Gilman WI Funeral Homes

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Gilman Funeral Home

135 West Riverside Drive
Gilman, WI 54433
(715) 447-8235
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Gilman WI Obituaries and Death Notices

Flutist Irvin Gilman, chamber ensemble founder, died earlier this month - Albany Times Union (blog)

Monday, February 27, 2017

Irvin Gilman, the flutist and saxophonist who co-founded Capitol Chamber Artists more than 40 years ago, died on Feb. 2.A longtime and much-loved member of the region’s classical music community, he would have turned 91 this Wednesday, March 1.The news was announced by his wife of 35 years and CCA co-founder, violinist Mary Lou Saetta. The complete obituary is below.To read Steve Barnes’ piece on Gilman on his return to performing in 2012 after breaking his neck in a fall, click here.IRVIN EDWARD GILMAN (1926-2017) died on Feb. 2, one month short of his 91st birthday. Irv was co-founder and flutist/saxophonist with Capitol Chamber Artists for over 40 years. He was a member for 12 years of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Professor of Music at the University of Albany, for 15 years was Principal flutist with the Albany Symphony Orchestra.He may be heard in solo and chamber music recordings on Centaur and Albany Records and orchestral and jazz recordings on Motown, RCA Victor and Mercury Record...

Film Shorts - Fort Worth Weekly (satire) (blog)

Monday, January 30, 2017

Friday)Paterson (R) Jim Jarmusch’s latest film stars Adam Driver as a bus driver in Paterson, N.J., who writes poetry in his spare time. Also with Golshifteh Farahani, Barry Shabaka Henley, Jared Gilman, Kara Heyward, Masatoshi Nagase, and Method Man. (Opens Friday in Dallas)Raees (NR) Shah Rukh Khan stars in this biography of Raees Alam, a bootlegger who built a criminal empire in the alcohol-free state of Gujarat in the 1980s. Also with Sunny Leone, Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Mahira Khan, Rupinder Nagra, and Mohammed Zeeshan Ayyub. (Opens Friday at AMC Grapevine Mills)Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (R) Milla Jovovich’s farewell to the long-running series has her making one last stand against the zombies and the corporation that created them. Also with Ali Larter, Ruby Rose, Shawn Roberts, William Levy, Lee Joon-gi, Rola, Eoin Macken, and Iain Glen. (Opens Friday)Toni Erdmann (R) Maren Ade’s Oscar-nominated comedy is about an elderly German retiree (Peter Simonischek) who travels to Bucharest and takes eccentric measures to pull his daughter (Sandra Hüller) out of her unsatisfying life as a corporate consultant. Also with Michael Wittenborn, Thomas Loibl, Tristan Pütter, Ingrid Bisu, Hadewych Minis, Vlad Ivanov, and Lucy Russell. (Opens Friday in Dallas)The Woman Who Left (NR) Charo Santos-Conocio stars in this Filipino thriller as a wrongfully imprisoned woman who seeks revenge on her former lover. Also with John Lloyd Cruz, Michael de Mesa, Nonie Buencamino, and Mae Paner. (Opens Friday at AMC Grapevine Mills)NOW PLAYINGArrival (PG-13) Amy Adams saves the world and this science-fiction epic. She plays a linguistics professor who’s brought in by the government when the aliens land to try to communicate with them. Denis Villeneuve (Sicario, Prisoners) adapts this from Ted Chiang’s “Story of Your Life” and does well by the nonlinear source material, as the heroine starts having flash-forwards of her life to come. Unfortunately, the script’s attempts to inject some conventional dramatic tension through human-alien hostilities fall flat, and Villeneuve offers chilly virtuosity where a more emotional approach might have suited the material. He’s bailed out by the great Adams, displaying loneliness, vulnerability, decency, courage, and much-needed warmth at the center of this. Also with Jeremy Renner, Michael Stuhlbarg, Mark O’Brien, Tzi Ma, and Forest Whitaker.Assassin’s Creed (PG-13) Complete gobbledygook. Michael Fassbender stars in this adaptation of the popular video game series as a Texas Death Row prisoner whose ancestry dates back to a killer from a brotherhood of assassins during the Spanish Inquisition, so an evil corporation kidnaps him to recover his me...

