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Sweeney Mortuary

216 South Main Street
Condon, OR 97823
(541) 384-2001
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Condon OR Obituaries and Death Notices

Deaths Summary for Sunday, January 1, 2017 - Charleston Post Courier

Monday, January 30, 2017

Stuhr's Mount Pleasant Chapel.GIBBONS, Joyce Elizabeth Player, 82, of Isle of Palms, widow of William C. Gibbons Jr., died Saturday. Arrangements by Stephens Funeral Home of Manning.REGISTER, Mary Condon Montgomery, 96, of Charleston, a secretary with St. Philip's Episcopal Church, first married to the late Edward R. Montgomery and widow of Robert E. Register, died Saturday. Arrangements by James A. McAlister Funerals and Cremation.SPURLOCK, Jean Baldwin, 90, of Mount Pleasant, widow of Clifton O. Spurlock, died Monday. Arrangements by Stuhr's Mount Pleasant Chapel.WHALEY, Kurt, 51, of North Charleston died Friday. Arrangements by Suburban Funeral Home.Berkeley CountyHALTIWANGER, Lynn Howard, 74, of Hanahan, a retired hotel salesperson marketer and wife of Harold W. Haltiwanger, died Friday. Arrangements by Russell Funeral Chapel of Moncks Corner.WILLIAMS, J. M. Joe, 88, of Hanahan, an Air Force retiree and widower of Betty K. Williams, died Thursday. Arrangements by J. F. Floyd's Greenlawn Chapel of Spartanburg.Dorchester CountyGUNTER, R. Rocky Allen, 65, of Summerville died Friday. Arrangements by James A. Dyal Funeral Home.HARDAWAY, Velma, 94, of Summerville died Friday. Arrangements by The Serenity Mortuary.WILLIAMS, Clara, 67, of Summerville died Friday. Arrangements by Dickerson Mortuary of North Charleston.ElsewhereALTMAN, Willa Dean Browder, 86, of Johnsonville, a retired teacher's aide with Horry County School District and widow of O. D. Altman Jr., died Saturday. Arrangements by Morris Funeral Home...

Best of the rest: Events for Jan. 9 and beyond - The State

Monday, January 09, 2017

Assembly St. (803) 799-9084, www.richlandlibrary.com/evanced-registration/51133TUESDAY, JAN. 10MICHAEL CASSIDY: AS THEY ARE & DIANE KILGORE CONDON: FILM OF THE MIND: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday at if ART Gallery. The gallery will open two solo exhibitions. Cassidy, of West Columbia, S.C., will present a new body of small paintings of plants, shells, deer antlers and pieces of brick. Kilgore Condon, of Greenville, S.C., will present a new body of large and small works featuring animals and vegetation. 1223 Lincoln St. (803) 238-2351, wroefs@sc.rr.com. http://ifartgallery.blogspot.com/GENEALOGY: RESEARCH YOUR FAMILY HISTORY: 2-3 p.m. Tuesday at Lexington Main. Learn how to research your family history by using tools available through the library like Ancestry and HeritageQuest. 5440 Augusta Rd. Lexington. (803) 785-2680, www.lex.lib.sc.us/calendar.asp#/?i=2COFFEE AND CONVERSATION: 2-4 p.m. Tuesday at Cayce United Methodist Church. Singles age 55+ who find themselves alone, and who would enjoy good conversation with other folks over a cup of coffee, this is for you! It will be an enjoyable time. While Cayce UMC has generously donated the meeting space, this program is not affiliated with the church. Sponsored by Thompson Funeral Home. 1600 12th St., Cayce. Mary Beth Lamey, (803) 996-1023, (803) 995-0068. www.thompsonsfuneral.comEDVENTURE’S FAMILY NIGHT: 5-8 p.m. Tuesday at EdVenture Children’s Museum. Bringing the whole family out for a fun (and affordable!) excursion is easier thanks to this family-friendly event. Admission at just $1 per person. 211 Gervais St. (803) 799-3100, marketing@edventure.org. www.edventure.org/plan-your-visit/family-visits/COLUMBIA CANAL HISTORY TOUR: 6-7 p.m. Tuesday at the Red Schoolhouse at Riverfront Park South area parking lot. The Columbia Canal has been part of our city’s growth and innovation for almost 200 years. Learn about the original 1820s canal, the present 1890s canal and the historic buildings that surround us. 312 Laurel St. (803) 545-3100PICKLEBALL: 6-8:30 p.m. Tuesday at Trenholm Park, indoors. Pickleball is the fastest growing sport in the country although it is 50 years old. It is a fusion of tennis, badminton and ping pong. Equipment provided. Round-robin style of play each week. Good for all ages, but mostly those 18 to 99 play at this weekly event. Free play and free of charge. 3900 Covenant Rd. (803) 787-0216, richlandcountyrecreation.com/centers/trenholm-park/SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING: 7 p.m. Tuesday at Eastminster Presbyterian Church. Good exercise and fun. Classes are free. 3200 Trenholm Rd. Bill McCullough, instructor, Palmetto Scottish Country Dance Society, (803) 345-0158, billmac85@yahoo.comWEDNESDAY, JAN. 11FAME AND FASHION: THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF JOHN ENGSTEAD: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday at the Columbia Museum of Art. In the spirit of Old Hollywood, the Columbia Museum of Art presents an exhibition featuring the movie star portraiture of photographer John Engstead in all its vintage glitz and glamour. Engstead began his career in 1926 when he was hired as an office boy for Paramoun...

