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Halfway, OR 97834
(541) 742-6435
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Man who killed three in Fort Worth is first execution of 2017 - Fort Worth Star Telegram

Monday, January 23, 2017

Tarrant County taxpayers,” Sheard said Wednesday.‘I don’t care’ Wilkins arrived in Fort Worth in 2005 after stealing a pickup truck in Houston, where he was living in a halfway house. He had been released from a federal prison in California earlier that year.Christopher Chubasco Wilkins, 48, was the first person executed this year in the United States and the first of four men from Tarrant County scheduled to be put to death in Texas in 2017.Wilkins told jurors he killed Freeman because Freeman ripped him off in a drug deal and laughed at him. Freeman’s friend, Silva, was killed because he was in the wrong place at the wrong time.Prosecutors presented evidence that Wilkins decided to kill Freeman after Freeman tricked Wilkins into paying $20 for a piece of gravel that Freeman passed off as crack cocaine, court documents stated. Wilkins told Freeman he had a stash of drugs and guns across town and Silva agreed to drive them there. Wilkins shot Freeman in the back of the head during the trip on Oct. 28, 2005, and shot Silva three times as he tried to escape, according to appeals court documents. Vallejo was killed because he made Wilkins mad.Wilkins also said he nearly killed two more people — about a week after killing Freeman and Silva — when he ran them down on a sidewalk in a stolen car.During his trial, he made no excuses.“You can consider drugs if you want to,” Wilkins told jurors in 2008. “But I wouldn’t put too much weight on that. When I get wound up, I have a fuse that is short. I don’t think about what I am doing. I don’t care.”Texas adopted lethal injection as means of execution in 1977 and executed its first offender — Charlie Brooks of Tarrant County — by lethal injection Dec. 7, 1982.He was covered with tattoos, including images of demons, swastikas, even a portrait of Adolf Hitler, but told jurors they were mostly “just hype” and used as protection in prison.“Look, butterflies and flowers don’t work,” he said.When asked if he wanted to die, Wilkins thought for a second, then replied that he had nothing to live for.“I haven’t been any good to anybody for the last 20 years and I won’t be for the next 20 or the 20 after that,” Wilkins said.Wilkins’ testimony should be viewed as something that came from a person with brain damage, Sheard said. Psychological experts indicated that Wilkins had multiple head injuries and was exposed to LSD as a child, but that information was never provided to a jury, Sheard said.“Now, because he will be dead soon, we will never know,” she said.Wes Ball, one of Wilkins’ trial lawyers, described him as “candid to a degree you don’t see,” and had hoped his appearance on the witness stand would have made jurors like him, the AP reported. “It didn’t work,” Ball told the AP. “This guy is the classic outlaw in the model of Billy the Kid, an Old West-style outlaw,” Kevin Rousseau, the Tarrant County assistant district attorney who prosecuted Wilkins, told the AP. Downward trend Twenty convicted killers were executed in the U.S. last year, the lowest number since the early 1980s, according ...

North Dakota's longest-serving state's attorney currently in office retires - The Dickinson Press

Monday, January 09, 2017

Hillsboro offers an excellent education through its schools, with the community accepting his family as one of their own.He also noted the location of Hillsboro, which sits halfway between Grand Forks and Fargo."One of the neat things is we are 45 minutes from either way, from two great communities: Grand Forks and Fargo," he said. "There are a lot of communities in this country that can't be rural, can't be small-town, and have that kind of connection if you want to go someplace with great services. That has turned out to be a great asset."Larson, who has moved to his retirement home near the lake in Park Rapids, Minn., with his wife, will be replaced by Steele County State's Attorney Charles Stock, who was appointed by the Traill County Commission to complete Larson's term. Since Larson retired halfway through his 10th term, the seat will be up for election in November 2018.What he said he will miss the most is the people he has gotten to know over the years. He had lunch with law enforcement officers once a week over the past 15 years."It's been a good 40 years. There are excellent people working in our courthouse. I had a really good working relationship with our county commissioners, all 20 of them," he said of past and present commissioners."It's people you are going to end up missing."...

