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Cornerstone Funeral Services and Cremation

18625 Southeast Bakers Ferry Road
Boring, OR 97009
(503) 637-5020
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Boring OR Obituaries and Death Notices

The last president of Shimer College - Windy City Times

Monday, June 19, 2017

Shortly before she retired one year later, Shimer made the decision to merge the all-girls seminary with the University of Chicago. She wanted what she called "a cause for which together we are laboring" to continue on in her beloved institution as the Frances Shimer Academy of the University of Chicago.It was a matter of long-term sustainability and, for the 116 years which followed its founder's death in 1901, Shimer Collegenot only survived but became economically, socially and culturally symbiotic with the turbulent history of the world around it.On May 20, 2017 Windy City Times received an announcement from Shimer alumnus and Board of Trustees member Robert Keohane which concluded the college's 164-year legacy with a cursory statement."Shimer as an independent college will cease to exist." "The Board of Trustees of North Central College formally voted to implement the Asset Purchase Agreement of last August which provides for Shimer College to become Shimer Great Books School of North Central College as of June 1, 2017," Keohane wrote. "This decision represents the culmination of a 20-month effort to find a way for the Shimer program to continue in a sustainable fashion."Keohane noted that 34 students would transfer to the Great Books School on North Central College's campus in Naperville, Illinois.While crediting Shimer's 14th President Dr. Susan E. Henking, Ph.D., who was hired in 2012, as playing a "crucial role in our success," Keohane stated that she would be "ending her affiliation with the College as of May 31."In his Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle wrote "if therefore, there is some end of our actions that we wish for on account of itself, the rest being things we wish for on account of this end, and if we do not choose all things on account of something else?for in this way the process will go on infinitely such that the longing involved is empty and pointless?clearly this would be the good, that is, the best."Henking spoke to Windy City Times by phone from a condo that had been rented by Shimer College. She said she was surr...

Satellite Beach police officers remembered after 1992 deadly crash - Florida Today

Saturday, June 10, 2017

And Chief (Lionel) Cote at the time knew that. And he knew that it wasn't safe to put us back on the road without grief counseling and debriefing," Pearson said."So all of the neighboring cities collectively got together, and they patrolled and they handled every single call and everything in all of Satellite Beach — for five straight days," he said."The sheriff's office, Indian Harbour Beach, Palm Bay all came in, took shifts and worked as if they were Satellite Beach police officers," he said. .oembed-asset-link { border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1; } .oembed-link-anchor { display: block; clear: both; } p.oembed-link-desc { font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px; font-family: 'Futura Today Light'; text-align: left; line-height: 120%; }Wednesday, the Satellite Beach Police Department conducted the 25th annual memorial service in remembrance of Hartmann and Flagg in the Atlantic Plaza parking lot.Roughly 200 people attended, including relatives, Satellite Beach officials, the Brevard County Sheriff's Office command  staff, and various Space Coast police chiefs.Show ThumbnailsShow CaptionsLast SlideNext SlideNear the podium, framed portraits of Hartmann, 37, and Flagg, 22, faced the crowd from a table adorned with a black tablecloth, a folded U.S. flag and a glass vase containing two white roses. During the service, Sally Flagg, Phil's mother, and Donna Davenport, Ed's sister, each took a rose and gently placed it next to the photo of their lost loved one.Behind the table across State Road A1A, workers labored at the construction site of the south Oceana Oceanfront Condominium. This property formerly housed the old Ramada Inn, where the fatal crash happened a quarter-century ago.  .oembed-asset-link { border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1; } .oembed-link-anchor { display: block; clear: both; } p.oembed-link-desc { font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px; font-family: 'Futura Today Light'; text-align: left; line-height: 120%; }Flagg pulled over a carload of juveniles from Christmas for drug and alcohol violations about 1:50 a.m., and Hartmann served as his backup, Pearson said. That's when Cocoa Beach re...

