Appomattox VA Funeral Homes

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Bruce and Stiff Funeral Home

Highway 24
Appomattox, VA 24522
(434) 352-2368
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Robinson Funeral Home

601 Court
Appomattox, VA
(434) 352-7111
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Appomattox VA Obituaries and Death Notices

Idaho Patriot Guard Riders to help bring Civil War veteran home - Idaho Statesman

Monday, August 01, 2016

Infantry Regiment. The regiment took part in three battles near Petersburg, Va., in late 1864 and early 1865.It also participated in Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s April 9, 1865, surrender at the Appomattox Courthouse and later marched to Washington, D.C., where a military procession and celebration dubbed the Grand Review of the Armies took place on May 23 and 24, 1865.Monday morning in Salem, the Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs will transfer Williams’ remains to the Oregon chapter of the Patriot Guard Riders. Civil War re-enactors dressed in period 20th Maine uniforms will serve as a color guard.The Idaho riders will take possession of the remains Monday night at the Pilot Travel Center in Ontario, Ore. They will be held overnight, along with a folded American flag, at the Cloverdale Funeral Home, 1200 N. Cloverdale Road.At 7 a.m. Tuesday, a flag line to honor Williams will form outside the funeral home as the remains are loaded for the rest of the trip through Idaho. Veterans and others wishing to pay respects to Williams are invited to attend, said Bell, a veteran of the Vietnam War.Additional stops will take place in Mountain Home, Twin Falls, Pocatello and Idaho Falls. The remains will pass to a Montana group at Monida, Mont., 80 miles north of Idaho Falls, about 3 p.m. Tuesday.The remains are scheduled to arrive in Maine on Aug. 22.“It feels great to finally do justice by him and give him the honor he deserves — a burial in a national cemetery with full military honors,” said Tom Desjardin, a Maine historian who learned that Williams’ remains were stored at the Oregon hospital.‘PROPER CREDIT’Desjardin, former Maine commissioner of education and an 11th-generation Maine resident, has studied the 20th Maine for more than four decades. He has collected information on the burial sites for 700 of the unit’s veterans, about half of the total.During a meeting last year of Maine Gov. Paul LePage’s Cabinet, Desjardin...

Civil War vet's ashes are on motorcycle ride across America - Huntington Herald Dispatch

Monday, August 01, 2016

Williams, of Hodgdon, Maine, joined in October 1864. His regiment was at the siege of Petersburg, Virginia, and in battles with the rebels right up to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox, Virginia, in April 1865, said Maine historian Tom Desjardin."The New Englanders were actively engaged with Grant's army in the long siege of Petersburg and the running fight with Lee to Appomattox," said James I. Robertson Jr., retired professor of Civil War history at Virginia Tech.Jewett shared a tent with his cousin, Albert Williams, who in a letter, reflecting his rudimentary education described long marches in bad weather and sleeping in the open, according to a family history published online in 2005 by Barbara Ann Estabrook. He also described a scorched-earth campaign."i didnt have a chance to get a shot at a reb when we on the rode but i made the Cattle and Sheep and hogs suffer. You bet we killed every thing that we see and burnt every thing as we went," Albert Williams wrote on Dec. 18, 1864, less than four months before he died of fever at age 21.Jewett Williams was married and divorced, then remarried and moved to Michigan, then to Minnesota where he was a carpenter. Their first child died after only 19 months. They had five more children and moved to Washington state, where the couple separated. In the 1920 census, Williams was listed as a widower in Portland, Oregon.In April 1922, Williams was admitted to the Oregon State Hospital for the Insane in Salem, as the hospital was then known. He died on July 17, 1922, at 78, of cerebral arteriosclerosis.None of Jewett's descendants has been found.His remains are scheduled to arrive in Maine on Aug. 22 and will be buried with military honors in Togus National Cemetery in Maine on Sept. 17. A period-correct white marble veterans headstone will mark the spot, said Dave Richmond, deputy director of the Maine Bureau of Veterans' Services."He will rejoin his comrades-in-arms in Maine," said Greg Roberts, the superintendent of Oregon State Hospital. Also buried at Togus are five other 20th Maine veterans, including one from Company H.

