Lima OH Funeral Homes

Lima OH funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Chamberlain Huckeriede Funeral Home , Chiles and Sons Laman Funeral Homes Lewis Funeral Directors , Johns Memorials by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Lima funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Chamberlain Huckeriede Funeral Home

920 North Cable Road
Lima, OH 45805
(419) 229-2300
Chamberlain Huckeriede Funeral Home funeral flowers

Chiles and Sons Laman Funeral Homes

1170 Shawnee Road
Lima, OH 45805
(419) 228-4311
Chiles and Sons Laman Funeral Homes funeral flowers

Chiles and Sons Laman Funeral Homes Lewis Funeral Directors

828 Bellefontaine Avenue
Lima, OH 45801
(419) 228-5486
Chiles and Sons Laman Funeral Homes Lewis Funeral Directors funeral flowers

Gethsemani Cemetery

2001 Spencerville Road
Lima, OH 45805
(419) 223-1651
Gethsemani Cemetery funeral flowers

Johns Memorials

1305 Allentown Road
Lima, OH 45805
(419) 228-4796
Johns Memorials funeral flowers

Jones-Clark Funeral Home Inc

1302 Oakland Parkway
Lima, OH 45805
(419) 225-5741
Jones-Clark Funeral Home Inc funeral flowers

Lima OH Obituaries and Death Notices

She wanted her ex-husband to die with a happy thought; she told him Trump had been impeached - Washington Post

Monday, May 01, 2017

Michael Elliott was a longtime Democrat and was very interested in politics; a “CNN junkie,” he was appalled by the current political climate. He found President Trump to be a “loathsome individual,” Teresa Elliott said. Asked what, specifically, her ex-husband had said about Trump, she replied, “Nothing that you could print.” [‘Prediction professor’ lays out eight reasons Trump could be impeached] She said she gave her ex-husband the false news because she wanted him to die with a happy thought.Whether Trump would be impeached has been a subject of public discourse since before the November presidential election.Allan J. Lichtman, an American University historian who predicted that Trump would become president, had already made the case for his impeachment. He told The Post's Peter W. Stevenson in September that if elected, the real estate mogul would be impeached by a Republican Congress that would rather have a President Pence.Now, just a few months removed from when Trump took office, Lichtman has written a book: “The Case for Impeachment.”Professor Allan J. Lichtman of American University was one of the few professional prognosticators to get President Trump's election win right. In his new book, he says Trump could be impeached. (Peter Stevenson/The Washington Post)“This one is not based on a system; it's just my gut. They don't want Trump as president, because they can't control him. He's unpredictable. They'd love to have Pence — an absolutely down-the-line, conservative, controllable Republican,” Lichtman told The Post. “And I'm quite certain Trump will give someone grounds for impeachment, either by doing something that endangers national security or because it helps his pocketbook.”A February national poll by Public Policy Polling found that Americans are evenly divided about impeaching Trump. Two weeks earlier, 35 percent favored impeachment. That number went up to 46 percent by Feb. 10.READ MORE:Professor who predicted 30 years of presidential elections correctly called a Trump win in SeptemberThe campaign to impeach President Trump has begunImpeach Trump? Most Democrats already say ‘yes.’...

Century-old bell on its way home to Old Belgian Church - Great Falls Tribune

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Low Countries of Western Europe to establish a new Catholic colony roughly nine miles east of Valier.Despite few English language skills, rocky soils, little knowledge of Montana’s climate and growing conditions and an early succession of failed crops, the Belgian and Dutch families who settled below what later came to be known as “Belgian Hill” survived and ultimately prospered.The same cannot be said of the church they built by faith and determination, one year before the outbreak of World War I. .oembed-asset-link { border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1; } .oembed-link-anchor { display: block; clear: both; } p.oembed-link-desc { font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px; font-family: 'Futura Today Light'; text-align: left; line-height: 120%; }For 50 years, the bell atop Sacred Heart Church (now more commonly known as the “Old Belgian Church”) rang to celebrate the joy of weddings, tolled to mourn the passing of loved ones, and called the faithful to gather for Sunday Mass.Beginning in the 1950s, attendance at the Old Belgian Church began to decline. Insufficient financial support prompted the Diocese of Helena to close the church in 1963.A few years later, the church bell Monsignor Day had donated with such hope and promise was removed from the Old Belgian Church belfry and carefully placed in a newly built bell tower outside Holy Cross Catholic Church in Dupuyer.One century on, and the bell of Monsignor Day has now served a double life – residing in equal parts at both the Old Belgian Church and at Holy Cross. The question has now become, where is its rightful home?In 2001 a group of descendants of the original Belgian and Dutch colonists came together to rebuild a perimeter fence built to keep wandering cows out of the Old Belgian Church cemetery. It was then that they realized how far into disrepair the long empty church had fallen.The roof was sagging and leaking badly. The plaster lining the church walls had begun to peel away, and its ceiling was close to collapse. Pigeons, mice and bees had made a wreck of the interior.meta itemprop="width" c...