Million-dollar views remain at Flathead Lake in Montana - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, March 27, 2017

A warm impressionWhen I began searching online for affordable hotels for our family of three, I was stunned to find almost nothing for less than $200 a night. Not even chain motels in the larger neighboring city of Kalispell. Not even campgrounds, which were booked solid. Eventually, though, I pieced together an itinerary: an Airbnb here, a few midweek days at a midrange motel there, and one night at the home of a relative.For $112, our Airbnb in Big Arm was a surprisingly large, two-bedroom apartment with a wraparound deck, a narrow view of the lake and a washer and dryer — a bargain in this pricey terrain. But even with a well-equipped kitchen, we decided to eat out. Normally, we would save our splurge for the tail end of a trip, but after so many hours (and days) on the road, a steak dinner had become our finish line reward.In Polson (the nearest town), a local recommended 101 Main St., a steak and seafood restaurant that dry-ages its own beef. For the price of a mediocre plate of pasta in Manhattan, my husband, Tim, and I shared a large, tasty ribeye — praised by our waitress for its “flavorful fat” — and spoon-fed Roxie our mashed potatoes.But it was our server, Leslie, who was the highlight of the meal. She wore a pink head scarf over dark braids and doted on Roxie, bringing her a rattle and entertaining her as we ate. At the end of dinner, Leslie lifted Roxie into her arms and walked off with a casual, “Do you mind?” She knew we didn’t. It was the kind of thing that would never happen in most places. This unaffected warmth made as much of an impression on me as Montana’s dramatic vistas.Our motel, the Islander Inn, was one of the few I could find that came close to my $150 budget. From the outside, it looks like a classic midcentury motor lodge, but each room is named for an island — Bali, Zanzibar, Crete — and decorated in the spirit of that place. Our room, “Jamaica,” had deep blue-accent walls, white wicker furniture and evocative paintings of Caribbean palms. Just east of Bigfork in the enclave of Woods Bay, the Islander was across the street from the Raven, a turquoise-painted waterfront restaurant with a shaded patio and a dock where motorboaters tie up and go in for a drink.Though Flathead Lake Brewing Co. recently opened a huge new location in Bigfork, the original taproom, next door to the Islander, is the kind of local bar where customers greet one another by name and discuss livestock futures over a pint of craft beer.The next evening, our first night in Woods Bay, Tim was struck by what felt like a vicious case of food poisoning. Roxie and I went exploring by car on our own, eventually finding our way to the Echo Lake Cafe, an out-of-the-way roadside restaurant that has been serving local specialties like Flathead cherry cobbler and huckleberry ice cream since 1960.Our plan had been to go kayaking, but with Tim sick I wasn’t comfortable taking Roxie out on a tiny boat on such a large, unpredictable lake. It would have been largely a lost day. But that afternoon, while Tim and Roxie napped, my dad’s cousin, LouAnn, whom I...

Former Delaware Secretary of Labor Stafford reflects on the legacy of his father - Dover Post