Smokey the crow was Waterville's top bird - Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel

Monday, January 23, 2017

One of the most amazing things about Smokey is that he knew what classrooms Lee and his sister attended all day at the old high school — now Gilman Apartments on Gilman Street.“He’d land on the window sill and peck on the glass,” Bureau recalled. “He knew where my sister was. My French teacher was scared to death. I said, ‘Don’t be afraid. It’s just my pet crow.’ I went to the window, and he’d walk back and forth on the window sill outside and then fly off.”Bureau credits his sister, Joy, who died many years ago, for spending so much time with Smokey that he became part of the family and could learn to talk.Smokey, who was Bureau’s best buddy for about three years, ultimately met a sad end in 1952.It was winter and the crow lived in the garage when it was cold, but as temperatures dipped to 15 below zero, the family got worried and put him in their cellar, where he would fly around, talk and play games, according to Bureau.But one day, he pecked open a bag of ready cement and ingested some and died. The family was devastated, Bureau recalled.“I was really bent. I didn’t realize I could be so attached to a crow. It was sad — it really was.”Smokey was featured in the Morning Sentinel several times. A photo with his front-page obituary shows then-police Officer Joe Plisga directing traffic on Main Street downtown as Smokey struts across the street.“There’s people that remember him to this day,” Bureau said. “They see me and say, ‘Aren’t you the guy that had that crow?’ So many people have their own stories about him. He was absolutely amazing. Crows are so smart. You wouldn’t believe the things that Smokey would do — carry a twig a long ways and hop up on the table to give it to me when I was doing a project. It was quite remarkable. I had so much fun with that crow.”Recently, Bureau went to Wendy’s restaurant on Main Street, and there was a group of crows walking around. He saved some of his hamburger for them and he looked one, right in the eye, and talked to it, he recalled.“I could see my crow,” he said. “They’re such beautiful birds.”Amy Calder has been a Morning Sentinel reporter for 29 years. Her column appears here Mondays. She may be reached at [email protected]. For previous Reporting Aside columns, go to centralmaine.com.

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Flutist Irvin Gilman, chamber ensemble founder, died earlier this month - Albany Times Union (blog)

Monday, February 27, 2017

Irvin Gilman, the flutist and saxophonist who co-founded Capitol Chamber Artists more than 40 years ago, died on Feb. 2.A longtime and much-loved member of the region’s classical music community, he would have turned 91 this Wednesday, March 1.The news was announced by his wife of 35 years and CCA co-founder, violinist Mary Lou Saetta. The complete obituary is below.To read Steve Barnes’ piece on Gilman on his return to performing in 2012 after breaking his neck in a fall, click here.IRVIN EDWARD GILMAN (1926-2017) died on Feb. 2, one month short of his 91st birthday. Irv was co-founder and flutist/saxophonist with Capitol Chamber Artists for over 40 years. He was a member for 12 years of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Professor of Music at the University of Albany, for 15 years was Principal flutist with the Albany Symphony Orchestra.He may be heard in solo and chamber music recordings on Centaur and Albany Records and orchestral and jazz recordings on Motown, RCA Victor and Mercury Record...

Film Shorts - Fort Worth Weekly (satire) (blog)

