recruiter at the Army office at the Westgate Mall following his service in Iraq. One day, when Hayes was coming into work, he discovered the body of his boss who committed suicide by shooting himself in the parking lot. The young veteran's response to the tragedy was to self-medicate with opioids, including heroin."He used that to numb the pain," his father said. "The solution to ease the pain and anguish is right down the street down the corner. It’s easier to get heroin than a pack of cigarettes."Despite the tragic end to his life, Tom Hayes said that he's just going to keep thinking about the happy memories and the positive things about his son, who grew up playing Little League baseball and graduated from Oliver Ames High School in Easton before enlisting. In addition to his father, the Iraq War veteran is survived by two younger brothers and a sister."I’m very proud of my son, not only his military service, but for being such a good kid," said Tom Hayes, noting how his son took care of other children in the family. "There’s not a lot of people who could say anything bad about him. ... He was friendly, even when he was sober. He always had a hand out. He was genuinely a good person."...

Update on the latest news, sports, business and entertainment: - Odessa American

Monday, July 25, 2016

Dandach.Dandach's lawyer says his client claimed Islamic State was not a designated terrorist group when he initially planned his trip to Syria to join a charitable aid convoy in 2013.SYRIANEW: US-backed fighters renew offer for IS to leave Syrian townBEIRUT (AP) — U.S.-backed fighters in northern Syria have renewed an offer to Islamic State militants in the besieged northern town of Manbij, saying the extremists can leave it and would not be attacked.The Syria Democratic Forces says the offer is meant to protect civilians in the town.The predominantly Kurdish force has been on the offensive in Manbij, backed by U.S.-led coalition airstrikes.Monday's offer by the SDF-linked Manbij Military Council comes days after the extremists ignored an earlier, 48-hour offer to leave the town just with their "individual weapons."It says that if IS allows all civilians to leave, SDF would in return allow wounded IS militants safe passage to other areas nearby under their control.The council urged IS to send a delegati...

Longtime Pueblo grocer, WWII veteran dies at age 90 - Pueblo Chieftain

Monday, July 04, 2016

Central High School at 17 and then joined the Army to fight in World War II.After time at Fort Logan and at Fort Lewis, Wash., Skufca shipped out and headed overseas in a 38-ship convoy to the Pacific.Skufca, who was featured in The Pueblo Chieftain’s weekly Classic Pueblo series in 2003, started at the landmark store at 920 W. 13th St. in 1946. He became owner in 1960.Recalling his military service, he told The Chieftain: “We were getting ready for the invasion of Ie Shima and having church service on the deck when a Japanese plane came and dropped a bomb on the back of our ship.”He was injured but survived the attack and landed at Ie Shima the next day.Pat Archuleta worked for Skufca for 40 years.“He was a wonderful boss. He taught me a lot. Everybody was very good to him,” Archuleta said Thursday at the store.“He was the friendliest grocer. This was his life. He worked 70 hours a week and sometimes on Sundays. The people in here were more like his family.”Gengenbacher said his generosity showed at the store.“If someone came in and needed something they couldn’t afford, he’d give it to them. He absolutely loved children. They never left without a cookie or some candy,” Gengenbacher.Skufca left the battlefields of World War II with two Bronze Stars and as an honorably discharged, disabled veteran. He returned to Pueblo in 1946.It was then that he came to Star Grocery and Market looking for a job as part of a training program. The owner, a German World War I veteran, hired him on the spot.In 1997, Skufca celebrated 50 years with the market, and said it was not just a milestone for him but for the business, as well.In 2003 he told The C...

Canada evacuating 8000 by air as wildfire rages - The Boston Globe

Monday, June 06, 2016

McMurray, Alberta, Canada. AP  May 06, 2016FORT MCMURRAY, Alberta (AP) — Canadian officials will start moving thousands of people from work camps north of devastated Fort McMurray in a mass highway convoy Friday morning if it is safe from a massive wildfire raging in Alberta.Officials airlifted 8,000 people on Thursday and will continue the airlift Friday, while a mass migration of cars will move south in the morning.The Alberta provincial government, which declared a state of emergency, said more than 1,100 firefighters, 145 helicopters, 138 pieces of heavy equipment and 22 air tankers were fighting the fire, but Chad Morrison, Alberta’s manager of wildfire prevention, said rain is needed.‘‘Let me be clear: air tankers are not going to stop this fire,’’ he said. ‘‘It is going to continue to push through these dry conditions until we actually get some significant rain.’’The fire continued to grow, but it is moving away from Fort McMurray and the rate of its growth has slowed. No rain clouds were expected around Fort McMurray until late Saturday, with 40 percent chance of showers, according to forecasts by Environment Canada.More than 80,000 people have emptied Fort McMurray in the heart of Canada’s oil sands, authorities said.About 25,000 ...

