Toronto OH Funeral Homes

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Altmeyer Funeral Homes

302 Main Street
Toronto, OH 43964
(740) 537-1234
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Clarke Funeral Home Toronto Pre Arrangement Specialists

302 Main Street
Toronto, OH 43964
(740) 537-1595
Clarke Funeral Home Toronto Pre Arrangement Specialists funeral flowers

Toronto OH Obituaries and Death Notices

DONALD E. KELLEY - Youngstown Vindicator

Monday, May 01, 2017

Dylan, and Janis Joplin. Don is survived by a son, Arian G. Kelley of Wilmington, N.C.; a daughter, Megan K. Small of Kannapolis, N.C.; three sisters, Margaret Brown of Florida, Winifred Kiersey of Toronto, Ohio, and Beth Parker of Kent; and two brothers, William Kelley of Mantua, and Lawrence Kelley of Aiken, S.C. He also leaves behind his four grandchildren, Chandler, Cora, Sophia, and Evan; and many nieces, nephews, and cousins, all of whom he dearly loved. Requiescat In Pacem. He was preceded in death by his parents and a brother, Michael Kelley. In accordance with Don?s wishes, there will be no funeral services or calling hours. Arrangements for Mr. Kelley are being provided by the Carl W. Hall Funeral Home, 533 N. Park Ave. in Warren. Please visit www.carlwhall.com to view this obituary and to send condolences to the Kelley family.

Innis Anne Nolan left her mark on Stouffville - YorkRegion.com

Monday, April 03, 2017

A sister-in-law, Eulah Williamson, 100, resides in Markhaven Nursing Home. Following graduation from Markham High, Innis enrolled at Toronto Normal School and later taught at the one-room Armitage Public School, Aurora. It was while attending Markham High that Innis and Charles Nolan first met. They were married in 1941. The beautiful garden wedding was conducted at her parents’ home after which they moved to a new residence built by her dad and brother on Duchess Street, Stouffville. Innis continued to live there the remainder of her days. Charles died in 1992. Although privacy was important, Innis enjoyed a wide circle of friends. One of these was Lillian Abraham with whom she shared many rounds of golf at Stouffville’s Sleepy Hollow. In later years, ‘Boy’, a beautiful stray cat became a constant companion. From 1942 to 1965 Innis served as organist at Stouffville United Church. She and choir director, the late Lorne Boadway, worked closely together. For Innis, an immaculate backyard bordered with colourful flowers was a personal treasure. Florets, many of them wild, were permanently pressed between pages of old telephone books. They then became distinctive signatures on cards and letters. She also compiled hundreds of photo albums and accumulated many antiques. Because her husband, owner and publisher of the Stouffville Tribune, held prominent positions with both the provincial and Canadian newspaper assoc...

Best-selling author John Bradshaw remembered for changing the conversation about addiction - CultureMap Houston

Monday, March 27, 2017

Bradshaw studied for the Roman Catholic priesthood, earning a B.A. degree in Sacred Theology and an M.A. degree in philosophy from the University of Toronto in 1963. Six years later he returned to Houston, doing graduate work in psychology and religion at Rice University, which led to his career as a counselor and public speaker in the area of addiction. Bradshaw is survived by his wife, Karen Mabray Bradshaw, his children, John Bradshaw Jr. and Ariel Harper Bradshaw, and two step-children Brad Isaacs and Brenda Isaacs Booth. His family will receive guests Friday, May 13, from 5 - 8 pm, at Bradshaw-Carter Funeral Home, 1734 West Alabama St. The funeral service will be held at 10 am Saturday, May 14,  at St. John the Divine Episcopal Church, 2450 River Oaks Blvd. A reception will follow in Sumners Hall. The burial will follow at Earthman's Resthaven, 13102 North Freeway in Houston.