Monday, March 13, 2017

Stafford was reassigned, again as a laborer. He ended up carrying a pair of two-gallon buckets of water for the next decade, helping to quench the thirsts of the 50 or 60 men laboring in the heat of an Arkansas summer.Laid off in 1950, Stafford worked as horse groomer and scrap iron dealer before returning to the railroad. There, his hard work and reputation led to jobs of increasing responsibility, culminating as a supervising foreman before his retirement in 1982.Along the way, Stafford married Beatrice Bragg. Their first home, four acres of land and a leaky house, was purchased for $175. Beatrice brought in additional income as a domestic worker, but continued her education while raising their children. She eventually earned a Master’s Degree in Elementary Education and worked as a teacher for more than 30 years.Stafford coped with the restrictions of being a black man in the Deep South over much of his lifetime. Even fun family outings were dampened by the ever-present Jim Crow, forcing him to use the back door of the local Dairy Queen because the staff would not serve a black man in the front of the store.“He’d be so dejected when he came back,” Harold recalled. “He was embarrassed but he’d always say there’s a brighter day ahead.”Stafford, however, didn’t become involved in the civil rights movement of the 60s.“I’m not saying he never felt bitter or that he wasn’t happy about the condition under which he and other blacks lived at the time,” Harold said. “His concern was to make the best of a bad situation.”Stafford always encouraged his children to better themselves through education.“It was always very strongly enforced in the family that education was the key to equal opportunity in America,” Harold said. “And we always were told you can’t expect to be given anything in this world, you have to go out and make it happen.”Harold said it was important that he write the book about his father.“First off, I wanted the Stafford family to know about him,” he said. “I learned a lot of things that they didn’t know, I felt an obligation to tell the story.“Also, I see my dad as an unsung, unseen hero,” Harold added. “I wanted to chronicle his life so that our family, our friends and our community and maybe the world would know what a great man he was, and what you could accomplish, even with a sixth-grade education.”Harold’s book is subtitled “An American Dream Fulfilled.”“My dad not only had this dream about his own life and what he wanted to accomplish, but he did it against some very big odds,” Harold said. “He wanted to make sure his family had a quality of life that was better than his had been.”And although some may think the nickname “Water boy” to be derogatory, his father never considered that, Harold said.“He wore that name proudly,” he said. “He was proud he had that job with the railroad, it was a way out of poverty.”Harold highly recommends others taking the time to sit down with their elders and learn from them.“After having written this book about my dad and his experiences, when I see older p...

Elmo "Dick" James Dixson - Shawnee News Star

Monday, March 06, 2017

Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017.Shawnee resident, Elmo “Dick” James Dixson, 90, died peacefully at his home on Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017.Dick was born Dec. 18, 1926, in Harjo, Oklahoma, to JC and Flora (Boring) Dixson. When he was a young boy, they moved to Calumet. He joined the United States Army and was honorably discharged in 1956. He worked at Tinker Air Force Base for 32 years and retired in 1988.Dick married Carolyn Snow in August of 1977. He would tell you that there wasn’t a marriage better than theirs. They loved to travel and spend time together. He enjoyed going to Lake Eufaula as well as South Padre Island where they had a condo and would spend the winter months.He was a loving husband, father, grandfather and friend who was greatly loved and will be dearly missed.He was preceded in death by his parents.He is survived by his wife of 39 years, Carolyn Dixson; children, Mike Dixson and wife Jodi, Steve Snow-Stone and husband Ronald; half-brother, David Dixson; grandchildren, Zane and Kade Dixson; a host of other family and friends.Visitation will be 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday and 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday at Resthaven Funeral Home.Services will be 2 p.m. Tuesday at Resthaven Funeral Home with Chaplain Darrell Whitten officiating...

Lucinda J. Borland, 75 - The Free Press Standard

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Lucinda J. Borland, 75, of Orange City, FL, and formerly of Dellroy, OH, passed away Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017, at home.Cindy was preceded in death by her late husband, Lester Borland; father, Delbert Boring Sr.; and mother, Dorothy Boring. “Cindy” was a loving mother to Jeffrey Starlin (Tanya), Michael Starlin (Yvonne) and Craig Starlin and a loving grandmother to Laiken Starlin, Stephanie Starlin, Jeffrey Starlin Jr. and Zachary Starlin. Cindy is also survived by a brother, Delbert Boring Jr.; and two sisters, Emilie Ayers and Kimberly Berry.Cindy spent several years in the banking industry where she enjoyed meeting and helping people daily. On her down time, she enjoyed family, friends and extensive traveling. She will be deeply missed, but never forgotten.Funeral services will be held February 4 at 1 p.m.  in Allmon-Dugger-Cotton Funeral Home in Carrollton. Interment will be in Westview Cemetery in Carrollton.Visitation will be held Friday, Feb. 3 from 6-8 p.m. in the funeral home.In lieu of flowers donations may be made to The Shriner’s Hospital for Children’s International Headquarters, 2900 Rocky Point Dr., Tampa FL 33607.

