Verona WI Funeral Homes

Verona WI funeral homes provide local funeral services. Find more information about Joyce Ryan Verona Funeral Home by clicking on each funeral home listing. Send funeral flower arrangements to any Verona funeral home delivered by our trusted local florist.

funeral flowers

Funeral Flowers

Express your deepest sympathies - send beautiful flowers today!

sympathy roses

Sympathy Roses

Give comfort and loving support — order a delivery today!

funeral standing sprays
$20 OFF

Standing Sprays

Heart-felt tributes to honor a dear friend or loved one who has passed away

Joyce Ryan Verona Funeral Home

118 North Franklin Street
Verona, WI 53593
(608) 845-6625
Joyce Ryan Verona Funeral Home funeral flowers

Verona WI Obituaries and Death Notices

Megan E. Villanella - Bucks County Courier Times

Monday, March 13, 2017

Container { margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; }#ndn-video-player-2.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer { margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; }Megan E. (Longo) Villanella of Verona, N.J., formerly of Ivyland, Pa., died tragically and unexpectedly on Friday, March 3, 2017, along with her precious Adaline Grace, who was to be born in May.Megan is survived by the loves and greatest joys of her life, her husband of nine years, James J. Villanella; and their beautiful daughter, Isabelle Ava, who at 22 months just warms your heart and brings a smile to your face.Also surviving Megan are her parents, Derek D. and Constance 'Connie' Roscoe Longo of Ivyland, Pa; her brother Derek J. Longo, a recent resident of Salt Lake City, Utah, but currently residing with Megan's family in Verona, and who was also injured but is recovering in the hospital; her father and mother-in-law, Joseph E. and Nancy A. Fanning Villanella of Paramus, N.J.; sister-in-law, Lauren M. Villanella of Paramus, N.J.; brother-in-law, Daniel (Juliette) Villanella of Fair Lawn, N.J.; brother-in-law, Michael Villanella and Julie Virgone of Jersey City, N.J.; as well as several special aunts, uncles, and cousins.Megan was p...

Deaths for Feb. 28, 2017 - Utica Observer Dispatch

Monday, March 06, 2017

Utica Observer DispatchBeach, Robert J. "Bob," 61, of Utica, died February 26, 2017. Arrangements by McGrath, Myslinski, Karboski & Nunn Funeral Directors, Utica.Burlison, Daryl S., 45, of Verona Beach, died February 26, 2017. Arrangements by Ironside Funeral Home Inc., Oneida.Champoux, David H., 68, of Bluffton, SC, died February 23, 2017. Arrangements by Sauls Funeral Home, Bluffton, SC.Cook, Leah Eileen, 90, of Starkville, died February 24, 2017. Arrangements by J. Seaton McGrath Funeral Home, Richfield Springs.Dober, S. Robert "Bob," 71, of Sherrills Ford, NC, died February 21, 2017. Arrangements by Cavin-Cook Funeral Home, Mooresville, NC.French, Barbara Ann, 75, of Winston-Salem, NC, died February 22, 2017. Arrangements by Hayworth-Miller Funeral Home Inc., Winston-Salem, NC.Greer, Elizabeth (Ford), 93, of Deerfield, died February 24, 2017. Arrangements by Eannace Funeral Home Inc., Utica.Harvey, Keith Meeker, 77, of Sherburne, died February 24, 2017. Arrangements by Burgess & Tedesco Funeral Home, Sherburne.Hosler, Leslie "Les," Sr., 86, of Ilion, died February 26, 2017. Arrangements by Applegate-Day & Enea Family Funeral Home, Ilion.Johnson, Grant E., 83, of New H...

Ed Garvey, Wisconsin progressive and labor attorney, has died - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Monday, February 27, 2017

Garvey's former law partner Glenn Stoddard. "I think his philosophy wasn't about the short term. It was about the longer term. Sometimes you lose but you come back."Garvey died early Wednesday at a Verona nursing home where he had been living for the last two weeks. He was 76. He had been battling Parkinson's disease, which led to his retirement in 2013.The news of Garvey's death was first reported by Dave Zweifel, a longtime Garvey friend and editor emeritus of The Capital Times."I have known Ed Garvey for many years," said state Supreme Court Justice Shirley Abrahamson. "He has exhibited courage throughout his career. His passing leaves a big hole in the legal profession and in the hearts of the many people he has helped over the years."[embedded content]Attorney and activist, Garvey had an impact on sports and politics.He was the first executive director of the National Football League Players Association and led the players through two strikes in 1974 and 1982."Ed brought a professionalism and a structure to the NFLPA. And he was a fighter," said Mark Murphy, president and chief executive officer of the Green Bay Packers.Murphy, a union representative while a player with the Washington Redskins, said Garvey was not liked by NFL management."He fought them on everything," he said."To me, he laid the groundwork for what the players have now."On a personal level, Murphy said Garvey "was so smart. He had a way of making everything fun. I owe a lot to him."In 1986, Garvey lost a bitter U.S. Senate race against Republican Bob Kasten. In 1998, he ran against Republican Gov. Tommy Thompson and lost by a wide margin.During the race against Thompson, Garvey and Barbara Lawton, the candidate for lieutenant governor, barnstormed across the state in recreation...