North Dakota's longest-serving state's attorney currently in office retires - Grand Forks Herald

Monday, January 02, 2017

Hillsboro offers an excellent education through its schools, with the community accepting his family as one of their own.He also noted the location of Hillsboro, which sits halfway between Grand Forks and Fargo."One of the neat things is we are 45 minutes from either way, from two great communities: Grand Forks and Fargo," he said. "There are a lot of communities in this country that can't be rural, can't be small-town, and have that kind of connection if you want to go someplace with great services. That has turned out to be a great asset."Larson, who has moved to his retirement home near the lake in Park Rapids, Minn., with his wife, will be replaced by Steele County State's Attorney Charles Stock, who was appointed by the Traill County Commission to complete Larson's term. Since Larson retired halfway through his 10th term, the seat will be up for election in November 2018.What he said he will miss the most is the people he has gotten to know over the years. He had lunch with law enforcement officers once a week over the past 15 years."It's been a good 40 years. There are excellent people working in our courthouse. I had a really good working relationship with our county commissioners, all 20 of them," he said of past and present commissioners."It's people you are going to end up missing."This article passed through the Full-Text RSS service - if this is your content and you're reading it on someone else's site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.Recommended article: The Guardian's Summary of Julian Assange's Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Hurray for the Riff Raff Announces New LP 'The Navigator' - Glide Magazine

Monday, January 02, 2017

Friday Dec 9 at 10AM local time in the US (and Weds Dec 7 at 10AM UK time in the EU/UK).Track list:EntranceLiving in the CityHungry GhostLife to SaveNothing’s Gonna Change That GirlThe NavigatorHalfway ThereRican BeachFourteen FloorsSettlePa’lanteFinaleTour dates:January 18 - London UK – Sebright ArmsJanuary 19 - Newcastle UK – Cluny 2January 20 – Glasgow UK – Celtic Connections at DrygateJanuary 21- Bristol UK – The LanternJanuary 24 - Amsterdam ML – Paradiso, UpstairsMarch 20 - Leeds – BrudenellMarch 21 - Manchester UK – Deaf InstituteMarch 22 - London UK – The DomeMarch 23 - Winchester UK – The Railway InnMarch 25 - Brighton UK – Sticky MikesMarch 28 – Brussels BE – RotondeMarch 29 – Hamburg DE – HakkenMarch 30 – Berlin DE – Gruener SalonMarch 31 – Munich DE  – MillaApril 2 – Munster DE – American Series – PumpenhausApril 3 – Rotterdam NL – RotownApril 4 – Utrecht NL – EKKOApril 5 – Groningen NL –VeraApril 15 – Middlebury, VT –Middlebury CollegeApril 16 - Northampton, MA – Academy of MusicApril 18 - Cambridge, MA – SinclairApril 19 - Cambridge, MA – SinclairApril 20 – New York, NY – Bowery BallroomApril 21 – Philadelphia, PA – World Café (downstairs)April 23 – Washington, DC – 9:30 ClubApril 24 – Cincinnati, OH – Woodward TheaterApril 25 – Cleveland, OH – Beachland BallroomApril 27 – Detroit, MI – Magic BagApril 28 – Chicago, IL – Thalia HallApril 29 – Madison, WI – High Noon SaloonApril 30 – Minneapolis, MN – Fine Line Music CaféMay 2 – St. Louis, MO – Old Rock HouseMay 3 – Nashville, TN – Mercy LoungeMay 4 – Birmingham, AL – The SaturnMay 5 – New Orleans, LA – Civic Theatre*All US dates w/Ron GalloThis article passed through the Full-Text RSS service - if this is your content and you're reading it on someone else's site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.Recommended article: The Guardian's Summary of Julian Assange's Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Hillary Clinton had it right: It takes a village - Toledo Blade