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The last president of Shimer College - Windy City Times

Monday, June 19, 2017

Shortly before she retired one year later, Shimer made the decision to merge the all-girls seminary with the University of Chicago. She wanted what she called "a cause for which together we are laboring" to continue on in her beloved institution as the Frances Shimer Academy of the University of Chicago.It was a matter of long-term sustainability and, for the 116 years which followed its founder's death in 1901, Shimer Collegenot only survived but became economically, socially and culturally symbiotic with the turbulent history of the world around it.On May 20, 2017 Windy City Times received an announcement from Shimer alumnus and Board of Trustees member Robert Keohane which concluded the college's 164-year legacy with a cursory statement."Shimer as an independent college will cease to exist." "The Board of Trustees of North Central College formally voted to implement the Asset Purchase Agreement of last August which provides for Shimer College to become Shimer Great Books School of North Central College as of June 1, 2017," Keohane wrote. "This decision represents the culmination of a 20-month effort to find a way for the Shimer program to continue in a sustainable fashion."Keohane noted that 34 students would transfer to the Great Books School on North Central College's campus in Naperville, Illinois.While crediting Shimer's 14th President Dr. Susan E. Henking, Ph.D., who was hired in 2012, as playing a "crucial role in our success," Keohane stated that she would be "ending her affiliation with the College as of May 31."In his Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle wrote "if therefore, there is some end of our actions that we wish for on account of itself, the rest being things we wish for on account of this end, and if we do not choose all things on account of something else?for in this way the process will go on infinitely such that the longing involved is empty and pointless?clearly this would be the good, that is, the best."Henking spoke to Windy City Times by phone from a condo that had been rented by Shimer College. She said she was surr...

Satellite Beach police officers remembered after 1992 deadly crash - Florida Today

Saturday, June 10, 2017

And Chief (Lionel) Cote at the time knew that. And he knew that it wasn't safe to put us back on the road without grief counseling and debriefing," Pearson said."So all of the neighboring cities collectively got together, and they patrolled and they handled every single call and everything in all of Satellite Beach — for five straight days," he said."The sheriff's office, Indian Harbour Beach, Palm Bay all came in, took shifts and worked as if they were Satellite Beach police officers," he said. .oembed-asset-link { border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1; } .oembed-link-anchor { display: block; clear: both; } p.oembed-link-desc { font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px; font-family: 'Futura Today Light'; text-align: left; line-height: 120%; }Wednesday, the Satellite Beach Police Department conducted the 25th annual memorial service in remembrance of Hartmann and Flagg in the Atlantic Plaza parking lot.Roughly 200 people attended, including relatives, Satellite Beach officials, the Brevard County Sheriff's Office command  staff, and various Space Coast police chiefs.Show ThumbnailsShow CaptionsLast SlideNext SlideNear the podium, framed portraits of Hartmann, 37, and Flagg, 22, faced the crowd from a table adorned with a black tablecloth, a folded U.S. flag and a glass vase containing two white roses. During the service, Sally Flagg, Phil's mother, and Donna Davenport, Ed's sister, each took a rose and gently placed it next to the photo of their lost loved one.Behind the table across State Road A1A, workers labored at the construction site of the south Oceana Oceanfront Condominium. This property formerly housed the old Ramada Inn, where the fatal crash happened a quarter-century ago.  .oembed-asset-link { border-bottom: 1px solid #e1e1e1; } .oembed-link-anchor { display: block; clear: both; } p.oembed-link-desc { font-size: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: normal; margin: 0 14px 14px 14px; font-family: 'Futura Today Light'; text-align: left; line-height: 120%; }Flagg pulled over a carload of juveniles from Christmas for drug and alcohol violations about 1:50 a.m., and Hartmann served as his backup, Pearson said. That's when Cocoa Beach re...

