Platteville WI Funeral Homes

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Bendorf Funeral Home

180 West Pine Street
Platteville, WI 53818
(608) 348-2121
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Martin Page Funeral Homes

100 Park Place
Platteville, WI 53818
(608) 348-2446
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Platteville WI Obituaries and Death Notices

McDonald, Lorna Mae - Madison.com

Monday, April 03, 2017

TRUMAN - Lorna Mae McDonald, age 83, lifelong resident of Truman, Wis., died on Thursday, March 30, 2017, at Southwest Health Center Hospital, Platteville.A Mass of Christian Burial will be at 11 a.m. Monday, April 3, 2017, at IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CATHOLIC CHURCH, Truman. The Rev. John Bosco will officiate. Burial will be in the church cemetery. Friends may call from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. Sunday at the MELBY FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY, Platteville. There will be an American Legion Auxiliary Service immediately followed by a Scripture Wake service starting at 2:45 p.m. Friends may also call from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday at the funeral home. Memorials may be made to the Lorna Mae McDonald Memorial Fund. Online condolences can be made at www.melbyfh.com Sign up to get each day's obituaries sent to your email inbox Sign up here to receive a daily email alert of local and national obituaries .whatcounts-form-container.well { padding-bottom: 5px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col, .whatcounts-form-container .right-col{ float: left; width: 100%; max-width: 345px;...

Tributes for Nov. 24 - Greeley Tribune

Monday, December 19, 2016

Mark’s Funeral Home, 9293 Eastman Park Drive, Windsor, Colo. 80550.Online condolences may be made at http://www.marksfuneralservice.com.Raymond HuntFeb. 26, 1993-Nov. 12, 2016Age: 23Residence: PlattevilleRaymond “Ray Love” Hunt, 23, of Platteville passed away on Nov. 12, 2016, in LaSalle.Ray Love was born on Feb. 26, 1993, in Bronx, N.Y. to James and Nancy (Perez) Hunt. He grew up in Las Vegas, Nevada, and graduated from high school there.Ray Love was a tinner for Teamwork Mechanical. He loved art, to write, music, especially rapping and comedy. Ray Love was a natural performer.Ray Love is survived by his parents, James and Nancy Hunt of Platteville; brothers, Jeremy (Mandy Wade) Hunt of Las Vegas, Brandon Hunt of Las Vegas, Damian Orellana of Platteville, and James Hunt of Platteville; grandparents, Rosa Velasquez of Las Vegas, Thomas Perez of Miami, Fla., James Hunt of Las Vegas, and Geneva Blake of Las Vegas; two nieces, Mia Mae Wade Hunt, and Isabella Paige Reese Figueroa; and numerous aunts, uncles, and cousins.Viewing will be from 5-7 p.m. with recitation of the rosary at 7 p.m., Monday, Nov. 28, 2016, both at Adamson, 2000 47th Ave., Greeley. Mass of Christian Burial will be on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, at Saint Nicholas Catholic Church, 520 Marion Ave., Platteville, Colo. 80651.Memorial contributions may be made to “Raymond Love GoFundMe.”To leave condolences with Ray Love’s family visit adamsoncares.com.Dale DeVere OlsenJan. 25, 1924-Nov. 19, 2016Age: 92Residence: Casper, Wyo., formerly of GreeleyDale DeVere Olsen went to his heavenly home on Nov. 19, 2016. Dale was born on Jan. 25, 1924, in Greeley to Albert H. and Esther S. Olsen. He was raised on farms in Loveland and Greeley. He attended school at Hazelton and graduated from Greeley High School in 1942. Dale learned to farm from his father. In 1949, he married Charlene Jack of Greeley. He worked on and eventually bought Charlene’s parents’ farm east of Lucerne, which was their home for over 25 years.Dale farmed sugar beets and corn and raised cattle and swine. He was a very successful farmer, having also farmed in Hoyt, Loveland and Briggsdale. During this time they had three children, Jack, Jill and Jody. In addition to farming,...

Roland Sardeson said one of his regrets in life was not dancing a lot more. - Madison.com

