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Mcmahon Funeral Home

530 Main Street
Luxemburg, WI 54217
(920) 845-2341
Mcmahon Funeral Home funeral flowers

Mcmahon's Funeral Home

530 Main Street
Luxemburg, WI 54217
(920) 845-2389
Mcmahon's Funeral Home funeral flowers

Luxemburg WI Obituaries and Death Notices

Review: Huntington's 'Blast' is the backstory to Getty's 'London Calling' - 89.3 KPCC

Monday, September 19, 2016

There’s also R. B. Kitaj, who’s been called the greatest historical painter of our time. He’s almost blissfully figurative with his wedding, his refugees; his tributes to the murdered Rosa Luxemburg and Isaac Babel riding with the Red Cavalry; something like Chagall if he’d apprenticed with Breughel.Frank Auerbach and Leon Kossoff -- still painting today in their 80s and 90s – are more expressionist, but still invoke the plain, battered surroundings of a weary metropolis. And Michael Andrews wrapped up his short career with pure landscape, pictures literally infused with the sand and dirt in his paintings.Go see “London Calling” at the Getty first, then head to the Huntington, to see a dozen recently acquired or loaned prime British paintings from before World War 2, some of which strongly influenced the Getty painters. David Bomberg (1890 - 1957), The Slopes of Navao, Picos de Europa, 1935, oil on canvas. Huntington Library, Art Collections, & Botanical GardensThere’s pioneering modernist David Bomberg, with whom both Auerbach and Kossoff studied. You can see in their work Bomberg’s bold use of layered paint and colors, and a leaning toward abstraction. "Mornington Crescent with the Statue of Sickert’s Father-in-Law," 1966, by Frank Auerbach at the Getty Museum's new London Calling exhibit, but ... John RabeThere’s Stanley Spencer, whose powerfully emotional work with its combining of plants, humans, and animals foreshadowed themes of Lucien Freud.Walter Richard Sickert is represented by one of his placidly unsettling "ennui" studies. He’s the Godfather of most modern English painting, and in his later years revised his style in keeping with the younger generation he sometimes mentored.There is the sardonic "Cubist Museum" of Wyndham Lewis, who carried the avant garde torch in British painting until he lost faith in modernism and found equal fame as a novelist.And there’s a fine, subtle portrait by Gwen John, the only woman painter in either of these shows.It’s 28 miles from the Getty to the Huntington, but you should make the trip to see “London Calling” and “Blast.” Together, they provide a rich, continuous century’s span of English figurative art we’ve seldom seen here.

Veteran excelled as engineer, father, traveler - Tribune-Review

Monday, July 25, 2016

Roger L. Rueckl of Washington Township died Tuesday, July 19, 2016, at Monroeville's ManorCare Health Services of complications from dementia. He was 83.Mr. Rueckl was born Feb. 6, 1933, in Luxemburg, Wis., the son of the late Edmund A. and Verna Miller Rueckl. Mr. Rueckl served as an Army clerk on U.S. soil during the Korean War, and used the GI Bill to pay for college at the University of Wisconsin. After graduating, he and his wife, Joan, moved to Monroeville so he could work as a metallurgic engineer for U.S. Steel.He left the job in 1985 to own and operate a metallurgic consulting firm, Reserve Technology, until he retired in 2010. Mr. Rueckl held 12 patents related to steel manufacturing.When he wasn't working, Mr. Rueckl enjoyed woodworking and collecting antique clocks. His daughters said his collection included clocks dating to 1790 and many from the 1800s.He loved to travel and visited 47 states, Canada and Mexico, family members said.Mary Rueckl said one of her father's fondest memories was a nine-week road trip their family took in the summer of 1973. The family of seven and a dog traversed 40 states with a travel trailer.“He said it was the best trip he ever took,” his daughter said. “I marveled he could pull that off.”She was greatly impacted by the way Mr. Rueckl raised her and her siblings, Mary Rueckl said.“He was tough. He taught his four daughters to be very independent, for us to think for ourselves, figure things out,” she said. “He was very loving, but he really strived for us to be self-sufficient and independent.”Mr. Rueckl was preceded in death by his wife, Joan M. Hoida Rueckl.He is survived by four daughters, Mary Rueckl of Washington Township, Beth and husband, John Ferri, of Murrysville, Barbara and husband, Garry H...