Monday, December 12, 2016

I recently visited the small town where I grew up, the village of Sycamore down in Wyandot County, roughly halfway between Upper Sandusky, the county seat, and Tiffin in neighboring Seneca County. Sycamore is home to about 850 people. It’s one of those small farming communities that dot the countryside all across Ohio.Sycamore looks much the same as it did when I was a child. That’s comforting, although there are changes, for sure.One of the town’s two grain elevators was taken down last year, and the one that remains, visible for miles around, is also being dismantled. The railroad tracks that once bisected the village’s one main intersection were taken out years ago. The only school, which once housed all 12 grades, is long gone.But Sycamore remains true to its roots and values its history, which has been meticulously and lovingly preserved at the Mohawk Historical Society Museum. The museum sits at the same intersection where the trains used to rumble through.Exhibits highlight the village and county’s agricultural heritage, profile some of the characters who founded the community or hailed from it, and salute other Wyandot County towns such as McCutchenville (aka “Skutch”), Melmore, Belle Vernon, and a personal favorite, the quaintly named Deunquat.There’s artwork featuring the town’s connection to Great Lakes shipping and paying tribute to local ...

Mission's door is always open - Barre Montpelier Times Argus

Monday, November 28, 2016

In 1972, at the age of 16, Kevin Corliss gave his severely alcoholic father a ride to Rutland and never saw him again.“I brought him to a halfway house,” Corliss said Wednesday. “I don’t even remember the name of the house. It was a yellow building. It was up to me to bring him someplace he could be taken care of and not end up in jail, and that was the last time I saw him.”Two months ago, Corliss said, his wife decided to Google her father-in-law and came across the obituary of “Old Jim,” a beloved fixture at the Open Door Mission who died in May.He did not get to see his father again, but Corliss honored his memory Wednesday by volunteering at the Mission’s Thanksgiving dinner.Whatever happened to James Corliss — a Navy veteran who served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam — in that unnamed yellow halfway house, he eventually wound up on a Rutland park bench, where James Cassarino found him and brought him to the Mission in 1981.James Corliss suffered from a memory disorder triggered by his alcoholism, but he got sober at the Mission and later that year declared that he wanted to die there. He became the shelter’s cook — initially paid in cigarettes — and was described by successive directors as an invaluable resource.He got his wish in May, dying in the hallway outside his third-floor room, at the age of 89.Kevin Corliss lives in New Hampshire and works for LaValley Building supply — his job would bring ...

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Man who killed three in Fort Worth is first execution of 2017 - Fort Worth Star Telegram

Monday, January 23, 2017

Tarrant County taxpayers,” Sheard said Wednesday.‘I don’t care’ Wilkins arrived in Fort Worth in 2005 after stealing a pickup truck in Houston, where he was living in a halfway house. He had been released from a federal prison in California earlier that year.Christopher Chubasco Wilkins, 48, was the first person executed this year in the United States and the first of four men from Tarrant County scheduled to be put to death in Texas in 2017.Wilkins told jurors he killed Freeman because Freeman ripped him off in a drug deal and laughed at him. Freeman’s friend, Silva, was killed because he was in the wrong place at the wrong time.Prosecutors presented evidence that Wilkins decided to kill Freeman after Freeman tricked Wilkins into paying $20 for a piece of gravel that Freeman passed off as crack cocaine, court documents stated. Wilkins told Freeman he had a stash of drugs and guns across town and Silva agreed to drive them there. Wilkins shot Freeman in the back of the head during the trip on Oct. 28, 2005, and shot Silva three times as he tried to escape, according to appeals court documents. Vallejo was killed because he made Wilkins mad.Wilkins also said he nearly killed two more people — about a week after killing Freeman and Silva — when he ran them down on a sidewalk in a stolen car.During his trial, he made no excuses.“You can consider drugs if you want to,” Wilkins told jurors in 2008. “But I wouldn’t put too much weight on that. When I get wound up, I have a fuse that is short. I don’t think about what I am doing. I don’t care.”Texas adopted lethal injection as means of execution in 1977 and executed its first offender — Charlie Brooks of Tarrant County — by lethal injection Dec. 7, 1982.He was covered with tattoos, including images of demons, swastikas, even a portrait of Adolf Hitler, but told jurors they were mostly “just hype” and used as protection in prison.“Look, butterflies and flowers don’t work,” he said.When asked if he wanted to die, Wilkins thought for a second, then replied that he had nothing to live for.“I haven’t been any good to anybody for the last 20 years and I won’t be for the next 20 or the 20 after that,” Wilkins said.Wilkins’ testimony should be viewed as something that came from a person with brain damage, Sheard said. Psychological experts indicated that Wilkins had multiple head injuries and was exposed to LSD as a child, but that information was never provided to a jury, Sheard said.“Now, because he will be dead soon, we will never know,” she said.Wes Ball, one of Wilkins’ trial lawyers, described him as “candid to a degree you don’t see,” and had hoped his appearance on the witness stand would have made jurors like him, the AP reported. “It didn’t work,” Ball told the AP. “This guy is the classic outlaw in the model of Billy the Kid, an Old West-style outlaw,” Kevin Rousseau, the Tarrant County assistant district attorney who prosecuted Wilkins, told the AP. Downward trend Twenty convicted killers were executed in the U.S. last year, the lowest number since the early 1980s, according ...

