Bloomer WI Funeral Homes

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Olson Funeral Home

1516 Larson Street
Bloomer, WI 54724
(715) 568-5250
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Bloomer WI Obituaries and Death Notices

Stanley Newton

Monday, June 26, 2017

City, MO.; one brother, Scott Newton of Jefferson City, MO.; one sister, Kathy Volkerding (husband Bob) of Jefferson City, MO.; his niece, Leslie Chiles (husband Dave); and three nephews, Brian Bloomer (wife Susan), Shannon Newton (wife Bree), and Kaleb Newton.Visitation will be at Freeman Mortuary from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. Friday, June 23, 2017.Funeral services will be conducted at 12:00 p.m. Friday, June 23, 2017 in the Freeman Chapel with the Reverend Dr. Monte Shinkle officiating. Graveside services and interment will be held at Riverview Cemetery.In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions are suggested to the Alabaster Ministries, 8514 North Donna Ct., Kansas City, Mo. 64153 Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Freeman Mortuary.

Alice Bloomer - Shawnee News Star

Monday, December 05, 2016

MARIETTA — Services for Alice Bloomer, 67, of Marietta, are scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, in the Chapel of Flanagan-Watts Funeral Home, Marietta, with Bro. Mike Johnston officiating. Interment will be in the Jimtown Cemetery, Jimtown, Okla., under the direction of Flanagan-Watts Funeral Home & Cremation Services.The daughter of J.C. Power Jr. and Ruby Smith Power, Alice was born at Jimtown on Jan. 10, 1949. She passed away at her residence in Marietta Wednesday, Nov. 30.A 1967 graduate of Turner High School, Alice had been a resident of Love County all of her life. She was a homemaker who loved playing Farkle with her children and grandchildren as well as dominoes and marbles. Alice and Don Bloomer were married at Falconhead on Sept. 17, 1998, and he preceded her in death on Dec. 12, 2010. Alice was a member of the Jimtown Baptist Church.In addition to her husband, she was preceded in death by her father, J.C. Power Jr. on Feb. 1, 2008; and son, Jimmy Hartman on Nov. 15, 1995.She is survived by h...

WAY BACK WHEN IN WAYNE COUNTY: Women's rights advocate welcomed in S. Butler - Finger Lakes Times

Monday, July 04, 2016

So, she turned to social reform and speaking tours for the cause of women’s rights.As she traveled she met many of the leading thinkers and reformers of that age — Susan B. Anthony, Amelia Bloomer, William Lloyd Garrison, Henry Ward Beecher, Thoreau and many others.Brown’s first venture into public life was her attendance at an anti-slavery convention in Oswego. After a convention in Massachusetts (which earned her a reputation as a fine speaker) she began to tour, speaking on abolitionism and women’s rights. At that time she also began serving as guest minister in the more progressive churches along her route.It was on one of these speaking tours that she arrived in South Butler, where she was invited to speak at the July 4, 1853, celebration. This was the first time that a woman had given an Independence Day Address. After hearing her speak, the small Congregational Parish asked her to become its pastor. Brown moved to South Butler in the spring of 1853. She preached two sermons each Sunday and earned a salary of $300 per year. In late summer, the congregation decided to conduct her ordination ceremony as a public statement about women’s rights. Because the roof on the Congregational Church leaked, the ceremony was held in the Baptist Church across the street. This was the second time she made history, Sept. 15, 1853. On that day, Antoinette Brown was ordained the first woman minister in the United States.Brown stayed in South Butler less than a year after her ordination. People refused to accept her idea of a gentle, loving God. They still held to the concept of God as fierce, cruel and vengeful.In 1856, Antoinette married Samuel Blackwell, brother of Elizabeth Blackwell, the first women to receive a medical degree in the United States. Samuel and Antoinette had five daughters, but she continued to carried on a busy schedule of lectures, wrote 10 books, many poems, essays and hundreds of articles.In 1878, Oberlin College finally awarded her an honorary master’s degree and in 1908 a doctoral degree. She preached her last sermon at the age of 90 in the Unitarian Church in Elizabeth, N.J. In 1920, she voted in the first presidential election in which women were allowed to do so, the only suffragette still alive.Antoinette Brown Blackwell died in her sleep on Nov. 9, 1921, at the age of 96. On Oct. 9, 1993, she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls. On Sept. 13, 2003, the Butler Historical Preservation Society celebrated the 150th anniversary of her ordination with a ceremony at the Lighthouse Fellowship Church in South Butler. A marker recognizing her ordination was placed near the four corners in South Butler.Antoinette Brown Blackwell was a pioneer in women’s rights who made history twice in the small town of South Butler.Wiggins is the Butler town historian.