Connie Ryan marks 50 years in funeral business and welcomes a fourth generation - Madison.com

Monday, January 23, 2017

It’s all I know.”+5 Connie Ryan, 80, left, and Roman Ryan, 51, are second and third generation funeral directors at Ryan & Joyce-Ryan Funeral Homes with locations in Madison, Verona and DeForest.BARRY ADAMS, STATE JOURNALSince 1938, the Ryan family has been a fixture in Madison’s funeral industry when Casey’s great-grandfather, Paul Ryan, left his job as a firefighter in Janesville to buy Hoeveler Funeral Home at 327 W. Johnson St.Gradual growthOver the last 78 years, the family business has grown to four Madison-area locations, including in 2006 the construction of a funeral home near DeForest.Since 1976, the company has been based at 2418 N. Sherman Ave., a facility built by Connie Ryan 10 years after he purchased Larson Funeral Home home a few blocks away at 2114 N. Sherman Ave. Two more funeral homes were added in 2000 when the Ryans purchased Joyce Funeral Home, founded in 1929. Those facilities are at 5701 Odana Road and 118 N. Franklin St. in Verona.“The rural areas, DeForest is getting bigger, Verona is getting bigger and it all comes together,” said Connie Ryan, who was a one-man band in his first seven years of owning the funeral home and this year is marking 50 years in the business. “Would I do it again? Probably. We just gradually grew by providing top-notch service.”+5 Paul Ryan began his Madison funeral business in 1938 when he purchased Larson Funeral Home on West Johnson Street. His son Connie founded Ryan Funeral Home in 1966.BARRY ADAMS, badams@madison.comPaul Ryan obtained his funeral license in 1925 and worked at Overton Funeral Home in Janesville until 1930, but switched to firefighting during the Great Depression after his father died. He returned to his funeral career in 1938 and then merged the business with Fitch-Lawrence Funeral Home in 1955.Ryan left the company a short time later but in 1960 opened a funeral home on King Street in Downtown Madison.Family footstepsConnie, now 80, followed suit in 1966 when, after he got out of the Marines and did a stint tending bar, he opened Ryan Funeral Home at 2114 N. Sherman Ave. His first service was for Jack Burke, who owned a Lake Mendota supper club that is now Mariner’s Inn.Connie’s brothers, Pat and Paul, founded Ryan Brothers A...

From green burials to tree urns; after-life options - Cherry Hill Courier Post

Monday, November 07, 2016

They have the first record of the practice.What we commonly associate with funerals – an embalmed body and a wooden casket – goes back to the Civil War, said Bob Prout of Prout Funeral Home in Verona. Northern families didn’t want their sons buried on Southern battlefields, so they shipped the bodies back home. Embalming helped make those long trips by horse or train possible.“Burials are very traditional, they’re usually something passed down with the family,” Keeney said. They can also be cultural. In Tibet, Keeney said, where the ground is rocky, people practice “sky burials,” placing the body on mountaintops to be slowly carried away by birds.In some European countries with limited land space, burial plots are rented. “Once the last living family member is no longer alive and able to pay for that space, they will go and pick up all the family members and put them in a mass grave,” Keeney said.Often, the deceased don’t have funeral plans in place and family members left to choose gravitate toward conventional choices.“One of the things I’m very passionate about is getting people to understand if they take the time to plan their funeral, they can have a lot of aspects to speak of who they were in life,” Keeney said. “It’s your final party. What do you want that final party to say about you? How do you want your loved ones to remember you?”In the U.S., said George Kelder, CEO and executive director of the New Jersey State Funeral Directors Association, funeral service is regulated by the Federal Trade Commission with laws written in 1984 (and revised in 1994) that reflect the cultural norm of the 1970s and ‘80s.“Today, it’s a complete blank slate,” Kelder said. “I think there’s something for everyone out there. It’s the ‘if you build it, they will come’ analogy.”Greg Herro, CEO of LifeGem, examines a blue diamond made from the carbon remains of an animal at the Bollingbrook-McCauley Funeral Home in Bollingbrook, Ill., Oct. 18, 2002. By extracting the carbon from cremated human bodies, the Chicago-based company is giving the dearly departed a chance to sparkle forever as a synthetically produced diamond. (Photo: Aynsley Floyd)About half of the burials Freitag oversees are traditional funerals, with cremation making up around 45 percent. What the family does with the cremated remains can vary.Sometimes ashes get left at the funeral home, never to be picked up, though Freitag hasn’t had that happen. Cremated remains can be divided between family members, transformed into something else, buried or scattered.“I’ve had people charter a boat and scatter them in the ocean,” Freitag said. “I’ve had people scatter them from an airplane. I had a man who requested his cremated rema...