Monday, November 21, 2016

Sardeson called it “the seminal event” in his life on which all other things were partially based.In college at UW-Platteville, a random pottery course taken to fulfill an art requirement led him to a job making pottery in Mineral Point, a community of 2,500 people an hour west of Madison.Sandy Scott, who runs the Longbranch Gallery a few doors down from Sardeson’s studio, said in the 1970s, he was the original potter at Shake Rag Alley, a 2½- acre campus of paths, gardens, stone walls and historic buildings.To earn a better living, Sardeson went on to work as a stone mason most of his life. Judy Sutcliffe, who runs the gallery with Scott, said that anyone who has a stone wall in their backyard, it was likely built by Sardeson.In the past few years, he started doing pottery again. “He’s really good at it,” said Sutcliffe.His early pottery “fling” lasted a decade or so, Sardeson wrote in his obituary. “But if you keep your eyes open you can still find my work at rummage sales and antique shops at a fraction of its original cost, and now that I’m gone, who knows what will happen?”Both Scott and Sutcliffe considered Sardeson a close friend. “He’s probably the most beloved figure in this community,” Scott said.“He’s just the spirit of Mineral Point,” Sutcliffe added.Like this story? Get local news sent to your inboxSardeson was active in community theater, performing in just about every play ever produced there, Scott said. He also had a role in every parade.“He was always in costume. You just never knew what to expect next,” she said.Sardeson was also a skydiver and skydiving instructor, Scott said. “He was an ex-Marine but a pacifist, I would say. He was a gentle man.”Sardeson died of liver cancer that was diagnosed in August. He went to Agrace HospiceCare in Fitchburg early Saturday morni...

In own obit, Mineral Point man regrets not dancing a lot more - Madison.com

Monday, November 14, 2016

Sardeson called it “the seminal event” in his life on which all other things were partially based.In college at UW-Platteville, a random pottery course taken to fulfill an art requirement led him to a job making pottery in Mineral Point, a community of 2,500 people an hour west of Madison.Sandy Scott, who runs the Longbranch Gallery a few doors down from Sardeson’s studio, said in the 1970s, he was the original potter at Shake Rag Alley, a two-and-a-half acre campus of paths, gardens, stone walls and historic buildings.To earn a better living, Sardeson went on to work as a stone mason most of his life, and Judy Sutcliffe, who runs the gallery with Scott, said that anybody who has a stone wall in their backyard, it was built by Sardeson.In the past few years, he started doing pottery again. “He’s really good at it,” said Sutcliffe.His early pottery “fling” lasted a decade or so, Sardeson wrote in his obituary. “But if you keep your eyes open you can still find my work at rummage sales and antique shops at a fraction of its original cost, and now that I’m gone, who knows what will happen?”Both Scott and Sutcliffe considered Sardeson a close friend. “He’s probably the most beloved figure in this community,” Scott said.“He’s just the spirit of Mineral Point,” Sutcliffe added.Like this story? Get local news sent to your inboxSardeson was active in community theater, performing in just about every play ever produced there, Scott said. He also had a role in every parade.“He was always in costume. You just never knew what to expect next,” she said.Sardeson was also a sky diver and sky-diving instructor, Scott said. “He was an ex-Marine but a pacifist, I would say. He was a gentle man.”Sardeson died of liver cancer that was diagnosed in August. He went to Agrace HospiceCare in Fitchburg early Saturd...

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McDonald, Lorna Mae - Madison.com

Monday, April 03, 2017

TRUMAN - Lorna Mae McDonald, age 83, lifelong resident of Truman, Wis., died on Thursday, March 30, 2017, at Southwest Health Center Hospital, Platteville.A Mass of Christian Burial will be at 11 a.m. Monday, April 3, 2017, at IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CATHOLIC CHURCH, Truman. The Rev. John Bosco will officiate. Burial will be in the church cemetery. Friends may call from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. Sunday at the MELBY FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY, Platteville. There will be an American Legion Auxiliary Service immediately followed by a Scripture Wake service starting at 2:45 p.m. Friends may also call from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday at the funeral home. Memorials may be made to the Lorna Mae McDonald Memorial Fund. Online condolences can be made at www.melbyfh.com Sign up to get each day's obituaries sent to your email inbox Sign up here to receive a daily email alert of local and national obituaries .whatcounts-form-container.well { padding-bottom: 5px; } .whatcounts-form-container .left-col, .whatcounts-form-container .right-col{ float: left; width: 100%; max-width: 345px;...