North Dakota's longest-serving state's attorney currently in office retires - The Dickinson Press

Monday, January 09, 2017

Hillsboro offers an excellent education through its schools, with the community accepting his family as one of their own.He also noted the location of Hillsboro, which sits halfway between Grand Forks and Fargo."One of the neat things is we are 45 minutes from either way, from two great communities: Grand Forks and Fargo," he said. "There are a lot of communities in this country that can't be rural, can't be small-town, and have that kind of connection if you want to go someplace with great services. That has turned out to be a great asset."Larson, who has moved to his retirement home near the lake in Park Rapids, Minn., with his wife, will be replaced by Steele County State's Attorney Charles Stock, who was appointed by the Traill County Commission to complete Larson's term. Since Larson retired halfway through his 10th term, the seat will be up for election in November 2018.What he said he will miss the most is the people he has gotten to know over the years. He had lunch with law enforcement officers once a week over the past 15 years."It's been a good 40 years. There are excellent people working in our courthouse. I had a really good working relationship with our county commissioners, all 20 of them," he said of past and present commissioners."It's people you are going to end up missing."...

North Dakota's longest-serving state's attorney currently in office retires - Grand Forks Herald

Monday, January 02, 2017

Hillsboro offers an excellent education through its schools, with the community accepting his family as one of their own.He also noted the location of Hillsboro, which sits halfway between Grand Forks and Fargo."One of the neat things is we are 45 minutes from either way, from two great communities: Grand Forks and Fargo," he said. "There are a lot of communities in this country that can't be rural, can't be small-town, and have that kind of connection if you want to go someplace with great services. That has turned out to be a great asset."Larson, who has moved to his retirement home near the lake in Park Rapids, Minn., with his wife, will be replaced by Steele County State's Attorney Charles Stock, who was appointed by the Traill County Commission to complete Larson's term. Since Larson retired halfway through his 10th term, the seat will be up for election in November 2018.What he said he will miss the most is the people he has gotten to know over the years. He had lunch with law enforcement officers once a week over the past 15 years."It's been a good 40 years. There are excellent people working in our courthouse. I had a really good working relationship with our county commissioners, all 20 of them," he said of past and present commissioners."It's people you are going to end up missing."This article passed through the Full-Text RSS service - if this is your content and you're reading it on someone else's site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.Recommended article: The Guardian's Summary of Julian Assange's Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Hurray for the Riff Raff Announces New LP 'The Navigator' - Glide Magazine