Funeral Home Flowers

Verona News

Megan E. Villanella - Bucks County Courier Times

Monday, March 13, 2017

Container { margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; }#ndn-video-player-2.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer { margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; }Megan E. (Longo) Villanella of Verona, N.J., formerly of Ivyland, Pa., died tragically and unexpectedly on Friday, March 3, 2017, along with her precious Adaline Grace, who was to be born in May.Megan is survived by the loves and greatest joys of her life, her husband of nine years, James J. Villanella; and their beautiful daughter, Isabelle Ava, who at 22 months just warms your heart and brings a smile to your face.Also surviving Megan are her parents, Derek D. and Constance 'Connie' Roscoe Longo of Ivyland, Pa; her brother Derek J. Longo, a recent resident of Salt Lake City, Utah, but currently residing with Megan's family in Verona, and who was also injured but is recovering in the hospital; her father and mother-in-law, Joseph E. and Nancy A. Fanning Villanella of Paramus, N.J.; sister-in-law, Lauren M. Villanella of Paramus, N.J.; brother-in-law, Daniel (Juliette) Villanella of Fair Lawn, N.J.; brother-in-law, Michael Villanella and Julie Virgone of Jersey City, N.J.; as well as several special aunts, uncles, and cousins.Megan was p...

Deaths for Feb. 28, 2017 - Utica Observer Dispatch

Monday, March 06, 2017

Utica Observer DispatchBeach, Robert J. "Bob," 61, of Utica, died February 26, 2017. Arrangements by McGrath, Myslinski, Karboski & Nunn Funeral Directors, Utica.Burlison, Daryl S., 45, of Verona Beach, died February 26, 2017. Arrangements by Ironside Funeral Home Inc., Oneida.Champoux, David H., 68, of Bluffton, SC, died February 23, 2017. Arrangements by Sauls Funeral Home, Bluffton, SC.Cook, Leah Eileen, 90, of Starkville, died February 24, 2017. Arrangements by J. Seaton McGrath Funeral Home, Richfield Springs.Dober, S. Robert "Bob," 71, of Sherrills Ford, NC, died February 21, 2017. Arrangements by Cavin-Cook Funeral Home, Mooresville, NC.French, Barbara Ann, 75, of Winston-Salem, NC, died February 22, 2017. Arrangements by Hayworth-Miller Funeral Home Inc., Winston-Salem, NC.Greer, Elizabeth (Ford), 93, of Deerfield, died February 24, 2017. Arrangements by Eannace Funeral Home Inc., Utica.Harvey, Keith Meeker, 77, of Sherburne, died February 24, 2017. Arrangements by Burgess & Tedesco Funeral Home, Sherburne.Hosler, Leslie "Les," Sr., 86, of Ilion, died February 26, 2017. Arrangements by Applegate-Day & Enea Family Funeral Home, Ilion.Johnson, Grant E., 83, of New H...

Ed Garvey, Wisconsin progressive and labor attorney, has died - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Monday, February 27, 2017

Garvey's former law partner Glenn Stoddard. "I think his philosophy wasn't about the short term. It was about the longer term. Sometimes you lose but you come back."Garvey died early Wednesday at a Verona nursing home where he had been living for the last two weeks. He was 76. He had been battling Parkinson's disease, which led to his retirement in 2013.The news of Garvey's death was first reported by Dave Zweifel, a longtime Garvey friend and editor emeritus of The Capital Times."I have known Ed Garvey for many years," said state Supreme Court Justice Shirley Abrahamson. "He has exhibited courage throughout his career. His passing leaves a big hole in the legal profession and in the hearts of the many people he has helped over the years."[embedded content]Attorney and activist, Garvey had an impact on sports and politics.He was the first executive director of the National Football League Players Association and led the players through two strikes in 1974 and 1982."Ed brought a professionalism and a structure to the NFLPA. And he was a fighter," said Mark Murphy, president and chief executive officer of the Green Bay Packers.Murphy, a union representative while a player with the Washington Redskins, said Garvey was not liked by NFL management."He fought them on everything," he said."To me, he laid the groundwork for what the players have now."On a personal level, Murphy said Garvey "was so smart. He had a way of making everything fun. I owe a lot to him."In 1986, Garvey lost a bitter U.S. Senate race against Republican Bob Kasten. In 1998, he ran against Republican Gov. Tommy Thompson and lost by a wide margin.During the race against Thompson, Garvey and Barbara Lawton, the candidate for lieutenant governor, barnstormed across the state in recreation...