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James Earl Longley - The Chattanoogan

Monday, March 06, 2017

School in 1942.  He worked briefly for Atlas Power Company before serving two years un the United States Navy during World War II aboard the USS Blair, crossing the Atlantic Ocean 28 times on convoy duty.After his tour of duty in the Navy he worked at McLean Auto Machine Service, Sharp Auto Machine Shop and Tittle Auto Company, all in Chattanooga before opening his own auto repair business, Longley’s Garage in Collegedale in 1955.In 1964 he began driving a school bus for the Hamilton County School System until retiring in 2004.  He enjoyed and never forgot the children who rode with him.Restoring antique Model T and Model A Fords was a hobby that perfectly fit his interest and line of work.  He loved spending time working on old cars and attending car meets with his antique car buddies.  He was a member of the Chickamauga Regional Antique Automobile Club of America for many years resulting in many close and lasting friendships.  He also loved traveling and site-seeing across the country with family and friends.He was preceded in death by his wife, Charlotte Evelyn McGhee Longley, granddaughter, Allison LeAnn DeFriese, sisters, Gladys Dodson, Eva Kirkland, brother, F.G. Longley and sister-in-law, Dorothy McGee.Survivors include his children, Charlotte Alicia (Kenneth) Wilson of Albertville, Al., Stephen Earl Longley of Cleveland, and Candace LeAnn (John) TeHennepe of Chattanooga, three grandchildren, Greg Glover of Jackson, Wy., Amy Perdue of Franklin, Tn., Amanda DeFriese Harwood (James) of Grandview, Tn., four great-grandchildren, Ella and Seth Glover, Paul and Collis Perdue, sisters, Bettye Jean (David) Knisley, Martha Settle, sister-in-law, Dot Longley, and several nieces an...

For Brockton veteran of Iraq, real enemy was addiction, heroin - Enterprise News

Monday, December 05, 2016

The young Hayes reached the rank of sergeant. Hayes was a member of the First Infantry Division, as part of First Platoon, 134 Armor, his friend from the Army said. The group's mission in Iraq was convoy security, Komonchak said.At one point, the young Hayes was able to get a picture of himself and his buddies sitting on a throne in the palace of Al-Faw, which was built to commemorate Iraq's former dictator president Saddam Hussein.Hayes' father said that his son was a top gunner in the tank crew, using a .50 caliber gun."I can’t imagine the damage that can do, and you have to drive up and look at damage you just did," said Tom Hayes, an Air Force veteran, who spoke with his son over the computer during the war. "I know war is hell. ... What has to be done has to be done. But the services to cope afterwards are just as shoddy as Vietnam. ... They spend a lot of money, and there are a lot of good counselors and some bad, but it’s a lot of in-and-out the door."The Brockton father said that returning from war can be a tough adjustment in many respects, including a less structured lifestyle, the difficulty building a career when non-military peers are so far ahead, and the emotional contrast between war-time soldier and civilian life."I think that’s where pills come in, as people try to compensate for that adrenaline rush to make them feel at ease again," Tom Hayes said.Tom Hayes said that his son recently underwent hernia surgery, and was prescribed Percocet afterward. Komonchak, who also used painkillers but was able to stop the habit, said that his former bunkmate was gleeful to receive a large amount of painkilling pills from an Air Force doctor while he was still in the military."So many doctors give them out so liberally," said Hayes' father.Adding to the problem was a traumatic incident when the young Hayes was working as a recruiter at the Army office at the Westgate Mall following his service in Iraq. One day, when Hayes was coming into work, he discovered the body of his boss who committed suicide by shooting himself in the parking lot. The young veteran's response to the tragedy was to self-medicate with opioids, including heroin."He used that to numb the pain," his father said. "The solution to ease the pain and anguish is right down the street down the corner. It’s easier to get heroin than a pack of cigarettes."Despite the tragic end to his life, Tom Hayes said that he's just going to keep thinking about the happy memories and the positive things about his son, who grew up playing Little League baseball and graduated from Oliver Ames High School in Easton before enlisting. In addition to his father, the Iraq War veteran is survived by two younger brothers and a sister."I’m very proud of my son, not only his military service, but for being such a good kid," said Tom Hayes, noting how his son took care of other children in the family. "There’s not a lot of people who could say anything bad about him. ... He was friendly, even when he was sober. He always had a hand out. He was genuinely a good person."...