Monday, January 02, 2017

Friday Dec 9 at 10AM local time in the US (and Weds Dec 7 at 10AM UK time in the EU/UK).Track list:EntranceLiving in the CityHungry GhostLife to SaveNothing’s Gonna Change That GirlThe NavigatorHalfway ThereRican BeachFourteen FloorsSettlePa’lanteFinaleTour dates:January 18 - London UK – Sebright ArmsJanuary 19 - Newcastle UK – Cluny 2January 20 – Glasgow UK – Celtic Connections at DrygateJanuary 21- Bristol UK – The LanternJanuary 24 - Amsterdam ML – Paradiso, UpstairsMarch 20 - Leeds – BrudenellMarch 21 - Manchester UK – Deaf InstituteMarch 22 - London UK – The DomeMarch 23 - Winchester UK – The Railway InnMarch 25 - Brighton UK – Sticky MikesMarch 28 – Brussels BE – RotondeMarch 29 – Hamburg DE – HakkenMarch 30 – Berlin DE – Gruener SalonMarch 31 – Munich DE  – MillaApril 2 – Munster DE – American Series – PumpenhausApril 3 – Rotterdam NL – RotownApril 4 – Utrecht NL – EKKOApril 5 – Groningen NL –VeraApril 15 – Middlebury, VT –Middlebury CollegeApril 16 - Northampton, MA – Academy of MusicApril 18 - Cambridge, MA – SinclairApril 19 - Cambridge, MA – SinclairApril 20 – New York, NY – Bowery BallroomApril 21 – Philadelphia, PA – World Café (downstairs)April 23 – Washington, DC – 9:30 ClubApril 24 – Cincinnati, OH – Woodward TheaterApril 25 – Cleveland, OH – Beachland BallroomApril 27 – Detroit, MI – Magic BagApril 28 – Chicago, IL – Thalia HallApril 29 – Madison, WI – High Noon SaloonApril 30 – Minneapolis, MN – Fine Line Music CaféMay 2 – St. Louis, MO – Old Rock HouseMay 3 – Nashville, TN – Mercy LoungeMay 4 – Birmingham, AL – The SaturnMay 5 – New Orleans, LA – Civic Theatre*All US dates w/Ron GalloThis article passed through the Full-Text RSS service - if this is your content and you're reading it on someone else's site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.Recommended article: The Guardian's Summary of Julian Assange's Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Hillary Clinton had it right: It takes a village - Toledo Blade

Monday, December 12, 2016

I recently visited the small town where I grew up, the village of Sycamore down in Wyandot County, roughly halfway between Upper Sandusky, the county seat, and Tiffin in neighboring Seneca County. Sycamore is home to about 850 people. It’s one of those small farming communities that dot the countryside all across Ohio.Sycamore looks much the same as it did when I was a child. That’s comforting, although there are changes, for sure.One of the town’s two grain elevators was taken down last year, and the one that remains, visible for miles around, is also being dismantled. The railroad tracks that once bisected the village’s one main intersection were taken out years ago. The only school, which once housed all 12 grades, is long gone.But Sycamore remains true to its roots and values its history, which has been meticulously and lovingly preserved at the Mohawk Historical Society Museum. The museum sits at the same intersection where the trains used to rumble through.Exhibits highlight the village and county’s agricultural heritage, profile some of the characters who founded the community or hailed from it, and salute other Wyandot County towns such as McCutchenville (aka “Skutch”), Melmore, Belle Vernon, and a personal favorite, the quaintly named Deunquat.There’s artwork featuring the town’s connection to Great Lakes shipping and paying tribute to local ...

Mission's door is always open - Barre Montpelier Times Argus

Monday, November 28, 2016

In 1972, at the age of 16, Kevin Corliss gave his severely alcoholic father a ride to Rutland and never saw him again.“I brought him to a halfway house,” Corliss said Wednesday. “I don’t even remember the name of the house. It was a yellow building. It was up to me to bring him someplace he could be taken care of and not end up in jail, and that was the last time I saw him.”Two months ago, Corliss said, his wife decided to Google her father-in-law and came across the obituary of “Old Jim,” a beloved fixture at the Open Door Mission who died in May.He did not get to see his father again, but Corliss honored his memory Wednesday by volunteering at the Mission’s Thanksgiving dinner.Whatever happened to James Corliss — a Navy veteran who served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam — in that unnamed yellow halfway house, he eventually wound up on a Rutland park bench, where James Cassarino found him and brought him to the Mission in 1981.James Corliss suffered from a memory disorder triggered by his alcoholism, but he got sober at the Mission and later that year declared that he wanted to die there. He became the shelter’s cook — initially paid in cigarettes — and was described by successive directors as an invaluable resource.He got his wish in May, dying in the hallway outside his third-floor room, at the age of 89.Kevin Corliss lives in New Hampshire and works for LaValley Building supply — his job would bring ...