— Anderson Cooper - New York Times

Sunday, June 19, 2016

May 13, 1864. Credit Mathew B. Brady, via Associated Press Of course, it took all summer, all fall, all winter and part of the spring until the surrender of Lee’s army at Appomattox in April 1865. Again, through it all, Grant displayed extraordinary fortitude and quiet determination in dealing with the enormous pressures on him — and then displayed remarkable magnanimity and respect in agreeing to the terms of Lee’s surrender.After the war Grant dealt calmly but firmly with the erratic behavior of President Andrew Johnson in the wake of Lincoln’s assassination. And although as president (1869-77) he was tarnished by financial scandal after placing too much trust in some members of his cabinet, he sought to be compassionate during the Indian Wars and in the conduct of Reconstruction, and demonstrated integrity in guiding the nation through a host of financial crises.And he was modest and unassuming in all that he did. Toward the end of his life, when facing financial ruin — a result of misplaced faith in his investment advisers — he turned down charity from admirers and sought to secure his family’s future by writing his memoirs. They are still regarded as the most literate, forthright memoirs of any major American military figure.With the help of Mark Twain, the memoirs were an enormous commercial success when published after Grant died, on July 23, 1885, at an Adirondacks retreat. Twain, by the way, was among the earliest members of the Lotos Club.For me, Grant was always captured best in the pithy response he offered to Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, his most trusted commander, after the nearly disastrous first day of the Battle of Shiloh in 1862, when Grant’s army was almost pushed back into the Tennessee River. Sherman had emerged from the darkness to encounter Grant sitting under a tree with the rain dripping off his slouch hat.“Well, Grant,” Sherman said, “we’ve had the devil’s own day today, haven’t we.”“Yep,” Grant replied, taking a soggy cigar out of his mouth. “Lick ‘em tomorrow, though.”And he and his army did just that – all the way to Appomattox.Read the obituary “A Hero Finds Rest”...

Tough Questions for Both Sides From Tim Russert - New York Times

Monday, June 13, 2016

May 13, 1864. Credit Mathew B. Brady, via Associated Press Of course, it took all summer, all fall, all winter and part of the spring until the surrender of Lee’s army at Appomattox in April 1865. Again, through it all, Grant displayed extraordinary fortitude and quiet determination in dealing with the enormous pressures on him — and then displayed remarkable magnanimity and respect in agreeing to the terms of Lee’s surrender.After the war Grant dealt calmly but firmly with the erratic behavior of President Andrew Johnson in the wake of Lincoln’s assassination. And although as president (1869-77) he was tarnished by financial scandal after placing too much trust in some members of his cabinet, he sought to be compassionate during the Indian Wars and in the conduct of Reconstruction, and demonstrated integrity in guiding the nation through a host of financial crises.And he was modest and unassuming in all that he did. Toward the end of his life, when facing financial ruin — a result of misplaced faith in his investment advisers — he turned down charity from admirers and sought to secure his family’s future by writing his memoirs. They are still regarded as the most literate, forthright memoirs of any major American military figure.With the help of Mark Twain, the memoirs were an enormous commercial success when published after Grant died, on July 23, 1885, at an Adirondacks retreat. Twain, by the way, was among the earliest members of the Lotos Club.For me, Grant was always captured best in the pithy response he offered to Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, his most trusted commander, after the nearly disastrous first day of the Battle of Shiloh in 1862, when Grant’s army was almost pushed back into the Tennessee River. Sherman had emerged from the darkness to encounter Grant sitting under a tree with the rain dripping off his slouch hat.“Well, Grant,” Sherman said, “we’ve had the devil’s own day today, haven’t we.”“Yep,” Grant replied, taking a soggy cigar out of his mouth. “Lick ‘em tomorrow, though.”And he and his army did just that – all the way to Appomattox.Read the obituary “A Hero Finds Rest”...

