Perry OK Funeral Homes

Perry OK funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Brown Dugger Funeral Home by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Perry funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

funeral flowers

Funeral Flowers

Express your deepest sympathies - send beautiful flowers today!

sympathy roses

Sympathy Roses

Give comfort and loving support — order a delivery today!

funeral standing sprays
$20 OFF

Standing Sprays

Heart-felt tributes to honor a dear friend or loved one who has passed away

Brown Dugger Funeral Home

1010 North 7th Street
Perry, OK 73077
(580) 336-4444
Brown Dugger Funeral Home funeral flowers

Perry OK Obituaries and Death Notices

Viewing set for Perry Hall soldier killed in Afghanistan - Baltimore Sun

Monday, June 19, 2017

A Perry Hall soldier killed in Afghanistan will be remembered during a public viewing on Saturday. The viewing for Sgt. Eric M. Houck, 25, will be held 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Schimunek Funeral Home, 610 West MacPhail Road in Bel Air.Houck's family also will host a public memorial gathering at noon Sunday at Gunpowder VFW Post 10067, 6309 Ebenezer Road in Middle River.According to an obituary from the funeral home, Houck will be buried at Veterans Cemetery at Fort Campbell, Kentucky.Houck and two others were killed June 10 in the Peka Valley of the Nangarhar Province in Afghanistan, according to the Army. Houck, Sgt. William M. Bays and Cpl. Dillon C. Baldridge were members of the Army's 101st Airborne Division and were supporting Operation Freedom's Sentinel.Houck is a 2009 graduate of Perry Hall High School and is survived by his wife, Samantha Houck, and two young children.Earlier this week, Baltimore County officials said Houck's name will be added to a new memorial in Towson that honors...

The last president of Shimer College - Windy City Times

Monday, June 19, 2017

The interview was only ten minutes old."Over the course of a lifetime, I have come to understand that I cannot pursue ideas alone," she told to Perry Garfinkel and the New York Times in 2013. "Nor can I strive to change the world unless I engage others, whether those who spit on me or those with whom I share my life. I still wrestle with the tensions of differences and uncertainty. As Shimerians say, we steer between reality and utopia."Henking's reality began in 1955 in the small Pennsylvania town of Paoli long before it was annexed as a Philadelphia suburb."My parents met in World War II," she recalled. "My mother was an Irish Protestant. My father was an Irish Catholic. So, it was to the great dismay of some family members. But it was a reasonably happy family. My father was a printer and manual laborer his whole life. My mom was a secretary. We lived in a less wealthy area but I went to good public schools."Serving in World War II had left Henking's father disenchanted with Catholicism. So, she and her elder sister were raised under what she called the "social justice" Protestantism of her mother. It had polar effects on the siblings. While her sister became one of the earliest female Episcopalian Priests, it was as an undergraduate student at Duke University that Henking discovered "I actually and actively hated religion.""My sister and I used to joke that she took God and I took everything else," Henking said.Yet, she decided to major in Religious Studies."I was trying to understand why people are religious," she asserted. "I had emerged from a religious setting to be pretty hostile and fascinated by it. I got very interested in theoretical explanations for why people would believe what I thought was patently untrue. For some, religion is the source of dramatic happiness and social change. For others, it's horrifyingly oppressive and can really hurt people."Despite relishing the academic challenges her chosen course of study provided, Henking recalled having "an emotionally difficult time in college. My parents raised me to think I could do anything I wanted to which turned out not to be true. My father thought I was perfect. Most of the rest of the world does not think that about me or about anyone else."She was in the midst of both the seventies and "a hotbed of lesbian feminism"?also known as the Research Triangle of Duke, North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.The journal Feminary emerged from Chapel Hill."We want to encourage feminist and lesbian organizing in a region whose women suffer greatly in their lack of political power," it's publishers wrote. "We want to provide an audience for Southern lesbians who may not think of themselves as writers but who have important stories to tell?stories that will help to fill the silences that have obscured the truth about our lives and kept us isolated from each other. We want to know who we are. We want to change women's lives.""I can intellectualize anything," Henki...

Samantha M. Galbavi - Argus Press

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Age 25, of Perry, passed away Wednesday, June 7, 2017, at Sparrow Health System.Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Monday, June 12, 2017, at Watkins Brothers Funeral Home, Perry Chapel, with Pastor Bubba Cook officiating. Burial will follow in Roselawn Cemetery in Perry. Family will receive friends from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. Subscription Required An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety. You need an online service to view this article in its entirety. Choose an online service. Current print subscribers Need an account? Create one now.

Obituary: Richard K. Davis - Malibu Times

Monday, May 01, 2017

Big Red” lacrosse team. After graduating with a degree in anthropology, he joined the Army as a 2nd Lieutenant and shipped off to Korea. After returning, he went to work for Sperry Rand Univac in New York City, beginning a career in the computer industry. While there, he also married Jane Kiely on May 4, 1957. In 1958, they moved to Berkeley where he earned an MBA in Operations Research from UC Berkeley and they also had the first of their six children. Upon graduating, they moved to Hinsdale, Ill., where he worked for Touche Ross (now Deloitte & Touche). After two years, they returned to California so that he could go to work for North American Aviation. They took up residence in Malibu. In the early 1970s, he and his business partner acquired Performance Development Corporation. Over the next 40+ years, they would travel the U.S. and the world advising many of the Fortune 500 and various arms of the Federal government. Davis was a longtime board member and president of the LaCosta Homeowners Association, he was president of Malibu Coastal Vision and was an active alumnus backer of the New Mexico Military Institute. He was named the 2004 Citizen of the Year by The Malibu Times. More recently, he organized a concert in Malibu to raise funds for the homeless. In his spare time, he traveled the world, sometimes with his wife and sometimes to exotic surf spots with his kids and other surfing buddies. He was predeceased by his daughter, Sarah, and is survived by his wife of 59 years, five children, 11 grandchildren and one step-grandchild. The funeral mass was held on Saturday, April 1, at Our Lady of Malibu Church.