Million-dollar views remain at Flathead Lake in Montana - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Monday, March 27, 2017

A warm impressionWhen I began searching online for affordable hotels for our family of three, I was stunned to find almost nothing for less than $200 a night. Not even chain motels in the larger neighboring city of Kalispell. Not even campgrounds, which were booked solid. Eventually, though, I pieced together an itinerary: an Airbnb here, a few midweek days at a midrange motel there, and one night at the home of a relative.For $112, our Airbnb in Big Arm was a surprisingly large, two-bedroom apartment with a wraparound deck, a narrow view of the lake and a washer and dryer — a bargain in this pricey terrain. But even with a well-equipped kitchen, we decided to eat out. Normally, we would save our splurge for the tail end of a trip, but after so many hours (and days) on the road, a steak dinner had become our finish line reward.In Polson (the nearest town), a local recommended 101 Main St., a steak and seafood restaurant that dry-ages its own beef. For the price of a mediocre plate of pasta in Manhattan, my husband, Tim, and I shared a large, tasty ribeye — praised by our waitress for its “flavorful fat” — and spoon-fed Roxie our mashed potatoes.But it was our server, Leslie, who was the highlight of the meal. She wore a pink head scarf over dark braids and doted on Roxie, bringing her a rattle and entertaining her as we ate. At the end of dinner, Leslie lifted Roxie into her arms and walked off with a casual, “Do you mind?” She knew we didn’t. It was the kind of thing that would never happen in most places. This unaffected warmth made as much of an impression on me as Montana’s dramatic vistas.Our motel, the Islander Inn, was one of the few I could find that came close to my $150 budget. From the outside, it looks like a classic midcentury motor lodge, but each room is named for an island — Bali, Zanzibar, Crete — and decorated in the spirit of that place. Our room, “Jamaica,” had deep blue-accent walls, white wicker furniture and evocative paintings of Caribbean palms. Just east of Bigfork in the enclave of Woods Bay, the Islander was across the street from the Raven, a turquoise-painted waterfront restaurant with a shaded patio and a dock where motorboaters tie up and go in for a drink.Though Flathead Lake Brewing Co. recently opened a huge new location in Bigfork, the original taproom, next door to the Islander, is the kind of local bar where customers greet one another by name and discuss livestock futures over a pint of craft beer.The next evening, our first night in Woods Bay, Tim was struck by what felt like a vicious case of food poisoning. Roxie and I went exploring by car on our own, eventually finding our way to the Echo Lake Cafe, an out-of-the-way roadside restaurant that has been serving local specialties like Flathead cherry cobbler and huckleberry ice cream since 1960.Our plan had been to go kayaking, but with Tim sick I wasn’t comfortable taking Roxie out on a tiny boat on such a large, unpredictable lake. It would have been largely a lost day. But that afternoon, while Tim and Roxie napped, my dad’s cousin, LouAnn, whom I...

Former Delaware Secretary of Labor Stafford reflects on the legacy of his father - Dover Post