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Idaho Patriot Guard Riders to help bring Civil War veteran home - Idaho Statesman

Monday, August 01, 2016

Infantry Regiment. The regiment took part in three battles near Petersburg, Va., in late 1864 and early 1865.It also participated in Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s April 9, 1865, surrender at the Appomattox Courthouse and later marched to Washington, D.C., where a military procession and celebration dubbed the Grand Review of the Armies took place on May 23 and 24, 1865.Monday morning in Salem, the Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs will transfer Williams’ remains to the Oregon chapter of the Patriot Guard Riders. Civil War re-enactors dressed in period 20th Maine uniforms will serve as a color guard.The Idaho riders will take possession of the remains Monday night at the Pilot Travel Center in Ontario, Ore. They will be held overnight, along with a folded American flag, at the Cloverdale Funeral Home, 1200 N. Cloverdale Road.At 7 a.m. Tuesday, a flag line to honor Williams will form outside the funeral home as the remains are loaded for the rest of the trip through Idaho. Veterans and others wishing to pay respects to Williams are invited to attend, said Bell, a veteran of the Vietnam War.Additional stops will take place in Mountain Home, Twin Falls, Pocatello and Idaho Falls. The remains will pass to a Montana group at Monida, Mont., 80 miles north of Idaho Falls, about 3 p.m. Tuesday.The remains are scheduled to arrive in Maine on Aug. 22.“It feels great to finally do justice by him and give him the honor he deserves — a burial in a national cemetery with full military honors,” said Tom Desjardin, a Maine historian who learned that Williams’ remains were stored at the Oregon hospital.‘PROPER CREDIT’Desjardin, former Maine commissioner of education and an 11th-generation Maine resident, has studied the 20th Maine for more than four decades. He has collected information on the burial sites for 700 of the unit’s veterans, about half of the total.During a meeting last year of Maine Gov. Paul LePage’s Cabinet, Desjardin...

Civil War vet's ashes are on motorcycle ride across America - Huntington Herald Dispatch

Monday, August 01, 2016

Williams, of Hodgdon, Maine, joined in October 1864. His regiment was at the siege of Petersburg, Virginia, and in battles with the rebels right up to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox, Virginia, in April 1865, said Maine historian Tom Desjardin."The New Englanders were actively engaged with Grant's army in the long siege of Petersburg and the running fight with Lee to Appomattox," said James I. Robertson Jr., retired professor of Civil War history at Virginia Tech.Jewett shared a tent with his cousin, Albert Williams, who in a letter, reflecting his rudimentary education described long marches in bad weather and sleeping in the open, according to a family history published online in 2005 by Barbara Ann Estabrook. He also described a scorched-earth campaign."i didnt have a chance to get a shot at a reb when we on the rode but i made the Cattle and Sheep and hogs suffer. You bet we killed every thing that we see and burnt every thing as we went," Albert Williams wrote on Dec. 18, 1864, less than four months before he died of fever at age 21.Jewett Williams was married and divorced, then remarried and moved to Michigan, then to Minnesota where he was a carpenter. Their first child died after only 19 months. They had five more children and moved to Washington state, where the couple separated. In the 1920 census, Williams was listed as a widower in Portland, Oregon.In April 1922, Williams was admitted to the Oregon State Hospital for the Insane in Salem, as the hospital was then known. He died on July 17, 1922, at 78, of cerebral arteriosclerosis.None of Jewett's descendants has been found.His remains are scheduled to arrive in Maine on Aug. 22 and will be buried with military honors in Togus National Cemetery in Maine on Sept. 17. A period-correct white marble veterans headstone will mark the spot, said Dave Richmond, deputy director of the Maine Bureau of Veterans' Services."He will rejoin his comrades-in-arms in Maine," said Greg Roberts, the superintendent of Oregon State Hospital. Also buried at Togus are five other 20th Maine veterans, including one from Company H.