Obituary: U's Robert Kane, renowned expert on aging, never stopped pushing for change - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, March 27, 2017

Minnesota to test new ways of providing housing and services for older and disabled people.Born in New York City, Kane met his wife while they were freshmen at the University of Toronto. He graduated from Harvard University’s medical school and arrived in Minnesota in 1985 to become dean of the U’s School of Public Health, a post he held for five years. He and Rosalie raised three daughters — Miranda, Ingrid and Kate.Over four decades, Kane became known for his withering critiques and scientific analysis of aging and long-term care systems in the U.S. and abroad, writing or editing more than 35 books and 500 journal articles. Those in the aging field sometimes referred to Kane as their “frenemy” for his relentless push against the status quo and failure to sugarcoat his opinions. But Kane’s hard work and dedication always earned respect.“The guy was very much driven by excellence,” said John Finnegan, dean of the U’s School of Health, who talked to Kane just last week of creating a universitywide center on aging to honor his legacy. “He was driven by next set of research questions. You could say in many ways he did not suffer fools gladly.”Author and explorer Dan Buettner called Kane the “godfather of ‘The Blue Zones,’?” Buettner’s bestselling work on the areas of the world where people live the longest, healthiest lives. Kane introduced Buettner to the nation’s top demographers and scientists at the National Institute on Aging, and helped secure a grant that led to formative early Blue Zones research. Kane considered Buettner a key ally in his long-term care “rethink tank” project.“He always kept me on the straight-and-narrow scientifically,” said Buettner, who met Kane regularly for breakfast at the Lowry in Minneapolis.For all Kane’s scholarly work, it was the 2005 book he wrote with his sister, Candy West, that touched the hearts of many and turned Kane from a researcher into an activist.The book, “It Shouldn’t Be This Way: The Failure of Long-term Care,” chronicled the siblings’ difficult three-year experience caring for their mother after she had a stroke. “It was one thing to write about as a scholar and hypothesize,” said his sister, a retired Long Island schoolteacher. “But when you’re going through it, it’s pretty mind-blowing. … He was so dedicated to the idea that this system should work.”...

Fred J. “Ducky” Terpenning - Harrison News Herald

Monday, March 06, 2017

Honda Goldwing motorcycle. He also loved horses and enjoyed mowing.Surviving are his children Raymond “Butch” (Cathy) Terpenning of Toronto and Douglas (Karen) Terpenning and Kelly Jo Barahona both of Polk Co. Florida; a brother Paul Terpenning of Wintersville; sisters Sandy Terpenning of Smithfield and Linda (Lyle) Gross of Warren; a special friend Marjorie Scott of Scio; grandchildren Nick (Victoria) Terpenning, Jennifer (Joshua) Meyer, Katie (Ricky) Stripling, Chelsey (Roy) King, Janae Checole Ray, Lucas Terpenning, Charlie Ullery and Alex Terpenning and eight great grandchildren.Fred was preceded in death by brothers Bobby, Raymond and Jack Terpenning and sisters Betty Walrath and Joanne Meneely.   Services will be held Thursday at 11 a..m. in Koch Funeral Home, Scio with Rev. Hester Hudson officiating. Burial will follow in Grandview Cemetery, Scio. Friends may call Wednesday from 4-7 p.m. and Thursday from 10-11 a.m. prior to the service at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to New Rumley United Methodist Church c/o Sandy Knowles, 1187 William-Penn Blvd., Hartville, OH 44632.www.kochfuneral.com...

O'Connor's funeral business stays true to its principles - The Catholic Register

Monday, February 06, 2017

And I think as a Catholic, Christ’s teachings has made me well-equipped in this business.”Feb. 7 will mark the 50th anniversary of the Paul O’Connor Funeral Home in Scarborough, in Toronto’s east end. O’Connor said it feels like he and his wife, Margaret, haven’t really stopped working since they first opened the building in 1967. Both are now approaching their 90s, but they still come in to supervise the daily operations of the funeral home, which is why the anniversary came as a bit of a shock.“What I have now, I never dreamed I would have 50 years ago when I first started,” said O’Connor. “I’m very pleased with what we’ve done and it’s well beyond my dreams.”O’Connor never saw himself doing anything else. His father was also a funeral director. The family lived above the funeral home and growing up, he and his four siblings would help run the business.He remembers working at a funeral Mass at 7 a.m., before being dropped off at school. After school, he and his two older brothers would help their father pick up the bodies from a home or the morgue, dress the bodies and set up the caskets.“I really didn’t think anything of it. That was the way we were brought up,” said O’Connor. “When I was in high school, I didn’t have to bring a letter or anything because my teachers would all know my dad needed me on funerals on particular days of the week. I found out 30 years later that a lot of the students didn’t like me because I got to miss school.”O’Connor officially became his father’s apprentice at the age of 18. He was earning about $5 a week. A few years later, he married Margaret i...