Tributes for Nov. 24 - Greeley Tribune

Monday, December 19, 2016

Mark’s Funeral Home, 9293 Eastman Park Drive, Windsor, Colo. 80550.Online condolences may be made at http://www.marksfuneralservice.com.Raymond HuntFeb. 26, 1993-Nov. 12, 2016Age: 23Residence: PlattevilleRaymond “Ray Love” Hunt, 23, of Platteville passed away on Nov. 12, 2016, in LaSalle.Ray Love was born on Feb. 26, 1993, in Bronx, N.Y. to James and Nancy (Perez) Hunt. He grew up in Las Vegas, Nevada, and graduated from high school there.Ray Love was a tinner for Teamwork Mechanical. He loved art, to write, music, especially rapping and comedy. Ray Love was a natural performer.Ray Love is survived by his parents, James and Nancy Hunt of Platteville; brothers, Jeremy (Mandy Wade) Hunt of Las Vegas, Brandon Hunt of Las Vegas, Damian Orellana of Platteville, and James Hunt of Platteville; grandparents, Rosa Velasquez of Las Vegas, Thomas Perez of Miami, Fla., James Hunt of Las Vegas, and Geneva Blake of Las Vegas; two nieces, Mia Mae Wade Hunt, and Isabella Paige Reese Figueroa; and numerous aunts, uncles, and cousins.Viewing will be from 5-7 p.m. with recitation of the rosary at 7 p.m., Monday, Nov. 28, 2016, both at Adamson, 2000 47th Ave., Greeley. Mass of Christian Burial will be on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, at Saint Nicholas Catholic Church, 520 Marion Ave., Platteville, Colo. 80651.Memorial contributions may be made to “Raymond Love GoFundMe.”To leave condolences with Ray Love’s family visit adamsoncares.com.Dale DeVere OlsenJan. 25, 1924-Nov. 19, 2016Age: 92Residence: Casper, Wyo., formerly of GreeleyDale DeVere Olsen went to his heavenly home on Nov. 19, 2016. Dale was born on Jan. 25, 1924, in Greeley to Albert H. and Esther S. Olsen. He was raised on farms in Loveland and Greeley. He attended school at Hazelton and graduated from Greeley High School in 1942. Dale learned to farm from his father. In 1949, he married Charlene Jack of Greeley. He worked on and eventually bought Charlene’s parents’ farm east of Lucerne, which was their home for over 25 years.Dale farmed sugar beets and corn and raised cattle and swine. He was a very successful farmer, having also farmed in Hoyt, Loveland and Briggsdale. During this time they had three children, Jack, Jill and Jody. In addition to farming,...

Roland Sardeson said one of his regrets in life was not dancing a lot more. - Madison.com

Monday, November 21, 2016

Sardeson called it “the seminal event” in his life on which all other things were partially based.In college at UW-Platteville, a random pottery course taken to fulfill an art requirement led him to a job making pottery in Mineral Point, a community of 2,500 people an hour west of Madison.Sandy Scott, who runs the Longbranch Gallery a few doors down from Sardeson’s studio, said in the 1970s, he was the original potter at Shake Rag Alley, a 2½- acre campus of paths, gardens, stone walls and historic buildings.To earn a better living, Sardeson went on to work as a stone mason most of his life. Judy Sutcliffe, who runs the gallery with Scott, said that anyone who has a stone wall in their backyard, it was likely built by Sardeson.In the past few years, he started doing pottery again. “He’s really good at it,” said Sutcliffe.His early pottery “fling” lasted a decade or so, Sardeson wrote in his obituary. “But if you keep your eyes open you can still find my work at rummage sales and antique shops at a fraction of its original cost, and now that I’m gone, who knows what will happen?”Both Scott and Sutcliffe considered Sardeson a close friend. “He’s probably the most beloved figure in this community,” Scott said.“He’s just the spirit of Mineral Point,” Sutcliffe added.Like this story? Get local news sent to your inboxSardeson was active in community theater, performing in just about every play ever produced there, Scott said. He also had a role in every parade.“He was always in costume. You just never knew what to expect next,” she said.Sardeson was also a skydiver and skydiving instructor, Scott said. “He was an ex-Marine but a pacifist, I would say. He was a gentle man.”Sardeson died of liver cancer that was diagnosed in August. He went to Agrace HospiceCare in Fitchburg early Saturday morni...

In own obit, Mineral Point man regrets not dancing a lot more - Madison.com

Monday, November 14, 2016

Sardeson called it “the seminal event” in his life on which all other things were partially based.In college at UW-Platteville, a random pottery course taken to fulfill an art requirement led him to a job making pottery in Mineral Point, a community of 2,500 people an hour west of Madison.Sandy Scott, who runs the Longbranch Gallery a few doors down from Sardeson’s studio, said in the 1970s, he was the original potter at Shake Rag Alley, a two-and-a-half acre campus of paths, gardens, stone walls and historic buildings.To earn a better living, Sardeson went on to work as a stone mason most of his life, and Judy Sutcliffe, who runs the gallery with Scott, said that anybody who has a stone wall in their backyard, it was built by Sardeson.In the past few years, he started doing pottery again. “He’s really good at it,” said Sutcliffe.His early pottery “fling” lasted a decade or so, Sardeson wrote in his obituary. “But if you keep your eyes open you can still find my work at rummage sales and antique shops at a fraction of its original cost, and now that I’m gone, who knows what will happen?”Both Scott and Sutcliffe considered Sardeson a close friend. “He’s probably the most beloved figure in this community,” Scott said.“He’s just the spirit of Mineral Point,” Sutcliffe added.Like this story? Get local news sent to your inboxSardeson was active in community theater, performing in just about every play ever produced there, Scott said. He also had a role in every parade.“He was always in costume. You just never knew what to expect next,” she said.Sardeson was also a sky diver and sky-diving instructor, Scott said. “He was an ex-Marine but a pacifist, I would say. He was a gentle man.”Sardeson died of liver cancer that was diagnosed in August. He went to Agrace HospiceCare in Fitchburg early Saturd...