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Review: Huntington's 'Blast' is the backstory to Getty's 'London Calling' - 89.3 KPCC

Monday, September 19, 2016

There’s also R. B. Kitaj, who’s been called the greatest historical painter of our time. He’s almost blissfully figurative with his wedding, his refugees; his tributes to the murdered Rosa Luxemburg and Isaac Babel riding with the Red Cavalry; something like Chagall if he’d apprenticed with Breughel.Frank Auerbach and Leon Kossoff -- still painting today in their 80s and 90s – are more expressionist, but still invoke the plain, battered surroundings of a weary metropolis. And Michael Andrews wrapped up his short career with pure landscape, pictures literally infused with the sand and dirt in his paintings.Go see “London Calling” at the Getty first, then head to the Huntington, to see a dozen recently acquired or loaned prime British paintings from before World War 2, some of which strongly influenced the Getty painters. David Bomberg (1890 - 1957), The Slopes of Navao, Picos de Europa, 1935, oil on canvas. Huntington Library, Art Collections, & Botanical GardensThere’s pioneering modernist David Bomberg, with whom both Auerbach and Kossoff studied. You can see in their work Bomberg’s bold use of layered paint and colors, and a leaning toward abstraction. "Mornington Crescent with the Statue of Sickert’s Father-in-Law," 1966, by Frank Auerbach at the Getty Museum's new London Calling exhibit, but ... John RabeThere’s Stanley Spencer, whose powerfully emotional work with its combining of plants, humans, and animals foreshadowed themes of Lucien Freud.Walter Richard Sickert is represented by one of his placidly unsettling "ennui" studies. He’s the Godfather of most modern English painting, and in his later years revised his style in keeping with the younger generation he sometimes mentored.There is the sardonic "Cubist Museum" of Wyndham Lewis, who carried the avant garde torch in British painting until he lost faith in modernism and found equal fame as a novelist.And there’s a fine, subtle portrait by Gwen John, the only woman painter in either of these shows.It’s 28 miles from the Getty to the Huntington, but you should make the trip to see “London Calling” and “Blast.” Together, they provide a rich, continuous century’s span of English figurative art we’ve seldom seen here.

Veteran excelled as engineer, father, traveler - Tribune-Review

Monday, July 25, 2016

Roger L. Rueckl of Washington Township died Tuesday, July 19, 2016, at Monroeville's ManorCare Health Services of complications from dementia. He was 83.Mr. Rueckl was born Feb. 6, 1933, in Luxemburg, Wis., the son of the late Edmund A. and Verna Miller Rueckl. Mr. Rueckl served as an Army clerk on U.S. soil during the Korean War, and used the GI Bill to pay for college at the University of Wisconsin. After graduating, he and his wife, Joan, moved to Monroeville so he could work as a metallurgic engineer for U.S. Steel.He left the job in 1985 to own and operate a metallurgic consulting firm, Reserve Technology, until he retired in 2010. Mr. Rueckl held 12 patents related to steel manufacturing.When he wasn't working, Mr. Rueckl enjoyed woodworking and collecting antique clocks. His daughters said his collection included clocks dating to 1790 and many from the 1800s.He loved to travel and visited 47 states, Canada and Mexico, family members said.Mary Rueckl said one of her father's fondest memories was a nine-week road trip their family took in the summer of 1973. The family of seven and a dog traversed 40 states with a travel trailer.“He said it was the best trip he ever took,” his daughter said. “I marveled he could pull that off.”She was greatly impacted by the way Mr. Rueckl raised her and her siblings, Mary Rueckl said.“He was tough. He taught his four daughters to be very independent, for us to think for ourselves, figure things out,” she said. “He was very loving, but he really strived for us to be self-sufficient and independent.”Mr. Rueckl was preceded in death by his wife, Joan M. Hoida Rueckl.He is survived by four daughters, Mary Rueckl of Washington Township, Beth and husband, John Ferri, of Murrysville, Barbara and husband, Garry H...