John Walsh, co-founder COPD and Alpha-1 foundations, dies at 68 - Miami Herald

Monday, March 13, 2017

Alpha-1. When the NIH study ended in 1995, the NIH developed a protein therapy. Walsh, born in Arlington, Massachusetts, had been living in Miami for two years for its climate. While attending a support group in West Palm Beach, he raised money to produce a CD that provided information on Alpha-1.He was determined to do more. That same year, Walsh and two fellow Alphas, as they called themselves, Susan Stanley and Sandy Linsey, created the Alpha-1 Foundation in Coconut Grove, followed by AlphaNet, a disease and health management company that provides services for people with the deficiency.The nonprofits quickly flourished with grants, matching funds, advocacy and influence, leading to research centers nationwide, including at Harvard, a gene therapy program for the lung and liver at University of Florida and University of California at San Diego, and an Alpha-1 registry at the Medical University at South Carolina. The nonprofits also have raised millions for research. “Our mission is to put ourselves out of business,” Walsh told the Miami Herald in 2005. “We want to cure Alpha-1.”Here was a man who was going to make big changes in the way the world thought about COPD and in my life as a patient. He was determined to draw attention to the disease, to erase the stigma of being diagnosed, to encourage patients to become active and to become involved in research.Karen Deitemeyer’s post on the COPD Foundation website.A year earlier, in 2004, Walsh had the same mission when he co-founded and became the first president of the COPD Foundation in Coconut Grove, with a second office in Washington. He followed with the COPD Advocacy program and the Congressional COPD Caucus to push for more funding for research and patient access. In 2014, Walsh, who lived in Coral Gables, was elected to the National Health Council’s board of directors.“John was a former Army Ranger. Though he was afraid of heights, he volunteered for Airborne School and became a paratrooper, because parachute jumping out of planes is a required skill for a ranger. That should tell you a lot about the strength of his character, will and commitment to mission,” said Marcia Ritchie, the Alpha-1 Foundation’s chief operating officer.“John had that astonishing power that people get when they have high energy and passion for something and a willingness to devote their life to it,” Campbell said. “He was starting from a tiny patient base. He had no power base. Started with little funding. But he built the core organization of the Alpha-1 world and then the core foundation of the COPD world. That’s an astonishing number of achievements in a little over 20 years.”Walsh is survived by his wife Diane, daughter Linda, granddaughter Lily, his brother Fred, and sisters Susan Ferro and Judy Walsh. The family plans a private celebration of life.

Reverend Raymond J. Nyquist - Billings Gazette

Monday, March 06, 2017

Parish in Medicine Lake until Feb. 1985. After a five month sabbatical leave, he was the pastor of St. Mathias in Moore from July 1985 to July 1988. His next assignment was to pastor St. Rose of Lima Parish in Stanford while still serving in Moore. He remained in those positions until becoming the pastor of Blessed Sacrament Parish in Black Eagle in July, 1993. He remained there, even after attaining retirement status in 2000 until July 2009.Then, at the age of 82, he moved to Billings, where he helped out in area parishes as needed, including serving for over a year as the temporary pastor of St. Benedict Parish in Roundup and its missions. In 2013, he moved back to Great Falls to live in residence at Corpus Christi Parish and to enjoy retirement while hearing confessions and concelebrating Mass in that parish community.Fr. Ray’s faith life was centered on his love of Jesus in the Eucharist and his devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. He greatly expanded Eucharistic Adoration in Great Falls. He founded Great Falls Catholics for Life and was the chaplain for 40 Days for Life locally. He was an avid supporter of the Marian Movement of Priests, the Legion of Mary and the Diocesan Council of Catholic Women. He invited the Neocatechumenal Way into the Great Falls-Billings Diocese.He was active in ministering to prisoners at the County Adult Detention Center and the elderly in a local nursing home/assisted living facility. He always did what he could to help those in need and advocated for them with local agencies on many occasions. He was firm in his belief that, if one helps another in need, he is helping Christ Himself.Fr. Ray loved his family dearly. He kept in close touch with his parents, his sister and brother and their families. His father, “Papa Ray,” lived with him for many of the last years of his life. He had a great sense of humor and enjoyed telling corny jokes. Gardening was one of his favorite pastimes. He was a simple, humble, caring man of God who strove to practice what he preached. He would often say, “If you learn to laugh at yourself, you’ll be laughing all day.”Fr. Ray is survived by his sister, Helene (John) Houghton; nephews Dawson Nyquist, Terry (Teresa) Houghton, Chris Houghton, Mark (Jennifer) Houghton, and Kevin (Jenny) Houghton; nieces Charlotte (Rodrigo) Spiegel, Fran Nyquist, Roselyn Granger, Patrice (Frank) Patrinostro, Alyssa Nyquist, Margaret (Nick) O’Connor and Stephanie (John) Hudson; and thirty great-nephews and great-nieces.He was preceded in death by his parents, his brother Charles, and two nephews.