Connie Ryan marks 50 years in funeral business and welcomes a fourth generation - Madison.com

Monday, January 23, 2017

It’s all I know.”+5 Connie Ryan, 80, left, and Roman Ryan, 51, are second and third generation funeral directors at Ryan & Joyce-Ryan Funeral Homes with locations in Madison, Verona and DeForest.BARRY ADAMS, STATE JOURNALSince 1938, the Ryan family has been a fixture in Madison’s funeral industry when Casey’s great-grandfather, Paul Ryan, left his job as a firefighter in Janesville to buy Hoeveler Funeral Home at 327 W. Johnson St.Gradual growthOver the last 78 years, the family business has grown to four Madison-area locations, including in 2006 the construction of a funeral home near DeForest.Since 1976, the company has been based at 2418 N. Sherman Ave., a facility built by Connie Ryan 10 years after he purchased Larson Funeral Home home a few blocks away at 2114 N. Sherman Ave. Two more funeral homes were added in 2000 when the Ryans purchased Joyce Funeral Home, founded in 1929. Those facilities are at 5701 Odana Road and 118 N. Franklin St. in Verona.“The rural areas, DeForest is getting bigger, Verona is getting bigger and it all comes together,” said Connie Ryan, who was a one-man band in his first seven years of owning the funeral home and this year is marking 50 years in the business. “Would I do it again? Probably. We just gradually grew by providing top-notch service.”+5 Paul Ryan began his Madison funeral business in 1938 when he purchased Larson Funeral Home on West Johnson Street. His son Connie founded Ryan Funeral Home in 1966.BARRY ADAMS, badams@madison.comPaul Ryan obtained his funeral license in 1925 and worked at Overton Funeral Home in Janesville until 1930, but switched to firefighting during the Great Depression after his father died. He returned to his funeral career in 1938 and then merged the business with Fitch-Lawrence Funeral Home in 1955.Ryan left the company a short time later but in 1960 opened a funeral home on King Street in Downtown Madison.Family footstepsConnie, now 80, followed suit in 1966 when, after he got out of the Marines and did a stint tending bar, he opened Ryan Funeral Home at 2114 N. Sherman Ave. His first service was for Jack Burke, who owned a Lake Mendota supper club that is now Mariner’s Inn.Connie’s brothers, Pat and Paul, founded Ryan Brothers A...

From green burials to tree urns; after-life options - Cherry Hill Courier Post

Monday, November 07, 2016

They have the first record of the practice.What we commonly associate with funerals – an embalmed body and a wooden casket – goes back to the Civil War, said Bob Prout of Prout Funeral Home in Verona. Northern families didn’t want their sons buried on Southern battlefields, so they shipped the bodies back home. Embalming helped make those long trips by horse or train possible.“Burials are very traditional, they’re usually something passed down with the family,” Keeney said. They can also be cultural. In Tibet, Keeney said, where the ground is rocky, people practice “sky burials,” placing the body on mountaintops to be slowly carried away by birds.In some European countries with limited land space, burial plots are rented. “Once the last living family member is no longer alive and able to pay for that space, they will go and pick up all the family members and put them in a mass grave,” Keeney said.Often, the deceased don’t have funeral plans in place and family members left to choose gravitate toward conventional choices.“One of the things I’m very passionate about is getting people to understand if they take the time to plan their funeral, they can have a lot of aspects to speak of who they were in life,” Keeney said. “It’s your final party. What do you want that final party to say about you? How do you want your loved ones to remember you?”In the U.S., said George Kelder, CEO and executive director of the New Jersey State Funeral Directors Association, funeral service is regulated by the Federal Trade Commission with laws written in 1984 (and revised in 1994) that reflect the cultural norm of the 1970s and ‘80s.“Today, it’s a complete blank slate,” Kelder said. “I think there’s something for everyone out there. It’s the ‘if you build it, they will come’ analogy.”Greg Herro, CEO of LifeGem, examines a blue diamond made from the carbon remains of an animal at the Bollingbrook-McCauley Funeral Home in Bollingbrook, Ill., Oct. 18, 2002. By extracting the carbon from cremated human bodies, the Chicago-based company is giving the dearly departed a chance to sparkle forever as a synthetically produced diamond. (Photo: Aynsley Floyd)About half of the burials Freitag oversees are traditional funerals, with cremation making up around 45 percent. What the family does with the cremated remains can vary.Sometimes ashes get left at the funeral home, never to be picked up, though Freitag hasn’t had that happen. Cremated remains can be divided between family members, transformed into something else, buried or scattered.“I’ve had people charter a boat and scatter them in the ocean,” Freitag said. “I’ve had people scatter them from an airplane. I had a man who requested his cremated rema...