Monday, January 30, 2017

Friday)Paterson (R) Jim Jarmusch’s latest film stars Adam Driver as a bus driver in Paterson, N.J., who writes poetry in his spare time. Also with Golshifteh Farahani, Barry Shabaka Henley, Jared Gilman, Kara Heyward, Masatoshi Nagase, and Method Man. (Opens Friday in Dallas)Raees (NR) Shah Rukh Khan stars in this biography of Raees Alam, a bootlegger who built a criminal empire in the alcohol-free state of Gujarat in the 1980s. Also with Sunny Leone, Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Mahira Khan, Rupinder Nagra, and Mohammed Zeeshan Ayyub. (Opens Friday at AMC Grapevine Mills)Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (R) Milla Jovovich’s farewell to the long-running series has her making one last stand against the zombies and the corporation that created them. Also with Ali Larter, Ruby Rose, Shawn Roberts, William Levy, Lee Joon-gi, Rola, Eoin Macken, and Iain Glen. (Opens Friday)Toni Erdmann (R) Maren Ade’s Oscar-nominated comedy is about an elderly German retiree (Peter Simonischek) who travels to Bucharest and takes eccentric measures to pull his daughter (Sandra Hüller) out of her unsatisfying life as a corporate consultant. Also with Michael Wittenborn, Thomas Loibl, Tristan Pütter, Ingrid Bisu, Hadewych Minis, Vlad Ivanov, and Lucy Russell. (Opens Friday in Dallas)The Woman Who Left (NR) Charo Santos-Conocio stars in this Filipino thriller as a wrongfully imprisoned woman who seeks revenge on her former lover. Also with John Lloyd Cruz, Michael de Mesa, Nonie Buencamino, and Mae Paner. (Opens Friday at AMC Grapevine Mills)NOW PLAYINGArrival (PG-13) Amy Adams saves the world and this science-fiction epic. She plays a linguistics professor who’s brought in by the government when the aliens land to try to communicate with them. Denis Villeneuve (Sicario, Prisoners) adapts this from Ted Chiang’s “Story of Your Life” and does well by the nonlinear source material, as the heroine starts having flash-forwards of her life to come. Unfortunately, the script’s attempts to inject some conventional dramatic tension through human-alien hostilities fall flat, and Villeneuve offers chilly virtuosity where a more emotional approach might have suited the material. He’s bailed out by the great Adams, displaying loneliness, vulnerability, decency, courage, and much-needed warmth at the center of this. Also with Jeremy Renner, Michael Stuhlbarg, Mark O’Brien, Tzi Ma, and Forest Whitaker.Assassin’s Creed (PG-13) Complete gobbledygook. Michael Fassbender stars in this adaptation of the popular video game series as a Texas Death Row prisoner whose ancestry dates back to a killer from a brotherhood of assassins during the Spanish Inquisition, so an evil corporation kidnaps him to recover his me...

Smokey the crow was Waterville's top bird - Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel

Monday, January 23, 2017

One of the most amazing things about Smokey is that he knew what classrooms Lee and his sister attended all day at the old high school — now Gilman Apartments on Gilman Street.“He’d land on the window sill and peck on the glass,” Bureau recalled. “He knew where my sister was. My French teacher was scared to death. I said, ‘Don’t be afraid. It’s just my pet crow.’ I went to the window, and he’d walk back and forth on the window sill outside and then fly off.”Bureau credits his sister, Joy, who died many years ago, for spending so much time with Smokey that he became part of the family and could learn to talk.Smokey, who was Bureau’s best buddy for about three years, ultimately met a sad end in 1952.It was winter and the crow lived in the garage when it was cold, but as temperatures dipped to 15 below zero, the family got worried and put him in their cellar, where he would fly around, talk and play games, according to Bureau.But one day, he pecked open a bag of ready cement and ingested some and died. The family was devastated, Bureau recalled.“I was really bent. I didn’t realize I could be so attached to a crow. It was sad — it really was.”Smokey was featured in the Morning Sentinel several times. A photo with his front-page obituary shows then-police Officer Joe Plisga directing traffic on Main Street downtown as Smokey struts across the street.“There’s people that remember him to this day,” Bureau said. “They see me and say, ‘Aren’t you the guy that had that crow?’ So many people have their own stories about him. He was absolutely amazing. Crows are so smart. You wouldn’t believe the things that Smokey would do — carry a twig a long ways and hop up on the table to give it to me when I was doing a project. It was quite remarkable. I had so much fun with that crow.”Recently, Bureau went to Wendy’s restaurant on Main Street, and there was a group of crows walking around. He saved some of his hamburger for them and he looked one, right in the eye, and talked to it, he recalled.“I could see my crow,” he said. “They’re such beautiful birds.”Amy Calder has been a Morning Sentinel reporter for 29 years. Her column appears here Mondays. She may be reached at [email protected]. For previous Reporting Aside columns, go to centralmaine.com.