Forest Grove OR Funeral Homes

Forest Grove OR funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Fuiten Rose and Hoyt Funeral Home Forest Grove , Mountain View Memorial Garden by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Forest Grove funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

funeral flowers

Funeral Flowers

Express your deepest sympathies - send beautiful flowers today!

sympathy roses

Sympathy Roses

Give comfort and loving support — order a delivery today!

funeral standing sprays
$20 OFF

Standing Sprays

Heart-felt tributes to honor a dear friend or loved one who has passed away

Forest Grove Memorial Chapel

1920 Pacific Avenue
Forest Grove, OR 97116
(503) 357-3126
Forest Grove Memorial Chapel funeral flowers

Forest View Cemetery

1156 Southwest Pacific Avenue
Forest Grove, OR 97116
(503) 357-6611
Forest View Cemetery funeral flowers

Fuiten Rose and Hoyt Funeral Home Forest Grove

2308 Pacific Avenue
Forest Grove, OR 97116
(503) 357-2161
Fuiten Rose and Hoyt Funeral Home Forest Grove funeral flowers

Mountain View Memorial Garden

Po Box 334
Forest Grove, OR e, OR
(503) 357-9303
Mountain View Memorial Garden funeral flowers

Westside Cremation and Burial Service

9456 Northwest Roy Road
Forest Grove, OR 97116
(503) 640-9045
Westside Cremation and Burial Service funeral flowers

Forest Grove OR Obituaries and Death Notices

Slave in Oregon sued owner for return of kids - Coeur d'Alene Press

Monday, August 29, 2016

Mr. Dickinson was a hard worker and acquired a fortune in the seed and nursery business. He gave liberally of his means to other churches, not long since donating quite a sum to Pacific academy at Forest Grove. He was a man of social qualities and charitable in his instincts.”Chief Justice George Williams made the right decision in the Holmes v. Ford case, but he was no champion of African-American civil rights. In his so-called “Free State Letter” published in the Oregon Statesman in 1857 at a time when there was a growing number of Democrats in Oregon favoring slavery, William opposed the idea — but not for reasons acceptable today:He said slavery was not adaptable to Oregon’s economy and would be disastrous. He said “Negroes are naturally lazy” and “ignorant,” and the cost of bringing them to Oregon would be prohibitively expensive and would harm the existing labor force.An Oregon Secretary of State article says, “Only a handful of Oregon’s farmers could afford the cost of buying, transporting and providing for slaves. Moreover, the territory’s crops and economy generally were not suited for slavery or a plantation system such as was used with cotton in the South.”The article further noted that slaves would have to be supported during winter time when they would be out of work. “What could a Negro fitted by nature for the blazing sun of Africa, do in an Oregon winter?”Justice Williams further declared that southern slaveholders would only sell their most troublesome slaves, raising the question “Would these slaves, once in Oregon, escape to the free state of California or the free territory of Washington? Or worse yet, would they flee to the refuge of hostile Indians, perhaps forming an alliance to attack isolated and poorly protected white settlements in Oregon?”Nathaniel Ford did not go down in history as a monster — his notoriety was bringing slaves to Oregon and being embroiled in an historical lawsuit.Before coming to Oregon he was a surveyor, schoolteacher, flat-boatman and sheriff. He and his wife Lucinda had two sons and eight daughters — four of the children dying before the family moved west.Ford treated the Holmes family well, building them their own cabin and letting them sell produce they grew on his land.For the rest of his life, Ford worked mostly as a surveyor, but also served as one of Oregon’s early legislators. The Provisional Legislature asked him to be the Supreme Judge of Oregon but he declined. Years later he was elected as a Democrat member of the Territorial Legislature representing Polk and Tillamook Counties — and later other counties. He ended his political career in the state Senate after Oregon became a state.Oregon researcher Arlie Holt wrote, “I think he is one of the most important men in Polk County history.”Nathaniel Ford died in Rickreall (new spelling) in Polk County in 1870 at the age of 75. (Rickreall was called “Dixie” during the Civil War because of the many southern sympathizers living there.)Once freed, Robin and Polly Holmes moved to Marion Coun...

Funeral Home Flowers

Forest Grove News

Slave in Oregon sued owner for return of kids - Coeur d'Alene Press

Monday, August 29, 2016

Mr. Dickinson was a hard worker and acquired a fortune in the seed and nursery business. He gave liberally of his means to other churches, not long since donating quite a sum to Pacific academy at Forest Grove. He was a man of social qualities and charitable in his instincts.”Chief Justice George Williams made the right decision in the Holmes v. Ford case, but he was no champion of African-American civil rights. In his so-called “Free State Letter” published in the Oregon Statesman in 1857 at a time when there was a growing number of Democrats in Oregon favoring slavery, William opposed the idea — but not for reasons acceptable today:He said slavery was not adaptable to Oregon’s economy and would be disastrous. He said “Negroes are naturally lazy” and “ignorant,” and the cost of bringing them to Oregon would be prohibitively expensive and would harm the existing labor force.An Oregon Secretary of State article says, “Only a handful of Oregon’s farmers could afford the cost of buying, transporting and providing for slaves. Moreover, the territory’s crops and economy generally were not suited for slavery or a plantation system such as was used with cotton in the South.”The article further noted that slaves would have to be supported during winter time when they would be out of work. “What could a Negro fitted by nature for the blazing sun of Africa, do in an Oregon winter?”Justice Williams further declared that southern slaveholders would only sell their most troublesome slaves, raising the question “Would these slaves, once in Oregon, escape to the free state of California or the free territory of Washington? Or worse yet, would they flee to the refuge of hostile Indians, perhaps forming an alliance to attack isolated and poorly protected white settlements in Oregon?”Nathaniel Ford did not go down in history as a monster — his notoriety was bringing slaves to Oregon and being embroiled in an historical lawsuit.Before coming to Oregon he was a surveyor, schoolteacher, flat-boatman and sheriff. He and his wife Lucinda had two sons and eight daughters — four of the children dying before the family moved west.Ford treated the Holmes family well, building them their own cabin and letting them sell produce they grew on his land.For the rest of his life, Ford worked mostly as a surveyor, but also served as one of Oregon’s early legislators. The Provisional Legislature asked him to be the Supreme Judge of Oregon but he declined. Years later he was elected as a Democrat member of the Territorial Legislature representing Polk and Tillamook Counties — and later other counties. He ended his political career in the state Senate after Oregon became a state.Oregon researcher Arlie Holt wrote, “I think he is one of the most important men in Polk County history.”Nathaniel Ford died in Rickreall (new spelling) in Polk County in 1870 at the age of 75. (Rickreall was called “Dixie” during the Civil War because of the many southern sympathizers living there.)Once freed, Robin and Polly Holmes moved to Marion Coun...