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DONALD E. KELLEY - Youngstown Vindicator

Monday, May 01, 2017

Dylan, and Janis Joplin. Don is survived by a son, Arian G. Kelley of Wilmington, N.C.; a daughter, Megan K. Small of Kannapolis, N.C.; three sisters, Margaret Brown of Florida, Winifred Kiersey of Toronto, Ohio, and Beth Parker of Kent; and two brothers, William Kelley of Mantua, and Lawrence Kelley of Aiken, S.C. He also leaves behind his four grandchildren, Chandler, Cora, Sophia, and Evan; and many nieces, nephews, and cousins, all of whom he dearly loved. Requiescat In Pacem. He was preceded in death by his parents and a brother, Michael Kelley. In accordance with Don?s wishes, there will be no funeral services or calling hours. Arrangements for Mr. Kelley are being provided by the Carl W. Hall Funeral Home, 533 N. Park Ave. in Warren. Please visit www.carlwhall.com to view this obituary and to send condolences to the Kelley family.

Innis Anne Nolan left her mark on Stouffville - YorkRegion.com

Monday, April 03, 2017

A sister-in-law, Eulah Williamson, 100, resides in Markhaven Nursing Home. Following graduation from Markham High, Innis enrolled at Toronto Normal School and later taught at the one-room Armitage Public School, Aurora. It was while attending Markham High that Innis and Charles Nolan first met. They were married in 1941. The beautiful garden wedding was conducted at her parents’ home after which they moved to a new residence built by her dad and brother on Duchess Street, Stouffville. Innis continued to live there the remainder of her days. Charles died in 1992. Although privacy was important, Innis enjoyed a wide circle of friends. One of these was Lillian Abraham with whom she shared many rounds of golf at Stouffville’s Sleepy Hollow. In later years, ‘Boy’, a beautiful stray cat became a constant companion. From 1942 to 1965 Innis served as organist at Stouffville United Church. She and choir director, the late Lorne Boadway, worked closely together. For Innis, an immaculate backyard bordered with colourful flowers was a personal treasure. Florets, many of them wild, were permanently pressed between pages of old telephone books. They then became distinctive signatures on cards and letters. She also compiled hundreds of photo albums and accumulated many antiques. Because her husband, owner and publisher of the Stouffville Tribune, held prominent positions with both the provincial and Canadian newspaper assoc...

Best-selling author John Bradshaw remembered for changing the conversation about addiction - CultureMap Houston

Monday, March 27, 2017

Bradshaw studied for the Roman Catholic priesthood, earning a B.A. degree in Sacred Theology and an M.A. degree in philosophy from the University of Toronto in 1963. Six years later he returned to Houston, doing graduate work in psychology and religion at Rice University, which led to his career as a counselor and public speaker in the area of addiction. Bradshaw is survived by his wife, Karen Mabray Bradshaw, his children, John Bradshaw Jr. and Ariel Harper Bradshaw, and two step-children Brad Isaacs and Brenda Isaacs Booth. His family will receive guests Friday, May 13, from 5 - 8 pm, at Bradshaw-Carter Funeral Home, 1734 West Alabama St. The funeral service will be held at 10 am Saturday, May 14,  at St. John the Divine Episcopal Church, 2450 River Oaks Blvd. A reception will follow in Sumners Hall. The burial will follow at Earthman's Resthaven, 13102 North Freeway in Houston.

Obituary: U's Robert Kane, renowned expert on aging, never stopped pushing for change - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, March 27, 2017