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Bloomer News

Stanley Newton

Monday, June 26, 2017

City, MO.; one brother, Scott Newton of Jefferson City, MO.; one sister, Kathy Volkerding (husband Bob) of Jefferson City, MO.; his niece, Leslie Chiles (husband Dave); and three nephews, Brian Bloomer (wife Susan), Shannon Newton (wife Bree), and Kaleb Newton.Visitation will be at Freeman Mortuary from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. Friday, June 23, 2017.Funeral services will be conducted at 12:00 p.m. Friday, June 23, 2017 in the Freeman Chapel with the Reverend Dr. Monte Shinkle officiating. Graveside services and interment will be held at Riverview Cemetery.In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions are suggested to the Alabaster Ministries, 8514 North Donna Ct., Kansas City, Mo. 64153 Funeral arrangements are under the direction of Freeman Mortuary.

Alice Bloomer - Shawnee News Star

Monday, December 05, 2016

MARIETTA — Services for Alice Bloomer, 67, of Marietta, are scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, in the Chapel of Flanagan-Watts Funeral Home, Marietta, with Bro. Mike Johnston officiating. Interment will be in the Jimtown Cemetery, Jimtown, Okla., under the direction of Flanagan-Watts Funeral Home & Cremation Services.The daughter of J.C. Power Jr. and Ruby Smith Power, Alice was born at Jimtown on Jan. 10, 1949. She passed away at her residence in Marietta Wednesday, Nov. 30.A 1967 graduate of Turner High School, Alice had been a resident of Love County all of her life. She was a homemaker who loved playing Farkle with her children and grandchildren as well as dominoes and marbles. Alice and Don Bloomer were married at Falconhead on Sept. 17, 1998, and he preceded her in death on Dec. 12, 2010. Alice was a member of the Jimtown Baptist Church.In addition to her husband, she was preceded in death by her father, J.C. Power Jr. on Feb. 1, 2008; and son, Jimmy Hartman on Nov. 15, 1995.She is survived by h...

WAY BACK WHEN IN WAYNE COUNTY: Women's rights advocate welcomed in S. Butler - Finger Lakes Times

Monday, July 04, 2016

So, she turned to social reform and speaking tours for the cause of women’s rights.As she traveled she met many of the leading thinkers and reformers of that age — Susan B. Anthony, Amelia Bloomer, William Lloyd Garrison, Henry Ward Beecher, Thoreau and many others.Brown’s first venture into public life was her attendance at an anti-slavery convention in Oswego. After a convention in Massachusetts (which earned her a reputation as a fine speaker) she began to tour, speaking on abolitionism and women’s rights. At that time she also began serving as guest minister in the more progressive churches along her route.It was on one of these speaking tours that she arrived in South Butler, where she was invited to speak at the July 4, 1853, celebration. This was the first time that a woman had given an Independence Day Address. After hearing her speak, the small Congregational Parish asked her to become its pastor. Brown moved to South Butler in the spring of 1853. She preached two sermons each Sunday and earned a salary of $300 per year. In late summer, the congregation decided to conduct her ordination ceremony as a public statement about women’s rights. Because the roof on the Congregational Church leaked, the ceremony was held in the Baptist Church across the street. This was the second time she made history, Sept. 15, 1853. On that day, Antoinette Brown was ordained the first woman minister in the United States.Brown stayed in South Butler less than a year after her ordination. People refused to accept her idea of a gentle, loving God. They still held to the concept of God as fierce, cruel and vengeful.In 1856, Antoinette married Samuel Blackwell, brother of Elizabeth Blackwell, the first women to receive a medical degree in the United States. Samuel and Antoinette had five daughters, but she continued to carried on a busy schedule of lectures, wrote 10 books, many poems, essays and hundreds of articles.In 1878, Oberlin College finally awarded her an honorary master’s degree and in 1908 a doctoral degree. She preached her last sermon at the age of 90 in the Unitarian Church in Elizabeth, N.J. In 1920, she voted in the first presidential election in which women were allowed to do so, the only suffragette still alive.Antoinette Brown Blackwell died in her sleep on Nov. 9, 1921, at the age of 96. On Oct. 9, 1993, she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls. On Sept. 13, 2003, the Butler Historical Preservation Society celebrated the 150th anniversary of her ordination with a ceremony at the Lighthouse Fellowship Church in South Butler. A marker recognizing her ordination was placed near the four corners in South Butler.Antoinette Brown Blackwell was a pioneer in women’s rights who made history twice in the small town of South Butler.Wiggins is the Butler town historian.