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Highland Memorial Gardens and Chapel Mausoleum

Delta Lane S Poi
Ironton, OH 45680
(740) 377-4865
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Ironton OH Obituaries and Death Notices

Peggy Mickelis

Monday, February 27, 2017

Peggy A. Mickelis, age 73 years, of Ironton, Mo., a former Jefferson City resident, died Wednesday, February 15, 2017 at the Mercy Hospital, Festus, Mo.Peggy was born May 19, 1943 in Jefferson City, Mo. the daughter of John B. and Violet S. Clardy Mickelis. Peggy graduated from Ashland High School in Ashland, Mo. She was a resident of the Jefferson City area for many years prior to moving to Ironton fifteen years ago.A homemaker, Peggy enjoyed sewing and cooking. Most importantly, she cherished time with her family.Survivors include: four children, Bobbie Bailey and her husband Karl of St. James, Mo., Daniel Buck and his wife Rebecca of Ironton, Mo., Angel Menefee of Camdenton, Mo., and Tracy Pistel and her husband Kevin of Lohman, Mo.; two brothers, Daryl Taylor of Atlanta, Mo. and Alan Taylor of Stillwater, Minnesota; four sisters, Linda Gensert of Wardsville, Mo., Tammy Weddington and her husband Fred of Osage City, Mo., Donna Yates and her husband Marty of Kansas City, Mo. and Debbie Polson of Moberly, Mo; eleven gr...

Miles Lord, judge who played pivotal role in Minnesota history, dies at 97 - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, December 12, 2016

Lord’s maverick streak evolved from his working-class roots on Minnesota’s Iron Range. Raised in Crosby and Ironton, he was the second youngest of nine children. He became a Golden Gloves boxer, making it to the state championship in his middle weight category in 1939.He married his childhood sweetheart, Maxine, in 1940. “I tried eloping, but the car broke down,” he recalled in an interview with the Star Tribune.Lord worked as a welder while at the University of Minnesota and graduated from its law school in 1948. Along the way, he campaigned for Humphrey, who was running for mayor of Minneapolis.He, Humphrey, and another young activist, Eugene McCarthy, became friends during the early years of the DFL, after the Democrats merged with the Farmer Labor Party.He was hired as an assistant U.S. attorney in 1951 and made his name as a hard-nosed prosecutor of gangsters and racketeers in the Twin Cities, said attorney Roberta Walburn, a former law clerk.In 1954, he was elected state attorney general. He was re-elected twice, and remained in the post until 1960. From 1961 to 1966, he was U.S. attorney for Minnesota before ascending to the bench.To a great extent, Lord said, his causes depended on the almost accidental nature of the court calendar.One of his proudest decisions was a 1972 permanent injunction in favor of equal rights for women. He ordered the Minnesota State High School League to permit two high school girls who had no girls’ teams at their schools to play on boys’ sports teams.Two months later, Congress passed Title IX legislation prohibiting gender-based discrimination in federally funded education programs.In a case that dominated the headlines for years, he ruled that Reserve Mining Co. should be barred from dumping tons of taconite tailings into Lake Superior from its plant at Silver Bay, Minn., because of the health risks.As a judge, Lord tended to side with the underdog. “He thought the decks were stacked in favor of the rich and powerful and set out to balance the scales of justice for the little guy,” Walburn said.In 1977, with 14,000 steelworkers on strike on the Iron Range, Lord ordered the steel companies to continue to pay the strikers’ health insurance. “Maybe this is war,” Lord said, “but even in war, they have a Geneva conference.” He peered toward the table where the lawyers for the steel firms sat. “Spare the women and children,” he said.In a landmark ruling in 1980, Lord sided with environmentalists, ordering a continued ban of motorboats in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area.In 1983, he became embroiled in lawsuits brought by women who had suffered severe injuries from using the Dalkon Shield intrauterine birth control device. He compelled the manufacturer, A.H. Robins, to produce thousands of pages of internal corporate documents.After handling the last 23 cases brought before him for settlement, he ordered the company’s top three executives to appear in his courtroom and accused them of “corporate irresponsibility at its meanest.”In an admonition reported nationally, Lord told them, “Under your direction, your company has in fact continued to allow women, tens of thousands of them, to wear this device — a deadly depth charge in their wombs, ready to explode at any time.”Lord is survived by daughters Priscilla and Virginia. His son Jim Lord, a former Minnesota state treasurer, died in 2008. His wife, Maxine, died in 2009, and another son, Mick, who worked with him in his private practice, died in 2012.A public memorial will be held at 4 p.m.

Lawrence County, Ohio judge loses battle with ALS - WSAZ - WSAZ-TV

Monday, August 01, 2016

IRONTON, Ohio, (WSAZ) -Lawrence County, Ohio Common Pleas Judge D. Scott Bowling died Sunday following a four year battle with ALS.Judge Bowling, 50, died at his home, according to his secretary.Bowling worked up to his passing, but had not been in the office the past couple of weeks. He was under hospice care at the time of his death.Funeral arrangement are expected to be released later Monday.Bowling was appointed to bench in 2007 by then Ohio Governor, Ted Strickland.