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She wanted her ex-husband to die with a happy thought; she told him Trump had been impeached - Washington Post

Monday, May 01, 2017

Michael Elliott was a longtime Democrat and was very interested in politics; a “CNN junkie,” he was appalled by the current political climate. He found President Trump to be a “loathsome individual,” Teresa Elliott said. Asked what, specifically, her ex-husband had said about Trump, she replied, “Nothing that you could print.” [‘Prediction professor’ lays out eight reasons Trump could be impeached] She said she gave her ex-husband the false news because she wanted him to die with a happy thought.Whether Trump would be impeached has been a subject of public discourse since before the November presidential election.Allan J. Lichtman, an American University historian who predicted that Trump would become president, had already made the case for his impeachment. He told The Post's Peter W. Stevenson in September that if elected, the real estate mogul would be impeached by a Republican Congress that would rather have a President Pence.Now, just a few months removed from when Trump took office, Lichtman has written a book: “The Case for Impeachment.”Professor Allan J. Lichtman of American University was one of the few professional prognosticators to get President Trump's election win right. In his new book, he says Trump could be impeached. (Peter Stevenson/The Washington Post)“This one is not based on a system; it's just my gut. They don't want Trump as president, because they can't control him. He's unpredictable. They'd love to have Pence — an absolutely down-the-line, conservative, controllable Republican,” Lichtman told The Post. “And I'm quite certain Trump will give someone grounds for impeachment, either by doing something that endangers national security or because it helps his pocketbook.”A February national poll by Public Policy Polling found that Americans are evenly divided about impeaching Trump. Two weeks earlier, 35 percent favored impeachment. That number went up to 46 percent by Feb. 10.READ MORE:Professor who predicted 30 years of presidential elections correctly called a Trump win in SeptemberThe campaign to impeach President Trump has begunImpeach Trump? Most Democrats already say ‘yes.’...

Century-old bell on its way home to Old Belgian Church - Great Falls Tribune

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Low Countries of Western Europe to establish a new Catholic colony roughly nine miles east of Valier.Despite few English language skills, rocky soils, little knowledge of Montana’s climate and growing conditions and an early succession of failed crops, the Belgian and Dutch families who settled below what later came to be known as “Belgian Hill” survived and ultimately prospered.The same cannot be said of the church they built by faith and determination, one year before the outbreak of World War I. .oembed-asset-link { border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1; } .oembed-link-anchor { display: block; clear: both; } p.oembed-link-desc { font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px; font-family: 'Futura Today Light'; text-align: left; line-height: 120%; }For 50 years, the bell atop Sacred Heart Church (now more commonly known as the “Old Belgian Church”) rang to celebrate the joy of weddings, tolled to mourn the passing of loved ones, and called the faithful to gather for Sunday Mass.Beginning in the 1950s, attendance at the Old Belgian Church began to decline. Insufficient financial support prompted the Diocese of Helena to close the church in 1963.A few years later, the church bell Monsignor Day had donated with such hope and promise was removed from the Old Belgian Church belfry and carefully placed in a newly built bell tower outside Holy Cross Catholic Church in Dupuyer.One century on, and the bell of Monsignor Day has now served a double life – residing in equal parts at both the Old Belgian Church and at Holy Cross. The question has now become, where is its rightful home?In 2001 a group of descendants of the original Belgian and Dutch colonists came together to rebuild a perimeter fence built to keep wandering cows out of the Old Belgian Church cemetery. It was then that they realized how far into disrepair the long empty church had fallen.The roof was sagging and leaking badly. The plaster lining the church walls had begun to peel away, and its ceiling was close to collapse. Pigeons, mice and bees had made a wreck of the interior.meta itemprop="width" c...