Barger, Margaret Gladys Johnson - The Chattanoogan

Monday, November 07, 2016

January 21, 1927 to the late Noel Norman and Ollie Womack Johnson.  Also preceding her in death were her husband, Ralph C. Barger, sister, Ida Mae Colbaugh, brothers, Norman “Son” Johnson, Condon Johnson and Emmett Johnson.Margaret and Ralph were married 60 years prior to his passing in January of 2006.  She was a loving and devoted wife and helper to Ralph, who was a former mayor of Red Bank and a Hamilton County commissioner.Margaret was a graduate of Spring City High School and was retired from DuPont in Chattanooga.  She was a faithful member of Red Bank Baptist Church.Survivors include her brother, Willard (Jo Ann) Johnson and several nieces and nephews.Funeral services will be held on Sunday, Nov. 6, at 2 p.m. in the funeral home chapel with Reverend Bill Harvey officiating.  Burial will follow at the Rhea County Memory Gardens, Dayton, Tn.The family will receive friends on Sunday, Nov. 6, from 12-2 p.m. in the funeral home.Arrangements entrusted to Lane Funeral Home on Ashland Terrance, 601 Ashland Terrace, Chattanooga, Tn. 37415, 423 877-3524, www.lanefh.com.

Donn Fendler, Who Was Lost in Wilds of Maine as a Boy, Dies at 90 - New York Times

Monday, October 24, 2016

On July 17, Donald Fendler and his sons, Ryan, Donn and Tommy, Donn’s twin, headed out after lunch to ascend Mount Katahdin, at 5,267 feet the state’s highest peak. They were accompanied by Henry Condon, the 17-year-old son of a local guide, and Fred Eaton, a young family friend.Eager to climb, Donn left his father and brothers behind, pushing on with Henry and Fred, when bad weather set in. “Just as we reached the summit, the mist closed in around us and shut off our view of the mountain below,” he said in “Lost on a Mountain in Maine” (1939), an as-told-to account of his adventure written with Joseph B. Egan.Ignoring the advice of his climbing mates, Donn headed back to rejoin his family. Lashed by rain and disoriented by the enveloping mist, he quickly became lost. And thus began his weeklong odyssey.Recalling his Boy Scout training, he decided to follow a small stream toward what he hoped would be a camp or town. At night, he curled up between tree roots and covered himself with moss. He ate wild berries. On the second day, tripping as he walked in the stream, he lost his sneakers, which he had tied together and carried over his shoulder.Not long after, trying to throw his soaked jeans onto a rock in the stream, he misjudged and watched as the water carried them away. “I couldn’t believe it,” he recalled in his book. “My pants were gone. There I was like a Kewpie or something.”Small stones cut his feet. Near-freezing temperatures at night stiffened his limbs. Mosquitoes, black flies and moose flies bit.“Somebody ought to do something about those black flies,” Mr. Fendler said in “Lost on a Mountain in Maine.” “They’re terrible — around your forehead, under your hair, in your eyebrows and in the corners of your eyes and in the corners of your mouth, and they get up your nose like dust and make you sneeze, and you keep digging them out of your ears.”He prayed. He hallucinated. One day, he heard a plane circling overhead but could not find a clearing to wave at it. Twice he encountered bears, foraging, as he was, for berries. He began to lose strength and hope, before the sight of telephone wires suggested to him that he was on the right track.On July 25, he came to a clearing and saw, across a lake, two canoes and a small cabin, part of a remote camp on the east branch of the Penobscot River run by Nelson McMoarn. Mr. McMoarn emerged from the cabin and did a double take.“I crawled out on the big log so the man could see me, and began to yell,” Mr. Fendler said in his book. “I guess that yelling was pretty funny, for Mr. McMoarn told me later it sounded like a screech owl.”After being carried to bed by Lena McMoarn, Nelson’s wife, and revived with coffee and soup, Donn was handed a telephone receiver. His mother was on the other end of the line. “Mama, I’m all right,” he told her. Scratched, swollen and eaten alive by insects, 16 pounds ...