Minnesota to test new ways of providing housing and services for older and disabled people.Born in New York City, Kane met his wife while they were freshmen at the University of Toronto. He graduated from Harvard University’s medical school and arrived in Minnesota in 1985 to become dean of the U’s School of Public Health, a post he held for five years. He and Rosalie raised three daughters — Miranda, Ingrid and Kate.Over four decades, Kane became known for his withering critiques and scientific analysis of aging and long-term care systems in the U.S. and abroad, writing or editing more than 35 books and 500 journal articles. Those in the aging field sometimes referred to Kane as their “frenemy” for his relentless push against the status quo and failure to sugarcoat his opinions. But Kane’s hard work and dedication always earned respect.“The guy was very much driven by excellence,” said John Finnegan, dean of the U’s School of Health, who talked to Kane just last week of creating a universitywide center on aging to honor his legacy. “He was driven by next set of research questions. You could say in many ways he did not suffer fools gladly.”Author and explorer Dan Buettner called Kane the “godfather of ‘The Blue Zones,’?” Buettner’s bestselling work on the areas of the world where people live the longest, healthiest lives. Kane introduced Buettner to the nation’s top demographers and scientists at the National Institute on Aging, and helped secure a grant that led to formative early Blue Zones research. Kane considered Buettner a key ally in his long-term care “rethink tank” project.“He always kept me on the straight-and-narrow scientifically,” said Buettner, who met Kane regularly for breakfast at the Lowry in Minneapolis.For all Kane’s scholarly work, it was the 2005 book he wrote with his sister, Candy West, that touched the hearts of many and turned Kane from a researcher into an activist.The book, “It Shouldn’t Be This Way: The Failure of Long-term Care,” chronicled the siblings’ difficult three-year experience caring for their mother after she had a stroke. “It was one thing to write about as a scholar and hypothesize,” said his sister, a retired Long Island schoolteacher. “But when you’re going through it, it’s pretty mind-blowing. … He was so dedicated to the idea that this system should work.”...

Fred J. “Ducky” Terpenning - Harrison News Herald

Monday, March 06, 2017

Honda Goldwing motorcycle. He also loved horses and enjoyed mowing.Surviving are his children Raymond “Butch” (Cathy) Terpenning of Toronto and Douglas (Karen) Terpenning and Kelly Jo Barahona both of Polk Co. Florida; a brother Paul Terpenning of Wintersville; sisters Sandy Terpenning of Smithfield and Linda (Lyle) Gross of Warren; a special friend Marjorie Scott of Scio; grandchildren Nick (Victoria) Terpenning, Jennifer (Joshua) Meyer, Katie (Ricky) Stripling, Chelsey (Roy) King, Janae Checole Ray, Lucas Terpenning, Charlie Ullery and Alex Terpenning and eight great grandchildren.Fred was preceded in death by brothers Bobby, Raymond and Jack Terpenning and sisters Betty Walrath and Joanne Meneely.   Services will be held Thursday at 11 a..m. in Koch Funeral Home, Scio with Rev. Hester Hudson officiating. Burial will follow in Grandview Cemetery, Scio. Friends may call Wednesday from 4-7 p.m. and Thursday from 10-11 a.m. prior to the service at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to New Rumley United Methodist Church c/o Sandy Knowles, 1187 William-Penn Blvd., Hartville, OH 44632.www.kochfuneral.com...

O'Connor's funeral business stays true to its principles - The Catholic Register

Monday, February 06, 2017

And I think as a Catholic, Christ’s teachings has made me well-equipped in this business.”Feb. 7 will mark the 50th anniversary of the Paul O’Connor Funeral Home in Scarborough, in Toronto’s east end. O’Connor said it feels like he and his wife, Margaret, haven’t really stopped working since they first opened the building in 1967. Both are now approaching their 90s, but they still come in to supervise the daily operations of the funeral home, which is why the anniversary came as a bit of a shock.“What I have now, I never dreamed I would have 50 years ago when I first started,” said O’Connor. “I’m very pleased with what we’ve done and it’s well beyond my dreams.”O’Connor never saw himself doing anything else. His father was also a funeral director. The family lived above the funeral home and growing up, he and his four siblings would help run the business.He remembers working at a funeral Mass at 7 a.m., before being dropped off at school. After school, he and his two older brothers would help their father pick up the bodies from a home or the morgue, dress the bodies and set up the caskets.“I really didn’t think anything of it. That was the way we were brought up,” said O’Connor. “When I was in high school, I didn’t have to bring a letter or anything because my teachers would all know my dad needed me on funerals on particular days of the week. I found out 30 years later that a lot of the students didn’t like me because I got to miss school.”O’Connor officially became his father’s apprentice at the age of 18. He was earning about $5 a week. A few years later, he married Margaret i...