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Peggy Mickelis

Monday, February 27, 2017

Peggy A. Mickelis, age 73 years, of Ironton, Mo., a former Jefferson City resident, died Wednesday, February 15, 2017 at the Mercy Hospital, Festus, Mo.Peggy was born May 19, 1943 in Jefferson City, Mo. the daughter of John B. and Violet S. Clardy Mickelis. Peggy graduated from Ashland High School in Ashland, Mo. She was a resident of the Jefferson City area for many years prior to moving to Ironton fifteen years ago.A homemaker, Peggy enjoyed sewing and cooking. Most importantly, she cherished time with her family.Survivors include: four children, Bobbie Bailey and her husband Karl of St. James, Mo., Daniel Buck and his wife Rebecca of Ironton, Mo., Angel Menefee of Camdenton, Mo., and Tracy Pistel and her husband Kevin of Lohman, Mo.; two brothers, Daryl Taylor of Atlanta, Mo. and Alan Taylor of Stillwater, Minnesota; four sisters, Linda Gensert of Wardsville, Mo., Tammy Weddington and her husband Fred of Osage City, Mo., Donna Yates and her husband Marty of Kansas City, Mo. and Debbie Polson of Moberly, Mo; eleven gr...

Miles Lord, judge who played pivotal role in Minnesota history, dies at 97 - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, December 12, 2016

Lord’s maverick streak evolved from his working-class roots on Minnesota’s Iron Range. Raised in Crosby and Ironton, he was the second youngest of nine children. He became a Golden Gloves boxer, making it to the state championship in his middle weight category in 1939.He married his childhood sweetheart, Maxine, in 1940. “I tried eloping, but the car broke down,” he recalled in an interview with the Star Tribune.Lord worked as a welder while at the University of Minnesota and graduated from its law school in 1948. Along the way, he campaigned for Humphrey, who was running for mayor of Minneapolis.He, Humphrey, and another young activist, Eugene McCarthy, became friends during the early years of the DFL, after the Democrats merged with the Farmer Labor Party.He was hired as an assistant U.S. attorney in 1951 and made his name as a hard-nosed prosecutor of gangsters and racketeers in the Twin Cities, said attorney Roberta Walburn, a former law clerk.In 1954, he was elected state attorney general. He was re-elected twice, and remained in the post until 1960. From 1961 to 1966, he was U.S. attorney for Minnesota before ascending to the bench.To a great extent, Lord said, his causes depended on the almost accidental nature of the court calendar.One of his proudest decisions was a 1972 permanent injunction in favor of equal rights for women. He ordered the Minnesota State High School League to permit two high school girls who had no girls’ teams at their schools to play on boys’ sports teams.Two months later, Congress passed Title IX legislation prohibiting gender-based discrimination in federally funded education programs.In a case that dominated the headlines for years, he ruled that Reserve Mining Co. should be barred from dumping tons of taconite tailings into Lake Superior from its plant at Silver Bay, Minn., because of the health risks.As a judge, Lord tended to side with the underdog. “He thought the decks were stacked in favor of the rich and powerful and set out to balance the scales of justice for the little guy,” Walburn said.In 1977, with 14,000 steelworkers on strike on the Iron Range, Lord ordered the steel companies to continue to pay the strikers’ health insurance. “Maybe this is war,” Lord said, “but even in war, they have a Geneva conference.” He peered toward the table where the lawyers for the steel firms sat. “Spare the women and children,” he said.In a landmark ruling in 1980, Lord sided with environmentalists, ordering a continued ban of motorboats in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area.In 1983, he became embroiled in lawsuits brought by women who had suffered severe injuries from using the Dalkon Shield intrauterine birth control device. He compelled the manufacturer, A.H. Robins, to produce thousands of pages of internal corporate documents.After handling the last 23 cases brought before him for settlement, he ordered the company’s top three executives to appear in his courtroom and accused them of “corporate irresponsibility at its meanest.”In an admonition reported nationally, Lord told them, “Under your direction, your company has in fact continued to allow women, tens of thousands of them, to wear this device — a deadly depth charge in their wombs, ready to explode at any time.”Lord is survived by daughters Priscilla and Virginia. His son Jim Lord, a former Minnesota state treasurer, died in 2008. His wife, Maxine, died in 2009, and another son, Mick, who worked with him in his private practice, died in 2012.A public memorial will be held at 4 p.m.

Lawrence County, Ohio judge loses battle with ALS - WSAZ - WSAZ-TV

Monday, August 01, 2016

IRONTON, Ohio, (WSAZ) -Lawrence County, Ohio Common Pleas Judge D. Scott Bowling died Sunday following a four year battle with ALS.Judge Bowling, 50, died at his home, according to his secretary.Bowling worked up to his passing, but had not been in the office the past couple of weeks. He was under hospice care at the time of his death.Funeral arrangement are expected to be released later Monday.Bowling was appointed to bench in 2007 by then Ohio Governor, Ted Strickland.