Counselors, lifeguards review updated regulations at Curley center ... - The Boston Globe

Monday, August 01, 2016

While the center was closed, parents dropped their children off at the nearby Condon Community Center day camp. Walsh said he was confident the Curley center would reopen Tuesday, but a spokeswoman for the Centers for Youth & Families said it may fully reopen later this week.“It all depends on how the young people feel and how the training goes,” Sandy Holden said, referring to the younger staff.Police Commissioner William B. Evans said he hopes the city’s new measures help make programs safer.“Everything indicates a terrible tragedy,” he said. “You let a little kid like that, 7 years old, out of your sight for seconds and something like this happens.”The new regulations will be adopted at the city’s five drop-in programs.“It’s just sad,” Walsh said. “Sometimes, it takes a horrific event to bring change.”A wake will be held for Kyzr Wednesday at Morning Star Baptist Church in Mattapan. Funeral services will be held Thursday.Miguel Otárola can be reached at miguel.otarola@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @motarola123.

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Deaths Summary for Sunday, January 1, 2017 - Charleston Post Courier

Monday, January 30, 2017

Stuhr's Mount Pleasant Chapel.GIBBONS, Joyce Elizabeth Player, 82, of Isle of Palms, widow of William C. Gibbons Jr., died Saturday. Arrangements by Stephens Funeral Home of Manning.REGISTER, Mary Condon Montgomery, 96, of Charleston, a secretary with St. Philip's Episcopal Church, first married to the late Edward R. Montgomery and widow of Robert E. Register, died Saturday. Arrangements by James A. McAlister Funerals and Cremation.SPURLOCK, Jean Baldwin, 90, of Mount Pleasant, widow of Clifton O. Spurlock, died Monday. Arrangements by Stuhr's Mount Pleasant Chapel.WHALEY, Kurt, 51, of North Charleston died Friday. Arrangements by Suburban Funeral Home.Berkeley CountyHALTIWANGER, Lynn Howard, 74, of Hanahan, a retired hotel salesperson marketer and wife of Harold W. Haltiwanger, died Friday. Arrangements by Russell Funeral Chapel of Moncks Corner.WILLIAMS, J. M. Joe, 88, of Hanahan, an Air Force retiree and widower of Betty K. Williams, died Thursday. Arrangements by J. F. Floyd's Greenlawn Chapel of Spartanburg.Dorchester CountyGUNTER, R. Rocky Allen, 65, of Summerville died Friday. Arrangements by James A. Dyal Funeral Home.HARDAWAY, Velma, 94, of Summerville died Friday. Arrangements by The Serenity Mortuary.WILLIAMS, Clara, 67, of Summerville died Friday. Arrangements by Dickerson Mortuary of North Charleston.ElsewhereALTMAN, Willa Dean Browder, 86, of Johnsonville, a retired teacher's aide with Horry County School District and widow of O. D. Altman Jr., died Saturday. Arrangements by Morris Funeral Home...