Funeral Home Flowers

Perry News

Viewing set for Perry Hall soldier killed in Afghanistan - Baltimore Sun

Monday, June 19, 2017

A Perry Hall soldier killed in Afghanistan will be remembered during a public viewing on Saturday. The viewing for Sgt. Eric M. Houck, 25, will be held 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Schimunek Funeral Home, 610 West MacPhail Road in Bel Air.Houck's family also will host a public memorial gathering at noon Sunday at Gunpowder VFW Post 10067, 6309 Ebenezer Road in Middle River.According to an obituary from the funeral home, Houck will be buried at Veterans Cemetery at Fort Campbell, Kentucky.Houck and two others were killed June 10 in the Peka Valley of the Nangarhar Province in Afghanistan, according to the Army. Houck, Sgt. William M. Bays and Cpl. Dillon C. Baldridge were members of the Army's 101st Airborne Division and were supporting Operation Freedom's Sentinel.Houck is a 2009 graduate of Perry Hall High School and is survived by his wife, Samantha Houck, and two young children.Earlier this week, Baltimore County officials said Houck's name will be added to a new memorial in Towson that honors...

The last president of Shimer College - Windy City Times

Monday, June 19, 2017

The interview was only ten minutes old."Over the course of a lifetime, I have come to understand that I cannot pursue ideas alone," she told to Perry Garfinkel and the New York Times in 2013. "Nor can I strive to change the world unless I engage others, whether those who spit on me or those with whom I share my life. I still wrestle with the tensions of differences and uncertainty. As Shimerians say, we steer between reality and utopia."Henking's reality began in 1955 in the small Pennsylvania town of Paoli long before it was annexed as a Philadelphia suburb."My parents met in World War II," she recalled. "My mother was an Irish Protestant. My father was an Irish Catholic. So, it was to the great dismay of some family members. But it was a reasonably happy family. My father was a printer and manual laborer his whole life. My mom was a secretary. We lived in a less wealthy area but I went to good public schools."Serving in World War II had left Henking's father disenchanted with Catholicism. So, she and her elder sister were raised under what she called the "social justice" Protestantism of her mother. It had polar effects on the siblings. While her sister became one of the earliest female Episcopalian Priests, it was as an undergraduate student at Duke University that Henking discovered "I actually and actively hated religion.""My sister and I used to joke that she took God and I took everything else," Henking said.Yet, she decided to major in Religious Studies."I was trying to understand why people are religious," she asserted. "I had emerged from a religious setting to be pretty hostile and fascinated by it. I got very interested in theoretical explanations for why people would believe what I thought was patently untrue. For some, religion is the source of dramatic happiness and social change. For others, it's horrifyingly oppressive and can really hurt people."Despite relishing the academic challenges her chosen course of study provided, Henking recalled having "an emotionally difficult time in college. My parents raised me to think I could do anything I wanted to which turned out not to be true. My father thought I was perfect. Most of the rest of the world does not think that about me or about anyone else."She was in the midst of both the seventies and "a hotbed of lesbian feminism"?also known as the Research Triangle of Duke, North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.The journal Feminary emerged from Chapel Hill."We want to encourage feminist and lesbian organizing in a region whose women suffer greatly in their lack of political power," it's publishers wrote. "We want to provide an audience for Southern lesbians who may not think of themselves as writers but who have important stories to tell?stories that will help to fill the silences that have obscured the truth about our lives and kept us isolated from each other. We want to know who we are. We want to change women's lives.""I can intellectualize anything," Henki...

Samantha M. Galbavi - Argus Press

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Age 25, of Perry, passed away Wednesday, June 7, 2017, at Sparrow Health System.Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Monday, June 12, 2017, at Watkins Brothers Funeral Home, Perry Chapel, with Pastor Bubba Cook officiating. Burial will follow in Roselawn Cemetery in Perry. Family will receive friends from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. Subscription Required An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety. You need an online service to view this article in its entirety. Choose an online service. Current print subscribers Need an account? Create one now.

Obituary: Richard K. Davis - Malibu Times

Monday, May 01, 2017

Big Red” lacrosse team. After graduating with a degree in anthropology, he joined the Army as a 2nd Lieutenant and shipped off to Korea. After returning, he went to work for Sperry Rand Univac in New York City, beginning a career in the computer industry. While there, he also married Jane Kiely on May 4, 1957. In 1958, they moved to Berkeley where he earned an MBA in Operations Research from UC Berkeley and they also had the first of their six children. Upon graduating, they moved to Hinsdale, Ill., where he worked for Touche Ross (now Deloitte & Touche). After two years, they returned to California so that he could go to work for North American Aviation. They took up residence in Malibu. In the early 1970s, he and his business partner acquired Performance Development Corporation. Over the next 40+ years, they would travel the U.S. and the world advising many of the Fortune 500 and various arms of the Federal government. Davis was a longtime board member and president of the LaCosta Homeowners Association, he was president of Malibu Coastal Vision and was an active alumnus backer of the New Mexico Military Institute. He was named the 2004 Citizen of the Year by The Malibu Times. More recently, he organized a concert in Malibu to raise funds for the homeless. In his spare time, he traveled the world, sometimes with his wife and sometimes to exotic surf spots with his kids and other surfing buddies. He was predeceased by his daughter, Sarah, and is survived by his wife of 59 years, five children, 11 grandchildren and one step-grandchild. The funeral mass was held on Saturday, April 1, at Our Lady of Malibu Church.