— Anderson Cooper - New York Times

Sunday, June 19, 2016

May 13, 1864. Credit Mathew B. Brady, via Associated Press Of course, it took all summer, all fall, all winter and part of the spring until the surrender of Lee’s army at Appomattox in April 1865. Again, through it all, Grant displayed extraordinary fortitude and quiet determination in dealing with the enormous pressures on him — and then displayed remarkable magnanimity and respect in agreeing to the terms of Lee’s surrender.After the war Grant dealt calmly but firmly with the erratic behavior of President Andrew Johnson in the wake of Lincoln’s assassination. And although as president (1869-77) he was tarnished by financial scandal after placing too much trust in some members of his cabinet, he sought to be compassionate during the Indian Wars and in the conduct of Reconstruction, and demonstrated integrity in guiding the nation through a host of financial crises.And he was modest and unassuming in all that he did. Toward the end of his life, when facing financial ruin — a result of misplaced faith in his investment advisers — he turned down charity from admirers and sought to secure his family’s future by writing his memoirs. They are still regarded as the most literate, forthright memoirs of any major American military figure.With the help of Mark Twain, the memoirs were an enormous commercial success when published after Grant died, on July 23, 1885, at an Adirondacks retreat. Twain, by the way, was among the earliest members of the Lotos Club.For me, Grant was always captured best in the pithy response he offered to Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, his most trusted commander, after the nearly disastrous first day of the Battle of Shiloh in 1862, when Grant’s army was almost pushed back into the Tennessee River. Sherman had emerged from the darkness to encounter Grant sitting under a tree with the rain dripping off his slouch hat.“Well, Grant,” Sherman said, “we’ve had the devil’s own day today, haven’t we.”“Yep,” Grant replied, taking a soggy cigar out of his mouth. “Lick ‘em tomorrow, though.”And he and his army did just that – all the way to Appomattox.Read the obituary “A Hero Finds Rest”...

Tough Questions for Both Sides From Tim Russert - New York Times

Monday, June 13, 2016

May 13, 1864. Credit Mathew B. Brady, via Associated Press Of course, it took all summer, all fall, all winter and part of the spring until the surrender of Lee’s army at Appomattox in April 1865. Again, through it all, Grant displayed extraordinary fortitude and quiet determination in dealing with the enormous pressures on him — and then displayed remarkable magnanimity and respect in agreeing to the terms of Lee’s surrender.After the war Grant dealt calmly but firmly with the erratic behavior of President Andrew Johnson in the wake of Lincoln’s assassination. And although as president (1869-77) he was tarnished by financial scandal after placing too much trust in some members of his cabinet, he sought to be compassionate during the Indian Wars and in the conduct of Reconstruction, and demonstrated integrity in guiding the nation through a host of financial crises.And he was modest and unassuming in all that he did. Toward the end of his life, when facing financial ruin — a result of misplaced faith in his investment advisers — he turned down charity from admirers and sought to secure his family’s future by writing his memoirs. They are still regarded as the most literate, forthright memoirs of any major American military figure.With the help of Mark Twain, the memoirs were an enormous commercial success when published after Grant died, on July 23, 1885, at an Adirondacks retreat. Twain, by the way, was among the earliest members of the Lotos Club.For me, Grant was always captured best in the pithy response he offered to Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, his most trusted commander, after the nearly disastrous first day of the Battle of Shiloh in 1862, when Grant’s army was almost pushed back into the Tennessee River. Sherman had emerged from the darkness to encounter Grant sitting under a tree with the rain dripping off his slouch hat.“Well, Grant,” Sherman said, “we’ve had the devil’s own day today, haven’t we.”“Yep,” Grant replied, taking a soggy cigar out of his mouth. “Lick ‘em tomorrow, though.”And he and his army did just that – all the way to Appomattox.Read the obituary “A Hero Finds Rest”...