Best of the rest: Events for Jan. 9 and beyond - The State

Monday, January 09, 2017

Assembly St. (803) 799-9084, www.richlandlibrary.com/evanced-registration/51133TUESDAY, JAN. 10MICHAEL CASSIDY: AS THEY ARE & DIANE KILGORE CONDON: FILM OF THE MIND: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday at if ART Gallery. The gallery will open two solo exhibitions. Cassidy, of West Columbia, S.C., will present a new body of small paintings of plants, shells, deer antlers and pieces of brick. Kilgore Condon, of Greenville, S.C., will present a new body of large and small works featuring animals and vegetation. 1223 Lincoln St. (803) 238-2351, wroefs@sc.rr.com. http://ifartgallery.blogspot.com/GENEALOGY: RESEARCH YOUR FAMILY HISTORY: 2-3 p.m. Tuesday at Lexington Main. Learn how to research your family history by using tools available through the library like Ancestry and HeritageQuest. 5440 Augusta Rd. Lexington. (803) 785-2680, www.lex.lib.sc.us/calendar.asp#/?i=2COFFEE AND CONVERSATION: 2-4 p.m. Tuesday at Cayce United Methodist Church. Singles age 55+ who find themselves alone, and who would enjoy good conversation with other folks over a cup of coffee, this is for you! It will be an enjoyable time. While Cayce UMC has generously donated the meeting space, this program is not affiliated with the church. Sponsored by Thompson Funeral Home. 1600 12th St., Cayce. Mary Beth Lamey, (803) 996-1023, (803) 995-0068. www.thompsonsfuneral.comEDVENTURE’S FAMILY NIGHT: 5-8 p.m. Tuesday at EdVenture Children’s Museum. Bringing the whole family out for a fun (and affordable!) excursion is easier thanks to this family-friendly event. Admission at just $1 per person. 211 Gervais St. (803) 799-3100, marketing@edventure.org. www.edventure.org/plan-your-visit/family-visits/COLUMBIA CANAL HISTORY TOUR: 6-7 p.m. Tuesday at the Red Schoolhouse at Riverfront Park South area parking lot. The Columbia Canal has been part of our city’s growth and innovation for almost 200 years. Learn about the original 1820s canal, the present 1890s canal and the historic buildings that surround us. 312 Laurel St. (803) 545-3100PICKLEBALL: 6-8:30 p.m. Tuesday at Trenholm Park, indoors. Pickleball is the fastest growing sport in the country although it is 50 years old. It is a fusion of tennis, badminton and ping pong. Equipment provided. Round-robin style of play each week. Good for all ages, but mostly those 18 to 99 play at this weekly event. Free play and free of charge. 3900 Covenant Rd. (803) 787-0216, richlandcountyrecreation.com/centers/trenholm-park/SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING: 7 p.m. Tuesday at Eastminster Presbyterian Church. Good exercise and fun. Classes are free. 3200 Trenholm Rd. Bill McCullough, instructor, Palmetto Scottish Country Dance Society, (803) 345-0158, billmac85@yahoo.comWEDNESDAY, JAN. 11FAME AND FASHION: THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF JOHN ENGSTEAD: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday at the Columbia Museum of Art. In the spirit of Old Hollywood, the Columbia Museum of Art presents an exhibition featuring the movie star portraiture of photographer John Engstead in all its vintage glitz and glamour. Engstead began his career in 1926 when he was hired as an office boy for Paramoun...

Barger, Margaret Gladys Johnson - The Chattanoogan

Monday, November 07, 2016

January 21, 1927 to the late Noel Norman and Ollie Womack Johnson.  Also preceding her in death were her husband, Ralph C. Barger, sister, Ida Mae Colbaugh, brothers, Norman “Son” Johnson, Condon Johnson and Emmett Johnson.Margaret and Ralph were married 60 years prior to his passing in January of 2006.  She was a loving and devoted wife and helper to Ralph, who was a former mayor of Red Bank and a Hamilton County commissioner.Margaret was a graduate of Spring City High School and was retired from DuPont in Chattanooga.  She was a faithful member of Red Bank Baptist Church.Survivors include her brother, Willard (Jo Ann) Johnson and several nieces and nephews.Funeral services will be held on Sunday, Nov. 6, at 2 p.m. in the funeral home chapel with Reverend Bill Harvey officiating.  Burial will follow at the Rhea County Memory Gardens, Dayton, Tn.The family will receive friends on Sunday, Nov. 6, from 12-2 p.m. in the funeral home.Arrangements entrusted to Lane Funeral Home on Ashland Terrance, 601 Ashland Terrace, Chattanooga, Tn. 37415, 423 877-3524, www.lanefh.com.