Monday, March 13, 2017

Stafford was reassigned, again as a laborer. He ended up carrying a pair of two-gallon buckets of water for the next decade, helping to quench the thirsts of the 50 or 60 men laboring in the heat of an Arkansas summer.Laid off in 1950, Stafford worked as horse groomer and scrap iron dealer before returning to the railroad. There, his hard work and reputation led to jobs of increasing responsibility, culminating as a supervising foreman before his retirement in 1982.Along the way, Stafford married Beatrice Bragg. Their first home, four acres of land and a leaky house, was purchased for $175. Beatrice brought in additional income as a domestic worker, but continued her education while raising their children. She eventually earned a Master’s Degree in Elementary Education and worked as a teacher for more than 30 years.Stafford coped with the restrictions of being a black man in the Deep South over much of his lifetime. Even fun family outings were dampened by the ever-present Jim Crow, forcing him to use the back door of the local Dairy Queen because the staff would not serve a black man in the front of the store.“He’d be so dejected when he came back,” Harold recalled. “He was embarrassed but he’d always say there’s a brighter day ahead.”Stafford, however, didn’t become involved in the civil rights movement of the 60s.“I’m not saying he never felt bitter or that he wasn’t happy about the condition under which he and other blacks lived at the time,” Harold said. “His concern was to make the best of a bad situation.”Stafford always encouraged his children to better themselves through education.“It was always very strongly enforced in the family that education was the key to equal opportunity in America,” Harold said. “And we always were told you can’t expect to be given anything in this world, you have to go out and make it happen.”Harold said it was important that he write the book about his father.“First off, I wanted the Stafford family to know about him,” he said. “I learned a lot of things that they didn’t know, I felt an obligation to tell the story.“Also, I see my dad as an unsung, unseen hero,” Harold added. “I wanted to chronicle his life so that our family, our friends and our community and maybe the world would know what a great man he was, and what you could accomplish, even with a sixth-grade education.”Harold’s book is subtitled “An American Dream Fulfilled.”“My dad not only had this dream about his own life and what he wanted to accomplish, but he did it against some very big odds,” Harold said. “He wanted to make sure his family had a quality of life that was better than his had been.”And although some may think the nickname “Water boy” to be derogatory, his father never considered that, Harold said.“He wore that name proudly,” he said. “He was proud he had that job with the railroad, it was a way out of poverty.”Harold highly recommends others taking the time to sit down with their elders and learn from them.“After having written this book about my dad and his experiences, when I see older p...

Elmo "Dick" James Dixson - Shawnee News Star

Monday, March 06, 2017

Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017.Shawnee resident, Elmo “Dick” James Dixson, 90, died peacefully at his home on Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017.Dick was born Dec. 18, 1926, in Harjo, Oklahoma, to JC and Flora (Boring) Dixson. When he was a young boy, they moved to Calumet. He joined the United States Army and was honorably discharged in 1956. He worked at Tinker Air Force Base for 32 years and retired in 1988.Dick married Carolyn Snow in August of 1977. He would tell you that there wasn’t a marriage better than theirs. They loved to travel and spend time together. He enjoyed going to Lake Eufaula as well as South Padre Island where they had a condo and would spend the winter months.He was a loving husband, father, grandfather and friend who was greatly loved and will be dearly missed.He was preceded in death by his parents.He is survived by his wife of 39 years, Carolyn Dixson; children, Mike Dixson and wife Jodi, Steve Snow-Stone and husband Ronald; half-brother, David Dixson; grandchildren, Zane and Kade Dixson; a host of other family and friends.Visitation will be 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday and 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday at Resthaven Funeral Home.Services will be 2 p.m. Tuesday at Resthaven Funeral Home with Chaplain Darrell Whitten officiating...

Lucinda J. Borland, 75 - The Free Press Standard

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Lucinda J. Borland, 75, of Orange City, FL, and formerly of Dellroy, OH, passed away Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017, at home.Cindy was preceded in death by her late husband, Lester Borland; father, Delbert Boring Sr.; and mother, Dorothy Boring. “Cindy” was a loving mother to Jeffrey Starlin (Tanya), Michael Starlin (Yvonne) and Craig Starlin and a loving grandmother to Laiken Starlin, Stephanie Starlin, Jeffrey Starlin Jr. and Zachary Starlin. Cindy is also survived by a brother, Delbert Boring Jr.; and two sisters, Emilie Ayers and Kimberly Berry.Cindy spent several years in the banking industry where she enjoyed meeting and helping people daily. On her down time, she enjoyed family, friends and extensive traveling. She will be deeply missed, but never forgotten.Funeral services will be held February 4 at 1 p.m.  in Allmon-Dugger-Cotton Funeral Home in Carrollton. Interment will be in Westview Cemetery in Carrollton.Visitation will be held Friday, Feb. 3 from 6-8 p.m. in the funeral home.In lieu of flowers donations may be made to The Shriner’s Hospital for Children’s International Headquarters, 2900 Rocky Point Dr., Tampa FL 33607.