Update on the latest news, sports, business and entertainment: - Odessa American

Monday, July 25, 2016

Dandach.Dandach's lawyer says his client claimed Islamic State was not a designated terrorist group when he initially planned his trip to Syria to join a charitable aid convoy in 2013.SYRIANEW: US-backed fighters renew offer for IS to leave Syrian townBEIRUT (AP) — U.S.-backed fighters in northern Syria have renewed an offer to Islamic State militants in the besieged northern town of Manbij, saying the extremists can leave it and would not be attacked.The Syria Democratic Forces says the offer is meant to protect civilians in the town.The predominantly Kurdish force has been on the offensive in Manbij, backed by U.S.-led coalition airstrikes.Monday's offer by the SDF-linked Manbij Military Council comes days after the extremists ignored an earlier, 48-hour offer to leave the town just with their "individual weapons."It says that if IS allows all civilians to leave, SDF would in return allow wounded IS militants safe passage to other areas nearby under their control.The council urged IS to send a delegati...

Longtime Pueblo grocer, WWII veteran dies at age 90 - Pueblo Chieftain

Monday, July 04, 2016

Central High School at 17 and then joined the Army to fight in World War II.After time at Fort Logan and at Fort Lewis, Wash., Skufca shipped out and headed overseas in a 38-ship convoy to the Pacific.Skufca, who was featured in The Pueblo Chieftain’s weekly Classic Pueblo series in 2003, started at the landmark store at 920 W. 13th St. in 1946. He became owner in 1960.Recalling his military service, he told The Chieftain: “We were getting ready for the invasion of Ie Shima and having church service on the deck when a Japanese plane came and dropped a bomb on the back of our ship.”He was injured but survived the attack and landed at Ie Shima the next day.Pat Archuleta worked for Skufca for 40 years.“He was a wonderful boss. He taught me a lot. Everybody was very good to him,” Archuleta said Thursday at the store.“He was the friendliest grocer. This was his life. He worked 70 hours a week and sometimes on Sundays. The people in here were more like his family.”Gengenbacher said his generosity showed at the store.“If someone came in and needed something they couldn’t afford, he’d give it to them. He absolutely loved children. They never left without a cookie or some candy,” Gengenbacher.Skufca left the battlefields of World War II with two Bronze Stars and as an honorably discharged, disabled veteran. He returned to Pueblo in 1946.It was then that he came to Star Grocery and Market looking for a job as part of a training program. The owner, a German World War I veteran, hired him on the spot.In 1997, Skufca celebrated 50 years with the market, and said it was not just a milestone for him but for the business, as well.In 2003 he told The C...

Canada evacuating 8000 by air as wildfire rages - The Boston Globe

Monday, June 06, 2016

McMurray, Alberta, Canada. AP  May 06, 2016FORT MCMURRAY, Alberta (AP) — Canadian officials will start moving thousands of people from work camps north of devastated Fort McMurray in a mass highway convoy Friday morning if it is safe from a massive wildfire raging in Alberta.Officials airlifted 8,000 people on Thursday and will continue the airlift Friday, while a mass migration of cars will move south in the morning.The Alberta provincial government, which declared a state of emergency, said more than 1,100 firefighters, 145 helicopters, 138 pieces of heavy equipment and 22 air tankers were fighting the fire, but Chad Morrison, Alberta’s manager of wildfire prevention, said rain is needed.‘‘Let me be clear: air tankers are not going to stop this fire,’’ he said. ‘‘It is going to continue to push through these dry conditions until we actually get some significant rain.’’The fire continued to grow, but it is moving away from Fort McMurray and the rate of its growth has slowed. No rain clouds were expected around Fort McMurray until late Saturday, with 40 percent chance of showers, according to forecasts by Environment Canada.More than 80,000 people have emptied Fort McMurray in the heart of Canada’s oil sands, authorities said.About 25,000 ...