Donn Fendler, Who Was Lost in Wilds of Maine as a Boy, Dies at 90 - New York Times

Monday, October 24, 2016

On July 17, Donald Fendler and his sons, Ryan, Donn and Tommy, Donn’s twin, headed out after lunch to ascend Mount Katahdin, at 5,267 feet the state’s highest peak. They were accompanied by Henry Condon, the 17-year-old son of a local guide, and Fred Eaton, a young family friend.Eager to climb, Donn left his father and brothers behind, pushing on with Henry and Fred, when bad weather set in. “Just as we reached the summit, the mist closed in around us and shut off our view of the mountain below,” he said in “Lost on a Mountain in Maine” (1939), an as-told-to account of his adventure written with Joseph B. Egan.Ignoring the advice of his climbing mates, Donn headed back to rejoin his family. Lashed by rain and disoriented by the enveloping mist, he quickly became lost. And thus began his weeklong odyssey.Recalling his Boy Scout training, he decided to follow a small stream toward what he hoped would be a camp or town. At night, he curled up between tree roots and covered himself with moss. He ate wild berries. On the second day, tripping as he walked in the stream, he lost his sneakers, which he had tied together and carried over his shoulder.Not long after, trying to throw his soaked jeans onto a rock in the stream, he misjudged and watched as the water carried them away. “I couldn’t believe it,” he recalled in his book. “My pants were gone. There I was like a Kewpie or something.”Small stones cut his feet. Near-freezing temperatures at night stiffened his limbs. Mosquitoes, black flies and moose flies bit.“Somebody ought to do something about those black flies,” Mr. Fendler said in “Lost on a Mountain in Maine.” “They’re terrible — around your forehead, under your hair, in your eyebrows and in the corners of your eyes and in the corners of your mouth, and they get up your nose like dust and make you sneeze, and you keep digging them out of your ears.”He prayed. He hallucinated. One day, he heard a plane circling overhead but could not find a clearing to wave at it. Twice he encountered bears, foraging, as he was, for berries. He began to lose strength and hope, before the sight of telephone wires suggested to him that he was on the right track.On July 25, he came to a clearing and saw, across a lake, two canoes and a small cabin, part of a remote camp on the east branch of the Penobscot River run by Nelson McMoarn. Mr. McMoarn emerged from the cabin and did a double take.“I crawled out on the big log so the man could see me, and began to yell,” Mr. Fendler said in his book. “I guess that yelling was pretty funny, for Mr. McMoarn told me later it sounded like a screech owl.”After being carried to bed by Lena McMoarn, Nelson’s wife, and revived with coffee and soup, Donn was handed a telephone receiver. His mother was on the other end of the line. “Mama, I’m all right,” he told her. Scratched, swollen and eaten alive by insects, 16 pounds ...

Counselors, lifeguards review updated regulations at Curley center ... - The Boston Globe

Monday, August 01, 2016

While the center was closed, parents dropped their children off at the nearby Condon Community Center day camp. Walsh said he was confident the Curley center would reopen Tuesday, but a spokeswoman for the Centers for Youth & Families said it may fully reopen later this week.“It all depends on how the young people feel and how the training goes,” Sandy Holden said, referring to the younger staff.Police Commissioner William B. Evans said he hopes the city’s new measures help make programs safer.“Everything indicates a terrible tragedy,” he said. “You let a little kid like that, 7 years old, out of your sight for seconds and something like this happens.”The new regulations will be adopted at the city’s five drop-in programs.“It’s just sad,” Walsh said. “Sometimes, it takes a horrific event to bring change.”A wake will be held for Kyzr Wednesday at Morning Star Baptist Church in Mattapan. Funeral services will be held Thursday.Miguel Otárola can be reached at miguel.otarola@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @motarola123.