Wheelersburg OH Funeral Homes

Wheelersburg OH funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about D W Swick Funeral Home , Harrison Pyles Funeral Home by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Wheelersburg funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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D W Swick Funeral Home

11901 Gallia Pike Road
Wheelersburg, OH 45694
(740) 574-5050
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Harrison Pyles Funeral Home

11623 Gallia Pike Road
Wheelersburg, OH 45694
(740) 574-2543
Harrison Pyles Funeral Home funeral flowers

Wheelersburg OH Obituaries and Death Notices

Together for 7 decades, St. Cloud couple die 23 hours apart - Florida Times-Union

Monday, April 03, 2017

Walk the Line.”The Bihls’ life was decidedly less volatile, but no less romantic.Elmer Bihl started college during World War II but was called away to work on his father’s vegetable farm in Wheelersburg in southern Ohio, said the couple’s daughter Joanne Minor, 66, of Circleville, Ohio.The Bihls married on Sept. 25, 1948, at St. Peter’s Catholic Church in Wheelersburg, and Elmer Bihl became the owner and manager of Andrew Bihl Sons produce farm, which grew sweet corn, tomatoes and other crops. Ruth Bihl raised their children, Donald, Joanne, Dolores, Paul and Roger, cooked, sewed, gardened and kept house.At the end of the workday, Elmer played badminton, croquet, baseball and pinochle with the children, and the family took occasional trips to Florida, which they loved.“They were wonderful (parents) — strict but fair, said their son Roger Bihl, 57, of St. Cloud.Family, church and hard work were at the center of their world, but the base that supported everything was Elmer and Ruth Bihl’s devotion to each another.When she stood at the stove, sometimes with a smudge of flour on her face, he’d give her a hug and a kiss as he headed back to work on the farm after lunch. Whenever he looked at her, it was obvious that he adored her, their children recalled.Once they moved to Florida, Elmer Bihl took a job as superintendent at a water and sewer utility in Kissimmee, and they joined St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church in St. Cloud, where Ruth was the women’s-group treasurer and baked and crocheted for the holiday bazaar and Elmer was in charge of bingo.After Elmer Bihl retired, it was rare to see either Bihl without the other, whether they were sitting on their porch admiring the yard where Ruth grew her head-turning poinsettias, shopping at the grocery store or entertaining family and friends.Then Ruth Bihl began to develop Alzheimer’s disease, and Elmer learned to do the cooking, cleaning, ironing and other household chores she’d never let him touch in their younger days.When his wife’s dementia reached the point where he could no longer care for her at home, Elmer Bihl arrived at the nursing home every day precisely at noon to sit with her as she ate lunch.“He wanted to make sure that she was taken care of and safe,” said Dudgeon, 38, also of Circleville. “He doted on her every second of every day until he couldn’t do so anymore.”The couple’s joint funeral Mass was March 13 at St. Thomas Aquinas. Their remains will be cremated and laid to rest together at Osceola Memory Gardens. Besides their children, they are survived by seven grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.“It was a true love story,” Minor said.

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Together for 7 decades, St. Cloud couple die 23 hours apart - Florida Times-Union

Monday, April 03, 2017

Walk the Line.”The Bihls’ life was decidedly less volatile, but no less romantic.Elmer Bihl started college during World War II but was called away to work on his father’s vegetable farm in Wheelersburg in southern Ohio, said the couple’s daughter Joanne Minor, 66, of Circleville, Ohio.The Bihls married on Sept. 25, 1948, at St. Peter’s Catholic Church in Wheelersburg, and Elmer Bihl became the owner and manager of Andrew Bihl Sons produce farm, which grew sweet corn, tomatoes and other crops. Ruth Bihl raised their children, Donald, Joanne, Dolores, Paul and Roger, cooked, sewed, gardened and kept house.At the end of the workday, Elmer played badminton, croquet, baseball and pinochle with the children, and the family took occasional trips to Florida, which they loved.“They were wonderful (parents) — strict but fair, said their son Roger Bihl, 57, of St. Cloud.Family, church and hard work were at the center of their world, but the base that supported everything was Elmer and Ruth Bihl’s devotion to each another.When she stood at the stove, sometimes with a smudge of flour on her face, he’d give her a hug and a kiss as he headed back to work on the farm after lunch. Whenever he looked at her, it was obvious that he adored her, their children recalled.Once they moved to Florida, Elmer Bihl took a job as superintendent at a water and sewer utility in Kissimmee, and they joined St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church in St. Cloud, where Ruth was the women’s-group treasurer and baked and crocheted for the holiday bazaar and Elmer was in charge of bingo.After Elmer Bihl retired, it was rare to see either Bihl without the other, whether they were sitting on their porch admiring the yard where Ruth grew her head-turning poinsettias, shopping at the grocery store or entertaining family and friends.Then Ruth Bihl began to develop Alzheimer’s disease, and Elmer learned to do the cooking, cleaning, ironing and other household chores she’d never let him touch in their younger days.When his wife’s dementia reached the point where he could no longer care for her at home, Elmer Bihl arrived at the nursing home every day precisely at noon to sit with her as she ate lunch.“He wanted to make sure that she was taken care of and safe,” said Dudgeon, 38, also of Circleville. “He doted on her every second of every day until he couldn’t do so anymore.”The couple’s joint funeral Mass was March 13 at St. Thomas Aquinas. Their remains will be cremated and laid to rest together at Osceola Memory Gardens. Besides their children, they are survived by seven grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.“It was a true love story,” Minor said.