Bluefield WV Funeral Homes

Bluefield WV funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Cravens Shires Funeral Homes Inc , Mercer Funeral Home and Crematory by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Bluefield funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

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Cravens Shires Funeral Homes Inc

3431 Coal Heritage Road
Bluefield, WV 24701
(304) 589-3860
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McConnell Funeral Home

260 Cherry Street
Bluefield, WV 24701
(304) 327-5259
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Mercer Funeral Home and Crematory

1231 West Cumberland Road
Bluefield, WV 24701
(304) 327-6155
Mercer Funeral Home and Crematory funeral flowers

Monte Vista Park Cemetery Association

Old Bluefield Prince
Bluefield, WV 24739
(304) 327-6513
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Bluefield WV Obituaries and Death Notices

Phyllis Fox

Monday, February 27, 2017

Phyllis Ann Brown Fox was reunited with her daughter Becky and her parents on Saturday, February 18th. Phyllis was born on December 12, 1927 in Bluefield, West Virginia to Sallie and Henry Brown. Phyllis was an only child. She grew up in Bluefield where she attended Wade Elementary and the local Junior High School, then graduated from Beaver High School. She loved playing the clarinet in the high school band. After graduation from high school, Phyllis attended Concord College, majoring in Home Economics Education. She graduated in January 1949 and started teaching Home Economics at Pocahontas High School. Phyllis met the love of her life, David S. Fox, in April 1948. David was serving as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served in the Bluefield area. After his mission, David returned to West Virginia and attended Concord College. While in college, David and Phyllis dated and were married on April 15, 1949 in the home of Phyllis’s parents. Before David and Phyllis were married, they had received special permission to first get married and then a few months later be sealed in the templ...

Life was never the same after the old 460 was four-laned - Bluefield Daily Telegraph

Monday, August 22, 2016

Littlesburg when the reservoir was built. A beautiful piece of land and small farm. Gone. For progress.Well, now I can leave Roanoke, take Exit 118B at Christiansburg and drive straight to Bluefield, all on a nice four-lane highway.A trip that used to take more than three hours now takes about half that time.That, admittedly, is progress.I enjoy the time saved, the convenience, of course. That part is great. The scenery continues to be nice as well.With the time, gas and money saved by having such a nice highway, it is easy to justify constructing it in the first place.We all understand that. Besides, with the volume of traffic these days, that old 460 would simply not be enough to handle it. Yet, I can’t help but feel a sense of remorse about what happened, not only for my family but for all the families and businesses that were impacted.Life was never really the same after that. Our hearts changed, as did the landscape.A real sense of community was lost. Not only that, as a driver and as a person who loves to travel, I enjoy riding on older roads and seeing life off the four-lanes, away from the interstates.It’s like being on an airplane, looking down at earth and seeing forests, roads, cities, waterways and houses. Seeing, but not really experiencing it.Actually driving through all of these small towns and communities, along creeks and railroad tracks, winding through and across the hills — there is nothing quite like it.It gives such a sense of being alive and being connected and feeling comfortable. Just like being at Aunt Tham’s house.That is, if you’re not in a hurry, which we all seem to be in these days. Oh well, I guess that’s progress too. Charles Boothe is a reporter for the Bluefield Daily Telegraph and can be reached at cboothe@bdtonline.com...

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Phyllis Fox

Monday, February 27, 2017

Phyllis Ann Brown Fox was reunited with her daughter Becky and her parents on Saturday, February 18th. Phyllis was born on December 12, 1927 in Bluefield, West Virginia to Sallie and Henry Brown. Phyllis was an only child. She grew up in Bluefield where she attended Wade Elementary and the local Junior High School, then graduated from Beaver High School. She loved playing the clarinet in the high school band. After graduation from high school, Phyllis attended Concord College, majoring in Home Economics Education. She graduated in January 1949 and started teaching Home Economics at Pocahontas High School. Phyllis met the love of her life, David S. Fox, in April 1948. David was serving as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served in the Bluefield area. After his mission, David returned to West Virginia and attended Concord College. While in college, David and Phyllis dated and were married on April 15, 1949 in the home of Phyllis’s parents. Before David and Phyllis were married, they had received special permission to first get married and then a few months later be sealed in the templ...

Life was never the same after the old 460 was four-laned - Bluefield Daily Telegraph

Monday, August 22, 2016

Littlesburg when the reservoir was built. A beautiful piece of land and small farm. Gone. For progress.Well, now I can leave Roanoke, take Exit 118B at Christiansburg and drive straight to Bluefield, all on a nice four-lane highway.A trip that used to take more than three hours now takes about half that time.That, admittedly, is progress.I enjoy the time saved, the convenience, of course. That part is great. The scenery continues to be nice as well.With the time, gas and money saved by having such a nice highway, it is easy to justify constructing it in the first place.We all understand that. Besides, with the volume of traffic these days, that old 460 would simply not be enough to handle it. Yet, I can’t help but feel a sense of remorse about what happened, not only for my family but for all the families and businesses that were impacted.Life was never really the same after that. Our hearts changed, as did the landscape.A real sense of community was lost. Not only that, as a driver and as a person who loves to travel, I enjoy riding on older roads and seeing life off the four-lanes, away from the interstates.It’s like being on an airplane, looking down at earth and seeing forests, roads, cities, waterways and houses. Seeing, but not really experiencing it.Actually driving through all of these small towns and communities, along creeks and railroad tracks, winding through and across the hills — there is nothing quite like it.It gives such a sense of being alive and being connected and feeling comfortable. Just like being at Aunt Tham’s house.That is, if you’re not in a hurry, which we all seem to be in these days. Oh well, I guess that’s progress too. Charles Boothe is a reporter for the Bluefield Daily Telegraph and can be reached at cboothe@bdtonline.com...