John Walsh, co-founder COPD and Alpha-1 foundations, dies at 68 - Miami Herald

Monday, March 13, 2017

Alpha-1. When the NIH study ended in 1995, the NIH developed a protein therapy. Walsh, born in Arlington, Massachusetts, had been living in Miami for two years for its climate. While attending a support group in West Palm Beach, he raised money to produce a CD that provided information on Alpha-1.He was determined to do more. That same year, Walsh and two fellow Alphas, as they called themselves, Susan Stanley and Sandy Linsey, created the Alpha-1 Foundation in Coconut Grove, followed by AlphaNet, a disease and health management company that provides services for people with the deficiency.The nonprofits quickly flourished with grants, matching funds, advocacy and influence, leading to research centers nationwide, including at Harvard, a gene therapy program for the lung and liver at University of Florida and University of California at San Diego, and an Alpha-1 registry at the Medical University at South Carolina. The nonprofits also have raised millions for research. “Our mission is to put ourselves out of business,” Walsh told the Miami Herald in 2005. “We want to cure Alpha-1.”Here was a man who was going to make big changes in the way the world thought about COPD and in my life as a patient. He was determined to draw attention to the disease, to erase the stigma of being diagnosed, to encourage patients to become active and to become involved in research.Karen Deitemeyer’s post on the COPD Foundation website.A year earlier, in 2004, Walsh had the same mission when he co-founded and became the first president of the COPD Foundation in Coconut Grove, with a second office in Washington. He followed with the COPD Advocacy program and the Congressional COPD Caucus to push for more funding for research and patient access. In 2014, Walsh, who lived in Coral Gables, was elected to the National Health Council’s board of directors.“John was a former Army Ranger. Though he was afraid of heights, he volunteered for Airborne School and became a paratrooper, because parachute jumping out of planes is a required skill for a ranger. That should tell you a lot about the strength of his character, will and commitment to mission,” said Marcia Ritchie, the Alpha-1 Foundation’s chief operating officer.“John had that astonishing power that people get when they have high energy and passion for something and a willingness to devote their life to it,” Campbell said. “He was starting from a tiny patient base. He had no power base. Started with little funding. But he built the core organization of the Alpha-1 world and then the core foundation of the COPD world. That’s an astonishing number of achievements in a little over 20 years.”Walsh is survived by his wife Diane, daughter Linda, granddaughter Lily, his brother Fred, and sisters Susan Ferro and Judy Walsh. The family plans a private celebration of life.

Reverend Raymond J. Nyquist - Billings Gazette

Monday, March 06, 2017

Parish in Medicine Lake until Feb. 1985. After a five month sabbatical leave, he was the pastor of St. Mathias in Moore from July 1985 to July 1988. His next assignment was to pastor St. Rose of Lima Parish in Stanford while still serving in Moore. He remained in those positions until becoming the pastor of Blessed Sacrament Parish in Black Eagle in July, 1993. He remained there, even after attaining retirement status in 2000 until July 2009.Then, at the age of 82, he moved to Billings, where he helped out in area parishes as needed, including serving for over a year as the temporary pastor of St. Benedict Parish in Roundup and its missions. In 2013, he moved back to Great Falls to live in residence at Corpus Christi Parish and to enjoy retirement while hearing confessions and concelebrating Mass in that parish community.Fr. Ray’s faith life was centered on his love of Jesus in the Eucharist and his devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. He greatly expanded Eucharistic Adoration in Great Falls. He founded Great Falls Catholics for Life and was the chaplain for 40 Days for Life locally. He was an avid supporter of the Marian Movement of Priests, the Legion of Mary and the Diocesan Council of Catholic Women. He invited the Neocatechumenal Way into the Great Falls-Billings Diocese.He was active in ministering to prisoners at the County Adult Detention Center and the elderly in a local nursing home/assisted living facility. He always did what he could to help those in need and advocated for them with local agencies on many occasions. He was firm in his belief that, if one helps another in need, he is helping Christ Himself.Fr. Ray loved his family dearly. He kept in close touch with his parents, his sister and brother and their families. His father, “Papa Ray,” lived with him for many of the last years of his life. He had a great sense of humor and enjoyed telling corny jokes. Gardening was one of his favorite pastimes. He was a simple, humble, caring man of God who strove to practice what he preached. He would often say, “If you learn to laugh at yourself, you’ll be laughing all day.”Fr. Ray is survived by his sister, Helene (John) Houghton; nephews Dawson Nyquist, Terry (Teresa) Houghton, Chris Houghton, Mark (Jennifer) Houghton, and Kevin (Jenny) Houghton; nieces Charlotte (Rodrigo) Spiegel, Fran Nyquist, Roselyn Granger, Patrice (Frank) Patrinostro, Alyssa Nyquist, Margaret (Nick) O’Connor and Stephanie (John) Hudson; and thirty great-nephews and great-nieces.He was preceded in death by his parents, his brother Charles, and two nephews.